Biotech in China
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Researchers from Singapore and China find a new esophageal cancer biomarker

Researchers from Singapore and China find a new esophageal cancer biomarker | Biotech in China | Scoop.it

Researchers in Singapore and China are putting into play a new biomarker that appears to help spot a common form of esophageal cancer. It also enables clinicians to identify patients with the disease facing dicey survival prospects.

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New Plant Biotechnology Study Findings Recently Were Reported by Researchers at Wuhan University

According to news reporting originating in Wuhan, People's Republic of China, by NewsRx journalists, research stated, "Molecular Pharming, the production of recombinant pharmaceuticals through plant biotechnology, has the potential to transform the biologics sector of the pharmaceutical industry. More fascinating however, is how it might be used to improve access to modern medicines, and improve health of the poor in developing countries and emerging economies."

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PLOS ONE: GLI1 and Contributes to GLI1-Driven EMT in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

PLOS ONE: GLI1 and Contributes to GLI1-Driven EMT in Hepatocellular Carcinoma | Biotech in China | Scoop.it

Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) has been recently identified to be over-expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and promote HCC cell motility and invasion ability via inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). However, the mechanism of aberrant overexpression of Cav-1 remains vague. Here, we observed that Cav-1 expression was positively associated with GLI1 expression in HCC tissues. Forced expression of GLI1 up-regulated Cav-1 in Huh7 cells, while knockdown of GLI1 decreased expression of Cav-1 in SNU449 cells. Additionally, silencing Cav-1 abolished GLI1-induced EMT of Huh7 cells.

 

The correlation between GLI1 and Cav-1 was confirmed in tumor specimens from HCC patients and Cav-1 was found to be associated with poor prognosis after hepatic resection. The relationship between protein expression of GLI1 and Cav-1 was also established in HCC xenografts of nude mice. These results suggest that GLI1 may be attributed to Cav-1 up-regulation which plays an important role in GLI1-driven EMT phenotype in HCC.

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JHL Biotech and BioLineRx Partner on MAb for Diabetes

JHL Biotech, a Taiwan-China biotech, announced a collaboration with BioLineRx (NASDAQ: BLRX; TASE: BLRX) of Israel to develop BL-9020, a novel monoclonal antibody that treats Type 1 diabetes.

 

JHL Biotech will be the global manufacturer of BL-9020 and also own rights to the drug in China and Southeast Asia. BioLineRx will have development and commercialization rights in the rest of the world.

 

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Bayer and Peking University establish new research center for translational research and drug discovery in Beijing

Bayer HealthCare and Peking University (PKU), Beijing, China, have signed a comprehensive collaboration agreement on a three-year strategic partnership to promote translational research for drug discovery.


Under this agreement, the two partners will establish a joint research center at Peking University under the name Bayer HealthCare/Peking University Center of Translational Research for Drug Discovery (BPC/TRDD).

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The All China Biotech Conference & Exhibition

Shuffling on the Chinese bio pharmaceutical industry makes room for international companies. http://t.co/SUfPxbi2lE


Via Marco Antonio Gonzalez
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Marco Antonio Gonzalez's curator insight, January 22, 2014 3:19 AM

Powerfull growth in China pharmaceutical industry

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Inside B.G.I., China’s Genomics Factory

Inside B.G.I., China’s Genomics Factory | Biotech in China | Scoop.it
A Chinese firm’s bid to crack hunger, illness, evolution—and the genetics of human intelligence.

 

The twenty-mile drive from Hong Kong International Airport to the center of Shenzhen, in southern China, can take hours. There is customs to negotiate and a border to cross, but they aren’t the problem; the problem is the furious pace of commerce between the former British colony and one of the fastest-growing cities in the world. Trucks, cars, vans, and buses cram the roadways, ferrying laborers of all kinds at all times. Until the nineteen-eighties, when Deng Xiaoping designated the area as China’s first special economic zone, Shenzhen had been a tiny fishing village. Suddenly, eleven million people appeared, seemingly out of nowhere; factories sprang up, often housed in hastily constructed tower blocks.


Thirty years ago, there were a few guesthouses and little else. Today, a visitor can stay at the Four Seasons or the Ritz, shop for ten-thousand-dollar handbags at Hermès, and move around town in a chauffeured Bentley. Yet Shenzhen has remained a factory town. At various times, the city has served as China’s Detroit, its garment district, and its Silicon Valley. Now, as the world’s scientists focus with increasing intensity on transforming the genetic codes of every living creature into information that can be used to treat and ultimately prevent disease, Shenzhen is home to a different kind of factory: B.G.I., formerly called Beijing Genomics Institute, the world’s largest genetic-research center. With a hundred and seventy-eight machines to sequence the precise order of the billions of chemicals within a molecule of DNA, B.G.I. produces at least a quarter of the world’s genomic data—more than Harvard University, the National Institutes of Health, or any other scientific institution.

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China Solicits Comments On Good Supply Practices For Medical Devices - Food, Drugs, Healthcare, Life Sciences - United States

The China Food and Drug Administration (the "CFDA") recently published a draft regulation, Good Supply Practices for Medical Devices (the "Draft GSP"), for public comment through January 20, 2014.


The first-ever regulation issued by the CFDA on minimum standards for device distribution, the Draft GSP sets forth requirements for procurement, delivery acceptance, storage, sales, transportation, and after-sales services.

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Initial public offerings ban in China lifted, 2014 could be record year

HONG KONG – After a lost 2013, companies in China are expected to start issuing shares again this year and this could prove a boon to biopharmaceutical companies that are generally underrepresented in the markets in Shanghai and Shenzhen.

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