birth control 1960
6.2K views | +2 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

cancer

Birth control pills reduce the risk of ovarian cancer, especially among women who use them for 5 years or more. These women have about half the risk of getting ovarian cancer compared with women who never used the pill.

 

Birth control pills can prevent ovarian cancer. We think that one of the mechanisms that women are at risk for ovarian cancer is constant ovulation. In other words, ovulation that is never interrupted with a pregnancy or medications. All birth control, including pills, patches, injections and rings can all achieve the same protection by stopping ovulation. The longer that you stay on birth control pills, the more protection you get.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

Birth Control Pill: Oral Contraceptive Use May Be Safe, But Information Gaps Remain

Introduced in the 1960s, oral contraceptives have been used by about 80 percent of women in the United States at some point in their lives. For women without pre-existing risks for heart disease, the early formulations were generally safe, and the newer ones appear to be even safer, but all the risks and benefits are yet to be established, especially as women's lifestyles change and new forms of contraceptives become available, according to specialists in women's heart disease at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

How Does the Pill Work?

Most birth control pills are "combination pills" containing a combination of the hormones estrogen and progesterone to prevent ovulation (the release of an egg during the monthly cycle). A female cannot get pregnant if she doesn't ovulate because there is no egg to be fertilized. The Pill also works by thickening the mucus around the cervix, which makes it difficult for sperm to enter the uterus and reach any eggs that may have been released. The hormones in the Pill can also sometimes affect the lining of the uterus, making it difficult for an egg to attach to the wall of the uterus.

Most combination pills come in either a 21-day pack or a 28-day pack. One hormone pill is taken each day at about the same time for 21 days. Depending on the pack, the birth control pills are either stopped for 7 days or a pill that contains no hormones is taken for 7 days. During the week that the female is taking no pills or pills that don't contain hormones, she has her period. Some women prefer the schedule in which pills are taken every day of the month because it helps keep them in the habit of taking a pill every day.

Also available is a combination pill that reduces the frequency of a woman's period by supplying a hormone pill for 12 weeks and then inactive pills for 7 days. This reduces the number of periods to one every 3 months instead of one every month.

Another kind of pill that may change the number of monthly periods is the low-dose progesterone pill, sometimes called the minipill. This differs from other birth control pills in that it only contains one type of hormone — progesterone — rather than a combination of estrogen and progesterone. It works by changing the cervical mucus and the lining of the uterus, and sometimes by affecting ovulation as well. It may be slightly less effective than the combination pills at preventing pregnancy.

The minipill is taken every day without a break. A girl who is taking the minipill may have no period at all or she may have irregular periods. In order for the minipill to work, it must be taken at the same time every day, without missing any doses.

Every type of birth control pill works best when it is taken every single day at the same time of day, regardless of whether a female is going to have sex. This is especially important with progesterone-only pills. It's very important that your daughter not take anyone else's pills. If pills are skipped or forgotten, she is not protected against pregnancy and she will need a backup form of birth control, such as condoms, or she will need to stop having sex for a while.

For the first 7 days of taking the Pill, a girl should use an additional form of contraception, such as condoms, to prevent pregnancy. After 7 days, the Pill should work alone to prevent pregnancy. But continuing to use condoms will protect against STDS.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

cartoon

cartoon | birth control 1960 | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

The Creation of the Pill

Gregory Pincus was an American physician, biologist, and researcher during the 20th century. Early in his career he began studying hormonal biology and steroidal hormones, but his first breakthrough came in 1934 when was able to produce in vitro fertilization in rabbits. In 1953, Margaret Sanger and Katherine McCormick confronted Pincus with the idea of creating an oral contraceptive. He sought out Searle, a pharmaceutical company, about funding for their plan. Searle's initial reaction was 'no' because it jeopardized his company due to the austere birth control laws. Despite the fact that Searle had no intention of creating an oral contraceptive, Frank Colton, a chemist at the company, accidentally developed a type of one. Pincus was allowed to have samples of the drug for his research and in 1957 The Pill was released as a treatment for gynecological disorders. Finally, in 1960, it became FDA approved and by 1963, 1.2 million women were using it. Although Searle was originally reluctant to fund research for an oral contraceptive, he soon reaped the rewards of the newly invented Pill, and monopolized the industry for a short time.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

may 9,1960

may 9,1960 | birth control 1960 | Scoop.it

1960: The birth control pill wins the approval of the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA gives its blessing to the 10-milligram dose of Enovid, which by then had been in clinical trials for four years, and the Searle drug company starts selling the pill a month later.

The pill, which was nearly 100 percent effective, nevertheless came with some severe side effects, including life-threatening blood clots. Further research found that the approved dose was 10 times too high.

The first pill was developed from synthetic progesterone, which itself derived from the steroid that occurs naturally in the human fertility cycle.

Science continued refining the pill until, by the 1980s, safer and effective lower-dose variants were available. Other birth-control methods evolved as well, including the T-shaped intrauterine device, although they fell out of favor after one of them -– the Dalkon Shield –- was found to cause pelvic inflammatory disease.

Today’s woman can still opt for the pill in various forms, although the birth-control patch -– which slowly releases hormones through the skin –- is proving equally effective

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

thesis statement

When the FDA regulated margaret sanger's birth control pill in 1960 new opportunites came about for women because they can now regulate their cycle, plan/manage family sizes and provide medical benefits like reduce cervical cancer.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

TAKING CONTROL

In the United States, the teenage pregnancy rate is higher than in many other countries. Approximately 750,000 teen girls become pregnant every year and most of them don't intend to. In addition to preventing unplanned pregnancies, sexually active teens must protect themselves from STDs — which means that condoms must be used every time.

The most effective method of birth control is abstinence. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has said that sex education that includes information about both abstinence and birth control is the most effective way to keep down the rate of teen pregnancy

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

different types of birth control

different types of birth control | birth control 1960 | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

On This Day: FDA Approves First Birth Control Pill

On May 9, 1960, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced pending approval of the first oral contraceptive, paving the way for the sexual revolution of the 1960s.

As the first “non-barrier” contraceptive method and almost 100 percent effective, “the pill” revolutionized birth control by allowing couples much greater freedom and spontaneity. “[I]n a mere six years it has changed and liberated the sex and family life of a large and still growing segment of the U.S. population,” wrote Time in 1967.

The most serious side effects of the pill are an increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure and blood clots. Arguably less severe side effects include “headaches, breast tenderness, nausea, vomiting, bloating, decreased sex drive (libido) and depression,” according to the site.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

Dangerous pills OK’d by FDA panel

The way the feds are glossing over serious problems with newer birth control drugs, you’d think Priority #1 at the FDA is making sure Americans don’t have babies (which isn’t as far from the truth as you might believe).

First, an FDA panel voted to keep a dangerous birth control pill on the market despite the fact that it can TRIPLE the risk of the blood clots that can cause heart attacks and stroke — as long as that risk is mentioned in the warning info that no one reads anyway.

The drug is drospirenone, already on the market under names like Yaz and Yasmin, and this isn’t the first time it’s been let off the hook despite big-time problems.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Michelle Noble
Scoop.it!

birth control

Birth control refers to the means used to limit or space human fertility. The technological development of these means, the organization of their use, and the fairness of their application are the province of scientists, policymakers, religious leaders, and the users of birth control. The definition includes recent methods such as condoms, sterilization, intrauterine devices, and the birth control pill. It also includes older methods, such as abortion, prolonged nursing of infants, periodic abstinence from sex, herbal tonics, and coitus interruptus.

more...
No comment yet.