BLACK AND WHITE
21.8K views | +1 today
Follow
BLACK AND WHITE
Wonderful black and white photography
Curated by Photo report
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Karczeby | photographer: Adam Pańczuk

Karczeby | photographer: Adam Pańczuk | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Karczebs
In one of the dialects spoken in the east of Poland, which is a mixture of Polish and Belorussian, people strongly attached to the soil they had been cultivating for generetations were called "Karczebs". With their bare hands Karczebs cleared forests in order to grow crops. The word Karczeb was also used to describe what remains after a tree is cut down - a trunk with roots, which remains stuck in the ground. This also applied to people - it was not easy for the authorities to root them out from their land, even in the Stalinism times. The price they paid for their attachment to their soil was often their freedom or life. After death, hurried nearby their farmland, a Karczeb himself became the soil, later cultivated by his descendants.

Photo report's insight:

In Karczeby, Warsaw-based photographer Adam Panczuk captures intimate portraits of Polish farmers and their connection and respect for the land they cultivate. Deeply rooted, steady and still, these are a people with the land in their blood and bones, defined by a livelihood built in nature.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

What We Conjure | Photographer: Scott Alario

What We Conjure | Photographer: Scott Alario | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"We are on a search for the spiritually significant, the magic in every day. What will we find that’s worth passing down? What will we conjure?"—Scott Alario

Photo report's insight:

Photographer Scott Alario is based in Providence, Rhode Island. His seriesWhat We Conjure was made with an 8×10 view camera, and adds to the great lineage of photographers like Emmet Gowin and Nicholas Nixon who have documented those most dear to them. Alario explores his role as a father by making these pictures, occasionally appearing in them himself.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Фото и рисунки, арт и креативная реклама - Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet

Фото и рисунки, арт и креативная реклама - Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Фото и рисунки интересных людей, гламурные фото от лучших фотографов, красивые рисунки замечательных художников. Фанстастическо мышление, рисунки в стиле фентези, сказка, красивые иллюстрации. Профессиональны фото.

 

Twilight Tales

In Japan, I discovered the works of Lotte Reiniger. I saw some very good cartoons where the shadows made it very effectively evoking the posture of the protagonists and the plot was more striking narrated.

So I noted in my notebook December 5, 2006: “Shadow and narration. Photography”…

One day, I took my camera and I went down into the courtyard. My 5 year old girl looking for ladybugs and snails in the pile of dead leaves that lay along the shed. She wants to give me the benefit of each of these discoveries.

It is by chance seeing our shadow on the lawn that I remembered the work of Lotte Reiniger.

I came back at home to draw an animal on thick paper. The animal is a fawn paper which I drew the outline of a box that I put on a low wall. The photo was taken at dusk. The best time to photograph the shadows.- Serge Bouvet

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Naadam Portraits | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty

Naadam Portraits | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Horse racing is a part of Naadam, a Mongolian festival that has been celebrated since the times of Genghis Khan. It is most recently held every July to commemorate the People's Revolution. Traditionally, the jockeys are children in these races. It is said that Mongols learn to ride before they can walk and feel safer on horseback than on the ground. Boys and girls as young as five are used as jockeys because a Naadam race is not a test for riders, but for horses. However, the races can be very dangerous, with hundreds of horses running at great speeds across a steppe of 12 to 28 kilometers. In preparing for Naadam, children take part in repeated practice races and help the trainers take care of the racehorses. According to some estimates, 150 to 180 thousand horses with more than 30 thousand child jockeys compete in over 500 races each year.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Lee Jeffries

Lee Jeffries | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Lee Jeffries lives in Manchester in the United Kingdom. Close to the professional football circle, this artist starts to photograph sporting events.

 

A chance meeting with a young homeless girl in the streets of London changes his artistic approach forever. Lee Jeffries recalls that, initially, he had stolen a photo from this young homeless girl huddled in a sleeping bag.

 

The photographer knew that the young girl had noticed him but his first reaction was to leave. He says that something made him stay and go and discuss with the homeless girl. His perception about the homeless completely changes. They become the subject of his art. The models in his photographs are homeless people that he has met in Europe and in the United States: «Situations arose, and I made an effort to learn to get to know each of the subjects before asking their permission to do their portrait.» From then onwards, his photographs portray his convictions and his compassion to the world.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Anonymous | Photographer: Sofía López Mañan

Anonymous | Photographer: Sofía López Mañan | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In “Anonymous” I used stand-ins for self portraits and this allowed me to step outside of my self.

The nameless women silently speak for me. They become me in a universal sense. I think it might be easier to reveal our deeper truths anonymously. I am anonymously directing the emotional expression of universal characters. In essence these photographs are emotion portraits, and by stepping away from my individuality, I feel it invites the viewer to engage themselves in the mystery of their own truths, or to contemplate how the emotions depicted resonate in their own lives.

“Anonymous” was published in the last year in Al Limite Magazine, Eyemazing and Mono by Gomma Books.

 

 

Photo report's insight:

Sofía López Mañan was born in 1982 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She has a B.A degree in fine arts by the Instituto Universitario Nacional de las Artes. She also studied advertising, photography and art direction in film.

In 2012 was awarded by Mono open call for emerging photographers and was also nominated to attend the Joops Master class. She also received in 2011 a scholarship to attend the Foundry Photojournalism Workshop and participated in Buenos Aires PhotoWorkshop.

Her work as been exhibit in Argentina, Spain and in various international art fairs.

She currently works as freelance photojournalist working in various national media and at the same time makes documentary projects independently.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂

Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The word "karoshi" came into common use around 1990, when Japanese workers began working longer hours in response to competition from overseas and the recession at the time. Despite increased awareness of the dangers of overwork, de-regulation and increased global competition means that Japanese workers are working harder than ever.


About 20 years ago, heart attacks or strokes were a symbol of ‘karoshi’ in Japan. Today, workers are committing suicide. Of the more than 30,000 suicides recorded 2009, 10,000 were believed to be related to work, according to data from the national police agency. Suicide triggered by overwork is particularly prevalent among white color workers, also known as “salarymen” in Japan. Salarymen devote long work hours and loyalty to companies in exchange for a life-time of employment and benefits.

 

With the recession of the 1990s and the lifting of a ban on the use of cheap temporary laborers, salarymen increasingly work longer hours because of a shortage of manpower and the fear of losing jobs.

Photo report's insight:

Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 is a Japanese photojournalist currently working out of Beijing, China. Her clientele consists of The New York Times, MSNBC, Le Monde, the Chicago Tribune and the New York magazine, among others. She won the Grand Prize in Editor and Publisher Magazine’s Ninth Annual Photos of the Year contest in 2008. Fukada also won an Alicia Patterson Journalism Fellowship in 2010 to research and photograph Japan's disposable workers.

Fukada majored in English literature and first worked in fashion advertising as an account executive. She borrowed a 35 mm SLR camera and started making photos.
more...
Benedyct Antifer's curator insight, March 26, 2013 12:39 PM

Travail impressionnant sur une société qui aliène de plus en plus la seule richesse dont elle dispose : les gens qui la compose...

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Yoga performers | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty

Yoga performers | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

There are many interpretations of yoga, both in India and in the western world. In the Vedic religious tradition, yoga is seen as a pathway to achieving spiritual enlightenment through physical training and as a way of living in harmony with your body and nature. It is also an accepted form of gymnastics and is often used as therapy. Yoga, with its Indian roots stretching back 2000 years, is not typically associated with sport since it does not involve any competition. However, every three years, pilgrims, spiritual masters, and yogis travel to India for the Kumbh Mela Hindu feast. Different schools and sects meet to display their achievements in the practice of yoga and pranayama (control over the breath).


It’s the biggest gathering of people in the world. One of Shiva’s manifestations, the god Nataraja, is the patron saint of the event. Over time, the rules of competition were formally organized and most recently, yoga asana has been included in modern sport yoga. Yogis who participate in the contest are separated into age groups and perform in singles, pairs, or groups. But even with all these formal rules and regulations, the technical aspect does not eclipse the spiritual. The official rules of the Yoga Federation of India state that “while performing yoga positions the contestant should show his/her happiness and spirituality.” This helps keep contestants in touch with teachings of the ancient Hindu masters, who regarded happiness as a task well within the reach of all humans.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

A Tale of Two Slums | Photographer: Stephen Dupont

A Tale of Two Slums | Photographer: Stephen Dupont | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

There are two excellent photographic essays of Polaroids made in the Mumbai slum Dharavi and the Senen slum of Jakarta by Stephen Dupont, an Australian photographer.

Dharavi is one of the world's largest slum and lies on prime real estate in the middle of India's financial capital, Mumbai and has a population estimated to be 1 million. Many businesses flourish in this slum, such as traditional pottery and textiles, a recycling industry, which generate an estimated $650 million turnover a year.

As for the Senen slum, it's a trackside slum in central Jakarta. It's also a center for recycling, and its inhabitants live cheek to jowl with the thundering trains.

  Stephen Dupont has produced a photographs of fragile cultures and marginalized peoples, which capture the human dignity of his subjects, and do so with great intimacy and often in some of the world’s most dangerous regions. His work has earned him prestigious prizes, including a Robert Capa Gold Medal citation from the Overseas Press Club of America; a Bayeux War Correspondent’s Prize; and first places in the World Press Photo, Pictures of the Year International, the Australian Walkleys, and Leica/CCP Documentary Award.

His work has been featured in The New Yorker, Aperture, Newsweek, Time, GQ, Esquire, French and German GEO, Le Figaro, Liberation, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Independent, The Guardian, The New York Times Magazine, Stern, The Australian Financial Review Magazine, and Vanity Fair.

He has held major exhibitions in London, Paris, New York, Sydney, Canberra, Tokyo, and Shanghai, and at Perpignan’s Visa Pour L’Image, China’s Ping Yao and Holland’s Noorderlicht festivals.


A Tale of Two Slums Part I: 

http://stephendupont.squarespace.com/essays/a-tale-of-two-slums-part-i

A Tale of Two Slums Part II:

http://stephendupont.squarespace.com/essays/a-tale-of-two-slums-part-ii

more...
Pooja Singh's comment, October 23, 2013 8:50 AM
Our homes and dreams are being taken away from us: Campa Cola Compound Story - The Facts http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZsivIMNiOY Show your support by sharing the video and by signing a petition onhttp://bit.ly/savecampacola
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

The Peloton | Photographer: Timm Kölln

The Peloton | Photographer: Timm Kölln | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Timm Kölln, 1976, Germany, lives and works in Berlin. For many years he has been following cycling races as the Tour the France, Paris - Roubaix and the Giro d'Italia. He is not your ordinary sports photographer, unlike his colleagues that photograph and register the various races with digital equipment, Timm still shoots everything on film. He sees cycling as an aesthetic sport and brings that back in his, mostly black and white, photography. In 2010 he released his book The Peloton. It contains strong images of the riders several seconds after they crossed the finish line. The photographs from the series Lo Stelvio are made with a pinhole camera. The following images come from the portfolio's The Peloton.

 

more...
No comment yet.