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Ndemic Creations: Plague Inc.

Ndemic Creations: Plague Inc. | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it

Plague Inc. es un juego en el que uno asume el papel de un microrganismo (bacterias, virus, hongos, parásitos...) con el fin de infectar a la población mundial y eliminarla.

 

Aunque parezca que no, uno puede aprender bastante de este juego: mecanismos de patogenicidad de diferentes microrganismos, formas en la que se expande una enfermedad y que elementos pueden favorecerla, como afecta la genética del organismo al desarrollo de una terapia efectiva...

 

 Un juego de estrategia completamente recomendable.

 


Via Roberto Fernández Crespo
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"Biotech and Mol Bio"
Research and innovation in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (by @ramossonia)
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El Supermercado de la Ciencia: ¿Soy un organismo modificado genéticamente?

El Supermercado de la Ciencia: ¿Soy un organismo modificado genéticamente? | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it

Todos los estudiantes de Biotecnología Alimentaria han participado en crear esta actividad en la que también he participado y contribuido, esperamos que sirva para difundir conocimiento y reflexionar sobre lo que aporta la Ingeniería Genética a nuestra sociedad.

sonia ramos's insight:

Hoy os planteamos un reto, un juego. A través de unas imágenes podréis intentar adivinar si un producto ha sido modificado genéticamente o no, tras cada imagen obtendréis la respuesta.

 

Probad suerte o conocimientos y luego comentar!!

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Modifying the Endless Debate Over Genetically Modified Crops | TIME.com

Modifying the Endless Debate Over Genetically Modified Crops | TIME.com | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it
GM crops have become a symbol: either you're for agribusiness or you're against science. But for all the heat, GM crops are something much simpler: one of many tools we need to explore to meet the farming challenges of tomorrow.
sonia ramos's insight:

Parece la historia interminable, sin embargo la revista Time se hace eco del especial publicado este mes de Mayo de 2013 en la revista Nature para plantear un cambio de perspectiva.

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New device can extract human DNA with full genetic data in minutes

New device can extract human DNA with full genetic data in minutes | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it

Take a swab of saliva from your mouth and within minutes your DNA could be ready for analysis and genome sequencing with the help of a new device.

 

University of Washington engineers and NanoFacture, a Bellevue, Wash., company, have created a device that can extract human DNA from fluid samples in a simpler, more efficient and environmentally friendly way than conventional methods.

 

The device will give hospitals and research labs a much easier way to separate DNA from human fluid samples, which will help with genome sequencing, disease diagnosis and forensic investigations.

 

“It’s very complex to extract DNA,” said Jae-Hyun Chung, a UW associate professor of mechanical engineering who led the research. “When you think of the current procedure, the equivalent is like collecting human hairs using a construction crane.”

 

This technology aims to clear those hurdles. The small, box-shaped kit now is ready for manufacturing, then eventual distribution to hospitals and clinics. NanoFacture, a UW spinout company, signed a contract with Korean manufacturer KNR Systems last month at aceremony in Olympia, Wash.

 

The UW, led by Chung, spearheaded the research and invention of the technology, and still manages the intellectual property. Separating DNA from bodily fluids is a cumbersome process that’s become a bottleneck as scientists make advances in genome sequencing, particularly for disease prevention and treatment. The market for DNA preparation alone is about $3 billion each year.

 

Conventional methods use a centrifuge to spin and separate DNA molecules or strain them from a fluid sample with a micro-filter, but these processes take 20 to 30 minutes to complete and can require excessive toxic chemicals.

 

UW engineers designed microscopic probes that dip into a fluid sample – saliva, sputum or blood – and apply an electric field within the liquid. That draws particles to concentrate around the surface of the tiny probe. Larger particles hit the tip and swerve away, but DNA-sized molecules stick to the probe and are trapped on the surface. It takes two or three minutes to separate and purify DNA using this technology.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
sonia ramos's insight:

Los avances en genética y ciencias afines junto con el desarrollo de tecnologías vinculadas, es cada vez más rápido y específico, no dejará de sorprenderme.,.

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Biosciencia's curator insight, May 15, 2013 7:25 AM

The device will give hospitals and research labs a much easier way to separate DNA from human fluid samples, which will help with genome sequencing, disease diagnosis and forensic investigations.

Linda Coburn's comment, May 15, 2013 11:28 AM
It bothers me that an American university which receives American tax dollars for funding has decided to contract with a Korean company to manufacture this amazing device. We will never solve our economic woes if we don't bring mfg back to the US.
Center for Accessible Living NKY's curator insight, May 15, 2013 5:29 PM

This should make obtaining genetic diagnosis much easier and faster.

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From Chemical Weapons to Chemotherapy: An Unexpected Journey - Prof. Robert Stockman

From deadly nightshade to eye surgery and truth drugs; from poison gas to pesticides and cancer therapy; from explosives to treatments for heart disease; from natural toxins to new starting points for drug discovery. The unexpected relationship between chemical weapons and medicines will be explored, interspersed with curious parallels drawn from the speaker's 20 years of being a chemist.

Oxford University Scientific Society website: http://users.ox.ac.uk/~science/
OUSS Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/OUSciSoc
Robert Stockman: http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/chemistry/people/robert.stockman


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
sonia ramos's insight:

El profesor Dr. Robert Stockman, desde la Sociedad Científica de la Universidad de Oxford y, a través de su canal de youtube OU SciSoc (http://bit.ly/10laYAS) divulga la enorme potencialidad de la química para aplicarse en campos tan radicalmente distintos.


El esfuerzo por parte de científicos de todo el mundo y por Universidades y Centros de Investigación en hacer llegar la ciencia a todos, en divulgación y difusión es admirable y un ejemplo a seguir. En la actualidad quien no sabe es quien no quiere aprender...

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Extrapolation of genetic complexity of organisms to earlier times suggests that life began before the Earth was formed

Extrapolation of genetic complexity of organisms to earlier times suggests that life began before the Earth was formed | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it

Applying a maxim from computer science to biology raises the intriguing possibility that life existed before Earth did. An extrapolation of the genetic complexity of organisms to earlier times suggests that life began before the Earth was formed. Life may have started from systems with single heritable elements that are functionally equivalent to a nucleotide. The genetic complexity, roughly measured by the number of non-redundant functional nucleotides, is expected to have grown exponentially due to several positive feedback factors: gene cooperation, duplication of genes with their subsequent specialization, and emergence of novel functional niches associated with existing genes. Linear regression of genetic complexity on a log scale extrapolated back to just one base pair suggests the time of the origin of life 9.7 billion years ago. This cosmic time scale for the evolution of life has important consequences: (i) Life took ca. 5 billion years to reach the complexity of bacteria; (ii) the environments in which life originated and evolved to the prokaryote stage may have been quite different from those envisaged on Earth; (iii) there was no intelligent life in our universe prior to the origin of Earth, thus Earth could not have been deliberately seeded with life by intelligent aliens; (iv) Earth was seeded by panspermia; (v) experimental replication of the origin of life from scratch may have to emulate many cumulative rare events; and (vi) the Drake equation for guesstimating the number of civilizations in the universe is likely wrong, as intelligent life has just begun appearing in our universe.

 

Evolution of advanced organisms has accelerated via development of additional information-processing systems: epigenetic memory, primitive mind, multicellular brain, language, books, computers, and Internet. As a result the doubling time of complexity has reached ca. 20 years. Finally, the research team discusses the issue of the predicted technological singularity and give a biosemiotics perspective on the increase of complexity.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Hidden layer of genome unveils how plants may adapt to environments throughout the world

Hidden layer of genome unveils how plants may adapt to environments throughout the world | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it
Hidden layer of genome unveils how plants may adapt to environments throughout the world

Via R K Upadhyay, Mary Williams
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Mary Williams's comment, March 8, 2013 3:51 AM
Here's a nice summary from Scientific American: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=can-epigentics-help-crops-adapt-to-climate-change
sonia ramos's comment, March 8, 2013 4:19 AM
Thanks for the Scientific American link. I do not work on it but I found it fascinating. Evolution and adaptation throgh epigenetics. And interesting thought about epigenetics like diversity source, should be a good research line
Nanci J. Ross's curator insight, August 12, 2013 12:27 PM

This would be cool to study as a biogeography question!

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McGraw Hill Animations - Phloem Loading, osmosis, water uptake and mineral uptake

McGraw Hill Animations - Phloem Loading, osmosis, water uptake and mineral uptake | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it

Just in case you hadn't found these already - useful for teaching about plant transport!


Via Mary Williams
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sonia ramos's comment, February 22, 2013 4:08 AM
Great educational resource!
Mary Williams's comment, February 22, 2013 5:17 AM
I agree - it works better than my usual method, which involves lots of moving my arms up and down and making "whooshing" noises...
Kristin Ruschhaupt's curator insight, December 2, 2013 11:22 AM

must watch clips!!!

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La canción del DNA

@MrSCIENZA Con videos como este dan ganas de estudiar el ADN http://t.co/z8CM119gsl
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Las 10 revoluciones tecnológicas de 2013

Las 10 revoluciones tecnológicas de 2013 | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it

El Consejo de la Agenda Global sobre Tecnologías Emergentes del Foro Económico Mundial ha identificado las 10 tecnologías que, en 2013, prometen dar pasos decisivos para lograr avances inconcebibles hace apenas una década en campos como la medicina, la producción energética, la industria manufacturera, la seguridad vial, la lucha contra el cambio climático.... Por VICTOR BARREIRA

18 FEB 2013 - 21:49 CET

 

Fuente

http://tecnologia.elpais.com/tecnologia/2013/02/18/actualidad/1361218651_738532.html

 

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sonia ramos's curator insight, February 20, 2013 1:07 PM

Nutrición mejorada a nivel molecular
Incluso en los países desarrollados millones de personas sufren malnutrición debido a deficiencias nutritivas en sus dietas. Ahora, nuevas técnicas genómicas pueden determinar, al nivel de la secuencia génica, el amplio número de proteínas consumidas que son importantes en la dieta humana. Las proteínas identificadas pueden tener ventajas sobre los suplementos proteicos estándar, como proveer un gran porcentaje de aminoácidos esenciales. También han mejorado la solubilidad, el sabor y la textura. La producción a gran escala de proteínas dietéticas para humanos, basada en la aplicación de biotecnología a la nutrición molecular, puede alumbrar beneficios para la salud como el desarrollo muscular, el control de la diabetes o la reducción de la obesidad.

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Is there life on other cells?

Is there life on other cells? | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it
sonia ramos's insight:

Un poco de humor científico no viene mal a mitad de semana

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Food science expert: Genetically modified crops are overregulated | News Bureau | University of Illinois

Food science expert: Genetically modified crops are overregulated | News Bureau | University of Illinois | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it
The News Bureau, part of Public Affairs, generates and coordinates news coverage of the Urbana-Champaign campus
sonia ramos's insight:

RT @tapasdeciencia: Los alimentos modificados genéticamente son seguros para los humanos y el medio ambiente, y están sobrerregulados

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La cara positiva de los priones

La cara positiva de los priones | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it
Descubierta la función biológica de las proteínas que causan el mal de las vacas locas. Un estudio muestra que tienen un papel en el mantenimiento de la mielina

 

Un trabajo que publicaJournal of Neuroscience, y que reseñaNature, explica al menos una de las funciones que desempeñan estas proteínas en nuestro sistema nervioso: son parte de la plasticidad del cerebro, en concreto, porque ayudan a mantener la mielina, una capa protectora de las neuronas.


Via Ramon Aragon
sonia ramos's insight:

Genial avance en la investigación sobre priones. Todo tiene su lado positivo.

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sonia ramos's comment, February 18, 2013 7:00 AM
Genial aportación en tu Scoop. Muy interesante el descubrimiento de esta función... si es que estamos aún en pañales en cuanto a todo lo referente a los priones. Gracias, ya lo he "rescopeado"
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FIONA and other super-high resolution microscopy techniques

FIONA and other super-high resolution microscopy techniques | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it

Methodology designed to circumnavigate the classical Abbe diffraction barrier in optical microscopy is rapidly advancing using both ensemble and single-molecule techniques.

 

Over the past several decades, fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool for examining a wide variety of biological molecules, pathways, and dynamics in living cells, tissues, and whole animals. In contrast to other techniques (such as electron microscopy), fluorescence imaging is compatible with cells that are being maintained in culture, which enables minimally invasive optical-based observation of events occurring on a large span of timescales. In terms of spatial resolution, several techniques including positron-emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and optical coherence tomography can generate images of animal and human subjects at resolutions between 10 centimeters and 10 micrometers, whereas electron microscopy and scanning probe techniques feature the highest spatial resolution, often approaching the molecular and atomic levels (see Figure ). Between these two extremes in resolving power lies optical microscopy. Aside from the benefits derived from being able to image living cells, the most significant drawback to all forms of fluorescence microscopy (including widefield, laser scanning, spinning disk, multiphoton, and total internal reflection) are the limits to spatial resolution that were first elucidated and described by Ernst Abbe in the late 1800s.

 

The Abbe diffraction limit (or at least the recognition of this limit) stood for almost a century before inventive microscopists began to examine how their instruments could be improved to circumvent the physical barriers in order to achieve higher resolution. Due to the fact that axial resolution is far lower than lateral resolution (by at least a factor of two), much of the work conducted in the latter part of the twentieth century addressed improvements to performance in the axial dimension. Researchers discovered that laser scanning confocal instruments produced very modest increases in resolution at the cost of signal-to-noise, and that other associated technologies (including multiphoton, structured illumination, and spinning disk) could be used for optical sectioning, but without significant improvement in axial resolution. An important concept to note, and one of the most underappreciated facts associated with optical imaging in biology, is that the achieved microscope resolution often does not reach the physical limit imposed by diffraction. This is due to the fact that optical inhomogeneities in the specimen can distort the phase of the excitation beam, leading to a focal volume that is significantly larger than the diffraction-limited ideal. Furthermore, resolution can also be compromised by improper alignment of the microscope, the use of incompatible immersion oil, coverslips having a thickness outside the optimum range, and improperly adjusted correction collars.

 

The most significant advances in superresolution imaging have been achieved in what is termed far-field microscopy and involve either spatially or temporally modulating the transition between two molecular states of a fluorophore (such as switching between a dark and bright state) or by physically reducing the size of the point-spread function used in the excitation illumination. Among the methods that improve resolution by PSF modification, the most important techniques are referred to by the acronyms STED (stimulated emission depletion; from the Stefan Hell laboratory) and SSIM (saturated structured illumination microscopy; pioneered by Mats Gustafsson). Techniques that rely on the detection and precise localization of single molecules include PALM (photoactivated localization microscopy; introduced by Eric Betzig and Harald Hess) and STORM (stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy; first reported by Xiaowei Zhang). As will be discussed, there are many variations on these techniques, as well as advanced methods that can combine or even improve the performance of existing imaging schemes. Even more importantly, new superresolution techniques are being introduced with almost breathtaking speed (relative to traditional advances in microscopy) and it is not unreasonable to suggest that at some point in the near future, resolution of a single nanometer may well be attainable in commercial instruments.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Chris Upton + helpers
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Introducción a la Microscopía de Alta Resolución y técnicas de ultra-alta resolución

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A Subway Map Of The Metabolism [Infographic] | Popular Science

A Subway Map Of The Metabolism [Infographic] | Popular Science | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it

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Specials : Nature

Specials : Nature | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it
GM CROPS: PROMISE AND REALITY

The introduction of the first transgenic plant 30 years ago heralded the start of a second green revolution, providing food to the starving, profits to farmers and environmental benefits to boot. Many GM crops fulfilled the promise. But their success has been mired in controversy with many questioning their safety, their profitability and their green credentials. A polarized debate has left little room for consensus. In this special issue, Nature explores the hopes, the fears, the reality and the future.

 

Image credit: Kelly Krause/Nature (photo: Nagy-Bagoly Arpad/Shutterstock)

 

EDITORIALFields of gold

Research on transgenic crops must be done outside industry if it is to fulfil its early promise.

Nature ( 02 May 2013 )

NEWSTransgenic salmon nears approval

Slow US regulatory process highlights hurdles of getting engineered food animals to dinner tables.

Nature ( 02 May 2013 )

NEWS FEATURESGM crops: A story in numbers

Genetically modified crops have gained ground on their conventional counterparts, but the vast majority are grown in five countries, featuring four crops and two principal traits.

Nature ( 02 May 2013 )

Case studies: A hard look at GM crops

Superweeds? Suicides? Stealthy genes? The true, the false and the still unknown about transgenic crops.

Nature ( 02 May 2013 )

Transgenic crops: A new breed

The next wave of genetically modified crops is making its way to market — and might just ease concerns over 'Frankenfoods'.

Nature ( 02 May 2013 )

COMMENTARIESAfrica and Asia need a rational debate on GM crops

Policy-makers in developing countries should not be swayed by the politicized arguments dominant in Europe, say Christopher J.M. Whitty and colleagues.

Nature ( 02 May 2013 )

An experiment for the world

China’s scientists are using a variety of approaches to boost crop yields and limit environmental damage, say Fusuo Zhang, Xinping Chen and Peter Vitousek.

Nature ( 02 May 2013 )

CORRESPONDENCEBiotechnology: Thirty years of transgenic plants

To overcome today’s huge agricultural hurdles we should move to a model that combines the best features of transgenic technology with those of organic and conventional farming.

Nature ( 02 May 2013 )

PERSPECTIVEUsing membrane transporters to improve crops for sustainable food production

This Perspective discusses the emerging advances in plant membrane transporters, which can be used to improve crop yields, nutritional value, and environmental stress resistance.

Nature ( 02 May 2013 )

NATURE PODCASTNature Podcast: GM crops

Case studies reveal if genes really escape from the fields where GM crops are grown, and if their use really leads to a drop in pesticide use.

Nature ( 02 May 2013 )

ARCHIVESeed-patent case in Supreme Court

Loss of patent control could rekindle ‘terminator’ technology.

Nature ( 19 February 2013 )

Food: Inside the hothouses of industry

Feeding the world is going to require the scientific and financial muscle of agricultural biotechnology companies. Natasha Gilbert asks whether they're up to the task.

Nature ( 28 July 2010 )

A new dawn for transgenic crops in Europe?

Approval of the Amflora potato could signal a fresh approach to genetically modified organisms.

Nature ( 09 March 2010 )

GM crops: Battlefield

Papers suggesting that biotech crops might harm the environment attract a hail of abuse from other scientists. Emily Waltz asks if the critics fight fair.

Nature ( 02 September 2009 )

sonia ramos's insight:

La revista Nature dedica un especial a los cultivos modificados genéticamente, digno de leer!

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sonia ramos's comment, May 23, 2013 11:23 AM
merci pour la lecture de ce Scoop
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Dogma Central de la Biología Molecular - Citología y Genética - Educatina

Dogma Central de la Biología Molecular - Citología y Genética - Educatina | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it
En este video se explica cómo la información genética contenida en el ADN pasa al ARN y por último a las proteínas.
sonia ramos's insight:

Este tipo de vídeos son interesantes recursos docentes que pueden servir de apoyo en las explicaciones.

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AP: Advanced Placement Biology - Educator.com

AP: Advanced Placement Biology - Educator.com | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it
Innovative educational service website designed to recreate the live learning experience on the web.
AP: Advanced Placement Biology
with: Dr. Carleen Eaton

Dr. Carleen Eaton utilizes her M.D. from the UCLA School of Medicine to bring in real world applications and examples for her AP Biology class. Carleen covers all the AP tested topics from cell structure to evolution to the laboratory review. Dr. Eaton has been teaching math and science for over 10 years and has won numerous "Teacher of the Year" awards and is consistently ranked as one of the top instructors in California. This course is indispensable for the student looking to ace the AP Biology test as Carleen covers the important concepts with fully illustrated diagrams before going in-depth into problems encountered in the multiple choice and free response sections. Topics also include Cell Structure, Genetics, Plants, Physiology, Behavior, and Ecology.


Via Balqis Thaahaveettil
sonia ramos's insight:

Esta profesora de la UCLA es un ejemplo a seguir, muestra en Open Access un curso sobre Biología muy completo en temario, NO ESCRITO sino con sus explicaciones y apoyándose en figuras e incluso incluye prácticas de laboratorio.

 

Impresionante este trabajo de la Dra Carleen Eaton.

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Spanish National Research Council to grow transgenic wheat for celiacs - Materia (2013)

Manuel Ansede 09/05/2013 

Científicos del organismo solicitan permiso para cultivar un trigo transgénico apto para celíacos en una parcela de Córdoba. La cosecha, media tonelada de grano, servirá para elaborar galletas y llevar a cabo un ensayo clínico con pacientes. Los investigadores creen que el cereal podría llegar al mercado en cinco años.


 

Scientists of the agency are seeking permission to cultivate a GM wheat suitable for coeliacs on a plot of Córdoba. The harvest, half a ton of grain serve to develop and carry out a clinical trial with patients. Researchers believe that the cereal could reach the market within five years... 

 

CSIC scientists have requested permission to plant there, on a plot of 1,000 square meters, wheat whose genes have been modified so that it can be consumed by people with celiac disease, a currently incurable disease of unknown origin that affects about 1% of the world population.

 

When people with celiac disease consume gluten - a protein found in wheat, barley and rye - their body's defenses react and damage the intestine. As a result, there are diarrhea, vomiting and unexplained weight loss until it is given to the cause. Their only option now is to eat gluten-free foods that are more expensive. Celiacs spent each year 1,600 euros more on food than the other people. In the U.S. alone, the market for gluten-free foods moved 4,200 billion in 2012.

 

To remedy this, a team from the Institute of Sustainable Agriculture Cordoba, led by biologist Francisco Barro, has since 2004 investigating transgenic wheat varieties without gluten. In 2011, researchers announced that they had obtained varieties capable of producing in celiacs "a reaction up to 95% less toxic than natural wheat", according to laboratory results.

 

Now, Barro has asked the National Biosafety Commission for a permit to grow wheat for the first time outdoors. His goal is to harvest half a ton of grain to make crackers that will be used to conduct a clinical trial with celiacs. The test, if all goes as planned, will be held for three months with between 30 and 60 patients, who will be able to taste wheat again, until now forbidden to them, in a trial coordinated by medical Queen Sofía Hospital. The biologist believes his cereal could reach the market within five years.

 

Barro is aware that its GM wheat "has no chance in Europe", the continent most reluctant to genetically modified organisms. Five countries - USA, Canada, Argentina, Brazil and India - grabbing global GM production, with 152 million hectares.

 

Europe only allows the cultivation of two GM crops: modified corn by the U.S. company Monsanto to be resistant to insect infestation and a starch potato from German chemicals company BASF for paper and textile industries. However, following a hypocritical policy, Brussels does support importing about 40 GM products from other countries.

 

The CSIC has sold the license to exploit the patent for its GM wheat, to a British company, Plant Bioscience Limited, based in Norwich. "Possibly, their strategy will be to cultivate our wheat in the U.S., Argentina and China, and they will sell the flour to Spain for the price of gold", speculates Barro.

 

According to preliminary studies, "in the worst case, a celiac can [at least] eat every day three slices of bread made from the modified wheat". Barro team has organized a blind tasting with 11 tasters, who were unable to distinguish the normal wheat bread from the one baked with transgenic cereals.

 

To prevent the escape of genetically modified wheat from the plot... CSIC scientists impose a safety distance of 200 meters to any other plot with cereal. Barro considered very unlikely that there is a leak, because "wheat pollen is heavy" and cannot travel long distances on the wind. 

 

Wheat suitable for coeliacs has its genes modified to suppress the proteins responsible for the allergic response of celiacs, gliadins. "It would be surprising that this feature gave the GM wheat a competitive advantage over the normal wheat [if it escapes]," says Barro... "There are anti-GMO environmentalists, who are celiacs, who called me to try our wheat," says Barro... 

 

Original article in Spanish: 
http://esmateria.com/2013/05/09/el-csic-pide-cultivar-trigo-transgenico-para-celiacos/
 


Via Alexander J. Stein, Norman Warthmann
sonia ramos's insight:

Hay mucho trabajo que hacer sobre los trangénicos, unos debemos acercarlos más a la población explicando los controles y la legislación, las pruebas y el tiempo de experimientación sobre su efectos y, otros, abriendo  perspectivas e informándose.

 

Este tema lleva mucha desinformación detrás y se están perdidendo oportunidades de mejora de calidad de vida y salud en el mundo por quedarse sólo en la superficie de este campo de investigación.

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AckerbauHalle's curator insight, May 12, 2013 12:50 PM

In Spanien gibt es einen Versuch mit Weizen, der auch für Menschen mit Zöliaki geeignet sein soll. 

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Current Issue : Nature

Current Issue : Nature | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it

Science remains institutionally sexist. Despite some progress, women scientists are still paid less, promoted less, win fewer grants and are more likely to leave research than similarly qualified men. In this special issue, Nature takes a hard look at this gender gap and at what is being done to close it. This issue is dedicated to the memory of Maxine Clarke. In the 28 years Maxine spent championing the highest scientific standards as an editor at Nature, she was all too often the only one to ask, "Where are the women?" Cover: Viktor Koen

sonia ramos's insight:

La portada de la revista Nature dedicada a las mujeres científicas, aunque remarca que la ciencia parece seguir siendo "institucionalmente" sexista.

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"Growing" medicines in plants requires new regulations - John Innes Centre (2013)

"Growing" medicines in plants requires new regulations - John Innes Centre (2013) | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it

Scientists say amending an EU directive on GMOs could help stimulate innovation in making cheaper vaccines, pharmaceuticals and organic plastics using plants. In a paper to be published in Current Pharmaceutical Design, six scientists from the US and Europe, including Dr Penny Sparrow from the John Innes Centre, compare risk assessment and regulation between the two continents... 

In the EU, plant-made pharmaceuticals have to be authorised in the same way as GM agricultural crops. In theory, agricultural crops can be grown by any farmer in the EU once approved. But for crops producing pharmaceuticals this would never actually happen. Drug companies would likely license farmers to grow these crops under controlled, defined and confined conditions... 

"Plant-made pharmaceuticals challenge two sets of existing EU regulations and to make progress in this area we need to make sure they are applied sensibly to allow pharmaceuticals to be produced in plants." Advantages of using plants to produce therapeutic proteins include the ability to produce large quantities quickly and cheaply, the absence of human pathogens, the stability of the proteins and the ease with which raw material can be stored as seed. This could be of huge benefit in developing countries where problems with storage can render vaccines useless... 

Just one farm growing 16,000 acres of safflower could meet the world's total demand for insulin. But potential cost savings are eliminated under current regulations, set up for GM agricultural crops not pharmaceuticals. The average cost for having GMOs approved in Europe is estimated at €7-10 million per event, compared to $1-2 million in the US. This helps keep Europe behind in exploiting the potential of these technologies...


Via Alexander J. Stein
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sonia ramos's comment, February 22, 2013 4:08 AM
Totally agree
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La superficie mundial de cultivos MG supera las 170 millones de hectáreas en 2012 | Transgénicos

La superficie mundial de cultivos MG supera las 170 millones de hectáreas en 2012 | Transgénicos | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it
Publicado por Alfredo L. Zamora en Destacado, Noticias el 20 Feb, 2013

Cuando se cumplen 17 años desde que se empezaran a sembrar semillas biotecnológicas en el mundo, estos cultivos han vuelto a registrar en 2012 un nuevo récord de adopción mundial.

Según se desprende del ‘Informe Anual sobre la situación mundial de la comercialización de cultivos modificados genéticamente en 2012’ elaborado por el International Service for the Acquisition of Agri-Biotech (ISAAA), la superficie mundial de cultivos modificados genéticamente (MG) alcanzó las 170,3 millones de hectáreas en 2012, lo que supone un incremento del 6% respecto al año anterior con 10,3 millones de hectáreas más sembradas.

 

OMGs EN LA UNIÓN EUROPEA

La Unión Europea (UE), pese a continuar en el vagón de cola, ha vuelto a registrar récord de siembra un año más con 129.071 hectáreas sembradas con semillas MG en 2012, 14.464 hectáreas más que en 2011 (España, Portugal, República Checa, Eslovaquia y Rumanía).

Alemania y Suecia dejaron de cultivar en 2012 la patata modificada genéticamente Amflora tras su salida del mercado europeo. Por su parte, Polonia dejó de cultivar maíz Bt movida por decisiones políticas sin base científica.

Los políticos europeos se enfrentan al reto de garantizar que los productores europeos no dependan de la importación de productos biotecnológicos y puedan apostar por ellos libremente y competir en igualdad. A día de hoy la Unión Europea acumula retrasos de hasta 44 años en aprobación de cultivos transgénicos. Todos ellos han sido declarados seguros por los órganos científicos competentes .

OMGs EN ESPAÑA

Según los datos del Ministerio de Agricultura, Alimentación y Medio Ambiente, España sigue estando un año más como la vanguardia europea con 116.306 hectáreas de cultivo de maíz modificado genéticamente, el 30% del total sembrado en el país. Estos datos suponen un incremento de casi el 20% respecto a 2011.

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Nuevo método mecánico para introducir ARN, proteínas y nanopartículas en células vivientes — Noticias de la Ciencia y la Tecnología (Amazings® / NCYT®)

Nuevo método mecánico para introducir ARN, proteínas y nanopartículas en células vivientes — Noticias de la Ciencia y la Tecnología (Amazings®  / NCYT®) | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it
Noticias científicas y tecnológicas, artículos y entrevistas sobre el mundo de la ciencia (Nuevo método mecánico para introducir ARN, proteínas y nanopartículas en células vivientes
sonia ramos's insight:

La biotecnología avanza rápidamente y de forma sorprendente. Las aplicaciones potenciales de este método son múltiples.

 

El vídeo describiendo este nuevo método: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=_ZeOU9ss-kM

 

Y la noticia oficial del MIT (responsables de tal descubrimiento): http://web.mit.edu/newsoffice/2013/putting-the-squeeze-on-cells-0123.html

 

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Recursos on line Ingeniería Genética.docx - Google Drive

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Documento creado y compartido: "Recursos on line Ingeniería Genética.docx" gracias a @juan_uhp @DoloresLunaH y @JohanWillemsen

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"La actitud de los verdes con los transgénicos es criminal" - elConfidencial.com

"La actitud de los verdes con los transgénicos es criminal" - elConfidencial.com | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it

Richard J. Roberts (Derby, Reino Unido, 1943) es un químico británico que actualmente reside en Estados Unidos, donde es director de investigación de New England Biolabs (Beverly, Massachusets). En 1993 Roberts fue galardonado, junto aPhillip Sharp, con el Premio Nobel de Fisiología o Medicina por sus descubrimientos sobre la estructura de los genes en 1977.

 

Estamos fallando en la educación de nuestros jóvenes y dejamos que nuestros políticos se comporten como si la ciencia no existiera.


También hay una fuerte tendencia por parte de los gobiernos a menospreciar el valor de la ciencia básica, que es de donde provienen los principales avances futuros y,cuando optan por invertir lo hacen centrándose en el potencial a corto plazo o en investigación muy aplicada a un fin específico.


Siempre les digo a los jóvenes que su misión consiste en rebelarse contra los dogmas y las viejas ideas y darse cuenta de que es posible que ellos mismos tengan las mejores ideas para el futuro. Después de todo, el mundo que están construyendo será su mundo.


Entrevista completa en: http://www.elconfidencial.com/alma-corazon-vida/2012/10/02/la-actitud-de-los-verdes-con-los-transgenicos-es-criminal-106505/


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Una entrevista totalmente recomendable

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3-D Molecular Designs - Molecular Education Products

3-D Molecular Designs - Molecular Education Products | "Biotech and Mol Bio" | Scoop.it
3D Molecular Designs (with the Center for Biomolecular Modeling) creates hand-held molecular models in a variety of types and formats to assist in science education.

Via Mary Williams
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Para Educadores con presupuesto...

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Mary Williams's curator insight, February 14, 2013 5:02 AM

This is a fun (but pricey) site! Check out the posters by David Goodsell. I used to have a poster of Inside a Human Cell on my wall and I loved it but lost it. Now I can get a new one! It is one of the few images that I think conveys the density and complexity of a cell.