BKDA Continuing Professional Development Archive
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BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive
An archive of articles detailing historic design styles and movements as they relate to kitchen design .
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Modernism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Modernism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A salient characteristic of Modernism is self-consciousness. This self-consciousness often led to experiments with form and an approach that draws attention to the processes and materials used in creating a painting, poem, building, novel, etc.

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Modernism - Victoria and Albert Museum

Modernism - Victoria and Albert Museum | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
Modernism in design and architecture emerged in the aftermath of the First World War and the Russian Revolution – a period when the artistic avant-garde dreamed of a new world free of conflict, greed and social inequality.
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Minimalism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Minimalism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Minimalism and science fiction may have contributed to the late twentieth century futuristic architecture design and modern home decor. Modern minimalistic home architecture probably led to the popularity of the open plan kitchen and living room style by removing unnecessary internal walls

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A minimalistic kitchen designed for entertaining and family time

A minimalistic kitchen designed for entertaining and family time | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
In this interview, Snaidero kitchen designer Allison Ortiz talks about designing a minimalistic kitchen suitable for both large gatherings and family time.
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Gothic art - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gothic art was a style of Medieval art that developed in France out of Romanesque art in the mid-12th century, led by the concurrent development of Gothic architecture. It spread to all of Western Europe, but took over art more completely north of the Alps, never quite effacing more classical styles in Italy. In the late 14th century, the sophisticated court style of International Gothic developed, which continued to evolve until the late 15th century. In many areas, especially Germany, Late Gothic art continued well into the 16th century, before being subsumed into Renaissance art. Primary media in the Gothic period included sculpture, panel painting, stained glass, fresco and illuminated manuscripts. The easily recognisable shifts in architecture from Romanesque to Gothic, and Gothic to Renaissance styles, are typically used to define the periods in art in all media, although in many ways figurative art developed at a different pace.

The earliest Gothic art was monumental sculpture, on the walls of Cathedrals and abbeys. Christian art was often typological in nature (see Medieval allegory), showing the stories of the New Testament and the Old Testament side by side. Saints' lives were often depicted. Images of the Virgin Mary changed from the Byzantine iconic form to a more human and affectionate mother, cuddling her infant, swaying from her hip, and showing the refined manners of a well-born aristocratic courtly lady.

Secular art came into its own during this period with the rise of cities, foundation of universities, increase in trade, the establishment of a money-based economy and the creation of a bourgeois class who could afford to patronize the arts and commission works resulting in a proliferation of paintings and illuminated manuscripts. Increased literacy and a growing body of secular vernacular literature encouraged the representation of secular themes in art. With the growth of cities, trade guilds were formed and artists were often required to be members of a painters' guild—as a result, because of better record keeping, more artists are known to us by name in this period than any previous; some artists were even so bold as to sign their names.

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Gothic Home Design | House Design | Decor | Interior Layout | Furnitures

Gothic Home Design | House Design | Decor | Interior Layout | Furnitures | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
A gothic home design is a style of architecture. For a Gothic home design, the key is to select decorative elements that can be easily altered or removed in the event that the home is put up for sale and hosts potential buyers.
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Futurism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Futurism (Italian: Futurismo) was an artistic and social movement that originated in Italy in the early 20th century. It emphasized and glorified themes associated with contemporary concepts of the future, including speed, technology, youth and violence, and objects such as the car, the airplane and the industrial city. It was largely an Italian phenomenon, though there were parallel movements in Russia, England and elsewhere. The Futurists practiced in every medium of art, including painting, sculpture, ceramics, graphic design, industrial design, interior design, urban design, theatre, film, fashion, textiles, literature, music, architecture and even gastronomy. Key figures of the movement include the Italians Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Umberto Boccioni, Carlo Carrà, Gino Severini, Giacomo Balla, Antonio Sant'Elia, Bruno Munari and Luigi Russolo, and the Russians Natalia Goncharova, Velimir Khlebnikov, Igor Severyanin, David Burliuk, Aleksei Kruchenykh and Vladimir Mayakovsky, as well as the Portuguese Almada Negreiros. Important works include its seminal piece of the literature, Marinetti's Manifesto of Futurism, as well as Boccioni's sculpture, Unique Forms of Continuity in Space, and Balla's painting, Abstract Speed + Sound (pictured). Futurism influenced art movements such as Art Deco, Constructivism, Surrealism, Dada, and to a greater degree, Precisionism, Rayonism, and Vorticism.

The founder of Futurism was the Italian writer Filippo Tommaso Marinetti. Marinetti launched the movement in his Futurist Manifesto, which he published for the first time on 5 February 1909 in La gazzetta dell'Emilia, an article then reproduced in the French daily newspaper Le Figaro on 20 February 1909. He was soon joined by the painters Umberto Boccioni, Carlo Carrà, Giacomo Balla, Gino Severini and the composer Luigi Russolo.

Marinetti expressed a passionate loathing of everything old, especially political and artistic tradition. "We want no part of it, the past", he wrote, "we the young and strong Futurists!" The Futurists admired speed, technology, youth and violence, the car, the airplane and the industrial city, all that represented the technological triumph of humanity over nature, and they were passionate nationalists. They repudiated the cult of the past and all imitation, praised originality, "however daring, however violent", bore proudly "the smear of madness", dismissed art critics as useless, rebelled against harmony and good taste, swept away all the themes and subjects of all previous art, and gloried in science.

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Eclecticism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Eclecticism is a conceptual approach that does not hold rigidly to a single paradigm or set of assumptions, but instead draws upon multiple theories, styles, or ideas to gain complementary insights into a subject, or applies different theories in particular cases. It can sometimes seem inelegant or lacking in simplicity, and eclectics are sometimes criticized for lack of consistency in their thinking. It is, however, common in many fields of study. For example, most psychologists accept certain aspects of behaviorism, but do not attempt to use the theory to explain all aspects of human behavior. A statistician may use frequentist techniques on one occasion and Bayesian ones on another.

Eclecticism was first recorded to have been practiced by a group of ancient Greek and Roman philosophers who attached themselves to no real system, but selected from existing philosophical beliefs those doctrines that seemed most reasonable to them. Out of this collected material they constructed their new system of philosophy. The term comes from the Greek "ἐκλεκτικός" (eklektikos), literally "choosing the best"[2][3] and that from "ἐκλεκτός" (eklektos), "picked out, select".[4] Well known eclectics in Greek philosophy were the Stoics Panaetius and Posidonius, and the New Academics Carneades and Philo of Larissa. Among the Romans, Cicero was thoroughly eclectic, as he united the Peripatetic, Stoic, and New Academic doctrines. Further eclectics were Varro and Seneca.

The term eclecticism is used to describe the combination, in a single work, of elements from different historical styles, chiefly in architecture and, by implication, in the fine and decorative arts. The term is sometimes also loosely applied to the general stylistic variety of 19th century architecture after Neo-classicism (c. 1820),[5] although the revivals of styles in that period have, since the 1970s, generally been referred to as aspects of historicism.

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How to design a trendy eclectic kitchen - Telegraph

How to design a trendy eclectic kitchen - Telegraph | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
Have slick, perfectly matched kitchens seen their day? David Nicholls reveals the latest trend that kitchen designers have cooked up.
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De Stijl Design Ideas, Pictures, Remodel, and Decor

De Stijl Design Ideas, Pictures, Remodel, and Decor | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
The largest collection of interior design and decorating ideas on the Internet, including kitchens and bathrooms. Over 1,500,000 inspiring photos and 90,000 idea books from top designers around the world.
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Cubism in the Kitchen by Gemelli Design Studio - Design Milk

Cubism in the Kitchen by Gemelli Design Studio - Design Milk | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
A space-age, modern kitchen by Gemelli Design Studio that gives a good dose of cubism with an innovative concept design full of energetic green lines.
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modernism

modernism | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
Sera Oz is using Pinterest, an online pinboard to collect and share what inspires you.
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When Modernism Entered the Kitchen

When Modernism Entered the Kitchen | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
Cooking odors grow stronger as visitors approach the gallery where *Counter Space: Design and the Modern Kitchen*--a stimulating show at New York's Museum of Modern Art on food preparation in the twentieth-century home--is installed.
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Kuche Design's curator insight, February 13, 2014 10:26 AM

Beautiful and functional

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Minimalism in the Kitchen | Sponsored by bulthaup | Originally published in the June 2013 issue of Architectural Record | Architectural Record's Continuing Education Center

Minimalism in the Kitchen | Sponsored by bulthaup | Originally published in the June 2013 issue of Architectural Record | Architectural Record's Continuing Education Center | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
Architects & Engineers can earn AIA Continuing Education learning units by reading designated articles and sponsored sections in Architectural Record, GreenSource, and Engineering News-Record
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Futuristic Kitchen, futuristic design, faucet, future kitchen, futuristic design, modern kitchen, kitchen, modern, future, futuristic

Futuristic Kitchen, futuristic design, faucet, future kitchen, futuristic design, modern kitchen, kitchen, modern, future, futuristic | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
Futuristic Kitchen, futuristic design, faucet, future kitchen, futuristic design, modern kitchen, kitchen, modern, future, futuristic by Meryguapa on Indulgy.com
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Futuristic and Innovated Kitchen Design Ideas by Eggersmann

Futuristic and Innovated Kitchen Design Ideas by Eggersmann | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
Take a look on Eggersmann unique corian collection . Eggersmann is making in this collection a combination between the most modern manufacturing technologies and the traditional craftsmanship in order to present some innovated luxurious kitchens.
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Kitchen Workbook: 10 Elements of an Eclectic Kitchen

Kitchen Workbook: 10 Elements of an Eclectic Kitchen | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
Eclectic kitchens can come in wildly different flavors, from homespun to far flung. Consider these 10 a sample platter
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Eclectic Kitchen Design

Eclectic Kitchen Design | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
Eclectic Kitchen Design - What is it? Anything you want it to be! Check out this artist's unique kitchen to inspire a little wild and crazy in you
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De Stijl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

De Stijl (/də ˈstl/; Dutch pronunciation: [də ˈstɛil]), Dutch for "The Style", also known as neoplasticism, was a Dutch artistic movement founded in 1917. In a narrower sense, the term De Stijl is used to refer to a body of work from 1917 to 1931 founded in the Netherlands.[1][2]De Stijl is also the name of a journal that was published by the Dutch painter, designer, writer, and critic Theo van Doesburg (1883–1931), propagating the group's theories. Next to van Doesburg, the group's principal members were the painters Piet Mondrian (1872–1944), Vilmos Huszár (1884–1960), and Bart van der Leck (1876–1958), and the architects Gerrit Rietveld (1888–1964), Robert van 't Hoff (1887–1979), and J.J.P. Oud (1890–1963). The artistic philosophy that formed a basis for the group's work is known as neoplasticism — the new plastic art (or Nieuwe Beelding in Dutch).

Proponents of De Stijl sought to express a new utopian ideal of spiritual harmony and order. They advocated pure abstraction and universality by a reduction to the essentials of form and colour; they simplified visual compositions to the vertical and horizontal directions, and used only primary colors along with black and white. Indeed, according to the Tate Gallery's online article on neoplasticism, Mondrian himself sets forth these delimitations in his essay 'Neo-Plasticism in Pictorial Art'. He writes, "... this new plastic idea will ignore the particulars of appearance, that is to say, natural form and colour. On the contrary, it should find its expression in the abstraction of form and colour, that is to say, in the straight line and the clearly defined primary colour." The Tate article further summarizes that this art allows "only primary colours and non-colours, only squares and rectangles, only straight and horizontal or vertical line."[3] The Guggenheim Museum's online article on De Stijl summarizes these traits in similar terms: "It [De Stijl] was posited on the fundamental principle of the geometry of the straight line, the square, and the rectangle, combined with a strong asymmetricality; the predominant use of pure primary colors with black and white; and the relationship between positive and negative elements in an arrangement of non-objective forms and lines."[4]

The name De Stijl is supposedly derived from Gottfried Semper's Der Stil in den technischen und tektonischen Künsten oder Praktische Ästhetik (1861–3), which Curl[2] suggests was mistakenly believed to advocate materialism and functionalism. In general, De Stijl proposed ultimate simplicity and abstraction, both in architecture and painting, by using only straight horizontal and vertical lines and rectangular forms. Furthermore, their formal vocabulary was limited to the primary colours, red, yellow, and blue, and the three primary values, black, white, and grey. The works avoided symmetry and attained aesthetic balance by the use of opposition. This element of the movement embodies the second meaning of stijl: “a post, jamb or support”; this is best exemplified by the construction of crossing joints, most commonly seen in carpentry.

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Kitchen Design by Majid Boruzi Niyat at Coroflot.com

Kitchen Design by Majid Boruzi Niyat at Coroflot.com | BKDA  Continuing Professional Development Archive | Scoop.it
Kitchen Design with some inspirations from De Stijl movement.
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