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Geography Strikes Back

Geography Strikes Back | Blabberlab | Scoop.it
To understand today's global conflicts, forget economics and technology and take a hard look at a map, writes Robert D. Kaplan.

 

This is a timely article that shows the importance of geography in understanding current events throughout the world.  Also included in this link are videos and pictures connected to an interactive map that highlights a few global conflicts.  Students would benefit from reading this article in preparation for completing a news article assignment.  Geographic context always matters; it might not tell the whole story but it will certainly shape it.   

 

Tags: Geography, GeographyEducation, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


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Andrew Shears, PhD's comment, September 9, 2012 12:41 PM
Really good critical reaction to this piece from Derek Gregory: http://geographicalimaginations.com/2012/09/08/geography-strikes-back/
Seth Dixon's comment, December 11, 2012 11:37 AM
Thanks for sharing that article Andy, I'm just seeing it now!
Wyatt Fratnz's curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:05 PM

  This informative article gives us a different insight to politics, claiming that countries action in politics, war, etc. are based upon where they are located. It goes on to describe different examples containing spatial, economic and political conflict. Afterward, it describes what this has to do and how it effects people (and their governments).

 

  This gives us a great insight on how space is afflicted with the territorial dimensions of politics. It relates to why certain nations make the different decisions they do and how it is related to our everyday lives.

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How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land?

How Big a Backyard Would You Need to Live Off the Land? | Blabberlab | Scoop.it

Tags: infographic, food, agriculture, sustainability, urban, urban ecology, locavore, land use, unit 5 agriculture, unit 7 cities.


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Crissy Borton's comment, September 11, 2012 8:36 PM
Looking at purchasing a house in the next year or so and this is one thing we have been looking at. Although we don't want to raise our own meat we would like to grow everything else we eat.
Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:44 PM

Good visual representation of what it would take to be self sufficient.

Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 9:51 AM

If you need a backyard that is about 2 acres to live off the land imagine how big of a backyard you would need if you had a family of 8.

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English Worksheets | Have Fun Teaching

English Worksheets, Free English Worksheets, English Worksheet, English Printables, English Printable Worksheets, English Language Worksheets...

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"Brilliant designs to fit more people in every city" by Kent Larson | Video on TED.com

TED Talks How can we fit more people into cities without overcrowding? Kent Larson shows off folding cars, quick-change apartments and other innovations that could make the city of the future work a lot like a small village of the past.

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What If?

What If? | Blabberlab | Scoop.it

This blogpost answers the (often unasked) question:  What would the world be like if the land masses were spread out the same way as now - only rotated by an angle of 90 degrees? While purely hypothetical, this is an exercise in applying real geographic thinking to different situations.  Anything that you would correct? 

 

Tags: weather climate, geography, GeographyEducation, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, physical. 


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Dania's comment, September 5, 2012 11:41 PM
well!!!
I'll tell you that it's why God created Mother Nature. maybe what we think is bad now in nature can be worse for the the Earth and human being... I think if the ground is moved 90 degree, many natural phenomena would happened in many regions of the Earth which would be harm to people, plants and animals that live in those regions. Plus, the population of poor nation would not be prepared for those climate changes.... many people would die or they have to move from those regions.
Jeff F's comment, September 6, 2012 12:50 AM
This looks like a map from the classic NES game Dragon Warrior II only flipped upside down. #nerd

Anyways, I think the most densely populated areas would be around the central ocean with New York and London being primate cities of their respected hemispheres.

Given that that the central ocean area is in an equatorial region, agriculture would likely not be very prosperous in these regions. Instead, I imagine New York becoming the center of an imperial superpower. Seeing as the most fertile regions of both South and North America are in temperate areas, agriculture would be a dominating industry.

The northern hemisphere on the other I hand I imagine would be largely undeveloped and rural. The "breadbaskets" of this hemispher are located much further inland from the central ocean.
Ian Roberts's comment, September 11, 2012 8:57 PM
First off I would like to say travel to Europe would be much easier and the Pacific Ocean grew even larger. One thing that really got me wondering was whether the world would be northern hemisphere centered or southern hemisphere centered. Currently, there are many more people in the northern hemisphere, so things like the summer olympics are held in our summer, their winter. BUt with the world turned ninety degrees, the population will be much more similar. The north will probably still have more people, but the south has America. It would be interesting to see how they would decide that conflict.
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Writing

Writing | Blabberlab | Scoop.it
English writing for ESL students. Lessons, advice and tips on how to write in English. The skill of writing.

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The Scale of the Universe

The Scale of the Universe | Blabberlab | Scoop.it
Zoom from the edge of the universe to the quantum foam of spacetime and learn about everything in between.

 

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.

 

Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.


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Mark V's comment, September 10, 2012 2:38 PM
I felt that this is an excellent way to understand spatial thinking which is important in many areas beyond geography.
Joe Andrade's curator insight, July 7, 2013 10:08 PM

This is a great method of teaching some of the principals behind understanding spatial analysis. An important skill in understanding the world we live in.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 7:50 AM

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.


Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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101 Excellent Sites for English Educators

101 Excellent Sites for English Educators | Blabberlab | Scoop.it
A list of the top 101 websites for English & Language Arts (ELA) chosen by real teachers from prominent LinkedIn groups.

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Engin Çolak's comment, August 18, 2012 8:59 PM
i recommend www.voscreen.com
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The global debt clock

The global debt clock | Blabberlab | Scoop.it
Authoritative weekly newspaper focusing on international politics and business news and opinion.

 

Tags: Economic, currency, visualization.


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Guillaume Decugis's comment, September 6, 2012 3:06 PM
Remember when we used to talk about the 3rd-world debt being a problem? (Back when the term 3rd world was actually not politically incorrect...) Well, this map clearly shows, debt is a 1st-world problem now...

Awesome map Seth! Thanks for sharing.
Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, September 2, 2014 1:42 AM

Welcome to Investors Europe Mauritius Stock Brokers

@investorseurope Online Trading Paradigm

@offshorebroker Nominee Trading Accounts
http://www.investorseurope.net/en/managing-director ;
http://www.investorseurope.net/en/nominee-accounts

Download Offshore Trading DEMO: http://www.investorseurope.net/offshoretraderdemo.html

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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | Blabberlab | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


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Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

savvy's curator insight, September 3, 2014 12:57 PM

This just makes me realize how the world would be if we only had 100 people rather than the billions we have now.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 26, 2015 7:24 AM

A face das crianças no mundo

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"Charlie & the Chocolate Factory" << lessons ideas [ edgalaxy.comy Meet.

"Charlie & the Chocolate Factory" << lessons ideas [ edgalaxy.comy Meet. | Blabberlab | Scoop.it

"Charlie and the Chocolate factory is one of the most popular children's books of all time.[...] "Charlie" offers a multitude of teaching and learning opportunities based around the themes of bad parenting, mischievous children, greed, gluttony and much more. Roald Dahl uses little Charlie Bucket as a role model to oppose all of the horrible aspects of the other children selected to enter Willy Wonka's chocolate factory.This Grid I have constructed uses Blooms Taxonomy as a framework to study the book and films and has 42 excellent teaching and learning ideas. [...]"


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Map Envelope

Map Envelope | Blabberlab | Scoop.it

Print your own customized, place-based envelopes using Google Maps imagery. This is fun!

 

 

 

Tags: art, google, mapping. 


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What is GIS?

This is a brief introduction to what geographic information systems are.  This is not a tutorial on how to use it, but a conceptual overview on the potential uses and applications for GIS.  

 

Tags: GIS, video, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples, geospatial, mapping and location.


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CT Blake's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:55 AM

Useful for understanding the use of GIS and differences with GPS.

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OverlapMaps - Instantly compare any two places on Earth!

OverlapMaps - Instantly compare any two places on Earth! | Blabberlab | Scoop.it
An OverlapMap is a map of one part of the world that overlaps a different part of the world. OverlapMaps show relative size.

 

This is an very simple way to demonstrate the true size of places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper.  


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Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:07 PM
This toll will and can provide a reliable mapping source to geographers everywhere. It is useful and fun. A neat way to learn cartography
Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 11:31 PM
The OverlapMap is a very useful tool that will allow a user to compare different places and parts of the world. Having a more accurate size of a place is critical when comparing 2 or more places. I think that many users besides me will find this very convenient when other resources are not available.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 21, 2014 11:48 PM

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is a very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper. 

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Education World: Best Icebreaker and Get-to-Know-You Activities

Education World: Best Icebreaker and Get-to-Know-You Activities | Blabberlab | Scoop.it
Here are the best of the more than 150 ideas that teachers have shared with us over the years.

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Michelle Hayes's curator insight, July 25, 2015 10:11 PM

Tried and true? Let's see what works!

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elllo

elllo | Blabberlab | Scoop.it
Learn real English language from English speakers around the world on elllo with free listening, reading, and vocabulary activities and downloads.

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IdiomSite.com - Find out the meanings of common sayings

IdiomSite.com - Find out the meanings of common sayings | Blabberlab | Scoop.it

Useful site for studying idioms. It gives simple and accurate definitions to a good range of idioms.


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10 Technology Enhanced Alternatives to Book Reports

10 Technology Enhanced Alternatives to Book Reports | Blabberlab | Scoop.it
The most dreaded word in school reading for students: book reports. Teachers assign them, viewing them as a necessary component of assessing reading comprehension. Book reports can be a contributing factor to 'readicide'.

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