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Natural History is Dying, and We Are All the Losers | The Artful Amoeba, Scientific American Blog Network

Natural History is Dying, and We Are All the Losers | The Artful Amoeba, Scientific American Blog Network | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
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So true!

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Insecticides put world food supplies at risk, say scientists

Insecticides put world food supplies at risk, say scientists | Bioscientias | Scoop.it

Regulations on pest sprays have failed to prevent poisoning of almost all habitats, international team of scientists concludes


Via Andrew van Zyl
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11 Of The Oldest Living Things In The World

11 Of The Oldest Living Things In The World | Bioscientias | Scoop.it

For nearly a decade, photographer Rachel Sussman has been traveling the globe in search of the world's oldest living things. From the Mojave Desert to the Australian Outback to Greenland's icy expanses, she captures portraits of life forms so relentless they've managed to survive eons of planetary change.


Via Andrew van Zyl
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The man packing a dozen peckers in his pants: Traveller arrested smuggling live hummingbirds in his trousers

The man packing a dozen peckers in his pants: Traveller arrested smuggling live hummingbirds in his trousers | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
This Dutch traveller was caught trying to smuggle more than a dozen live hummingbirds in special pouches sewn into the inside of his underwear at Rochambeau airport in Cayenne, French Guiana.
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Paperscape

Paperscape | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
Paperscape is an interactive map of all the scientific papers from the ArXiv database.
Peter Wolfs's insight:

Database wordt kaart! Als ze het nu ook nog deden voor biologie-artikellen!

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Fetal Cells Traffic to Injured Maternal Myocardium and Undergo Cardiac Differentiation

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The Mystery of Underwater Crop Circles, Explained - D-brief

The Mystery of Underwater Crop Circles, Explained - D-brief | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
They've been called the crop circles of the ocean floor - patterns created by male pufferfish in an attempt to woo a mate.
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Nieuwe bacterie gevonden in Nederlandse teken

Nieuwe bacterie gevonden in Nederlandse teken | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
Vier procent van de teken draagt een bacterie waarvan niet bekend was die in Nederlandse teken zit. Dat blijkt uit onderzoek van het Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu (RIVM).
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True Intelligence Goes Way Beyond Logic | 60 Second Reads | Big Think

True Intelligence Goes Way Beyond Logic | 60 Second Reads | Big Think | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
Intelligence actually involves things like being funny, being sexy or expressing a loving sentiment, maybe in a poem or in a musical piece. 
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Pyura chilensis: the closest thing to getting blood from a stone | Running Ponies, Scientific American Blog Network

Pyura chilensis: the closest thing to getting blood from a stone | Running Ponies, Scientific American Blog Network | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
“Period Rock? You’re calling me Period Rock now? Guys, seriously, I might look like a stone, but that doesn’t mean I have the heart of one. ...
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"Off with his head!" Red Queen (Alice in Wonderland)

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Fooled By Your Own Brain - Issue 2: Uncertainty - Nautilus

Fooled By Your Own Brain - Issue 2: Uncertainty - Nautilus | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
Your powers of attention: fooled!Attention is, by definition, limited. And that’s usually a good thing. If you’re searching for…
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What Can We Do About Cow-Caused Climate Change? | IdeaFeed | Big Think

What Can We Do About Cow-Caused Climate Change? | IdeaFeed | Big Think | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
Because it's not all our fault: Almost a quarter of US methane emissions come from livestock in the form of burps and farts. Now, a study is looking into ways to reduce that output via selective breeding.
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New drug reverses loss of brain connections in Alzheimer's disease

New drug reverses loss of brain connections in Alzheimer's disease | Bioscientias | Scoop.it

The first experimental drug to boost brain synapses lost in Alzheimer's disease has been developed by researchers at Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute. The drug, called NitroMemantine, combines two FDA-approved medicines to stop the destructive cascade of changes in the brain that destroys the connections between neurons, leading to memory loss and cognitive decline.

 

 

The decade-long study, led by Stuart A. Lipton, M.D., Ph.D., professor and director of the Del E. Webb Center for Neuroscience, Aging, and Stem Cell Research, who is also a practicing clinical neurologist, shows that NitroMemantine can restore synapses, representing the connections between nerve cells (neurons) that have been lost during the progression of Alzheimer's in the brain. The research findings are described in a paper published June 17 by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS).

 

The focus on a downstream target to treat Alzheimer's, rather than on amyloid beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles—approaches which have shown little success—"is very exciting because everyone is now looking for an earlier treatment of the disease," Lipton said. "These findings actually mean that you might be able to intercede not only early but also a bit later." And that means that an Alzheimer's patient may be able to have synaptic connections restored even with plaques and tangles already in his or her brain.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Vloasis's curator insight, June 19, 2013 7:01 PM

I wish something like this were available when my Dad was around.  They had prescribed him Aricept, which did not seem to slow down the disease.

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▶ Study says Earth on brink of mass extinction event

Published on Jun 18, 2014

A landmark study by an international group of scientists has concluded that planet Earth is on the brink of a mass extinction event comparable in scale to the one that wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. The researchers found that extinction rates are currently 1000 times higher than normal due to deforestation, global climate change, and the depletion of ocean fisheries.


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Knuckle sandwich: did fist fights drive evolution of human face?

Knuckle sandwich: did fist fights drive evolution of human face? | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Current theory about the shape of the human face just got a big punch in the mouth.Two University of Utah researchers proposed on Monday that the face of the ancestors of modern
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Scheidend hoogleraar Lyklema pleit voor zuiniger gebruik van grondstoffen

Scheidend hoogleraar Lyklema pleit voor zuiniger gebruik van grondstoffen | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
Scheidend hoogleraar Lyklema pleit voor zuiniger gebruik van grondstoffen
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Wetenschap 24 - Permafrost: niet zo permanent

Wetenschap 24 - Permafrost: niet zo permanent | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
Wat is permafrost eigenlijk precies, en wat is ermee aan de hand? Klimaatwetenschapper Jan Wuite, gespecialiseerd in ijzige gebieden, geeft kijkers van Klimaatjagers een spoedcursus.
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New process can trap carbon as stone for construction, paving, and more | ExtremeTech

New process can trap carbon as stone for construction, paving, and more | ExtremeTech | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
So you've designed the perfect carbon capture process, cheap and easily installed in everything from coal power plants to car exhaust systems. Everything works perfectly, and not a single hydrocarbon escapes its net.
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RDFRS: How Gender Reassignment Surgery Works

RDFRS: How Gender Reassignment Surgery Works | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
Our mission is to support scientific education and critical thinking to overcome religious fundamentalism, superstition, intolerance and suffering
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Remember the elephants

Remember the elephants | Bioscientias | Scoop.it

On World Elephant Day we are reminded that poaching is a growing concern across much of Africa. Though attempts at working together to end poaching are being made, DON PINNOCK argues that stockpile sales of old ivory do nothing to curb poaching and instead promote illicit trade.


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Hallo olinguito. Jou hadden we nog niet eerder ontdekt

Hallo olinguito. Jou hadden we nog niet eerder ontdekt | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
Het is een soort kruising tussen een kat en een teddybeer. En het is de eerste nieuwe soort in de zoogdierorde der Carnivora in 35 jaar die op het westelijk halfrond wordt ontdekt: de olinguito.
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The Ultimatum Game: What Primates Can Teach Us About Inequality | In Their Own Words | Big Think

The Ultimatum Game: What Primates Can Teach Us About Inequality | In Their Own Words | Big Think | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
The ultimatum game is the ultimate test of fairness, and chimpanzees passed the test by going for the fair options.  
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Neil deGrasse Tyson (caught on camera): The Universe is Trying to Kill You | Big Think Mentor | Big Think

Neil deGrasse Tyson (caught on camera): The Universe is Trying to Kill You | Big Think Mentor | Big Think | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
In this darkly hilarious outtake from his interview for Big Think Mentor, Neil deGrasse Tyson – astrophysicist and director of the Hayden Planetarium – warns that the universe is homicidal and we'd better watch our backs.
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Obama presenteert dinsdag een plan voor klimaatverandering

Obama presenteert dinsdag een plan voor klimaatverandering | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
Obama presenteert aanstaande dinsdag zijn plannen voor de aanpak van klimaatverandering, waarbij de focus ligt op het verminderen van de koolstofuitstoot.
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Fast-sinking jellyfish drag carbon to the seafloor

Fast-sinking jellyfish drag carbon to the seafloor | Bioscientias | Scoop.it
When jellyfish die they sink to the ocean floor faster than other marine organisms, allowing the oceans to absorb carbon dioxide, new research shows.

 

 

The study, published in Limnology and Oceanography, is the first ever to look at how quickly some gelatinous life in the oceans sinks.

 

This sinking biomass is an important part of the process by which carbon is exported from the ocean surface to the seafloor. Understanding how quickly dead organisms sink means scientists can make better estimates of how much carbon the oceans can absorb in the future.

 

Around 25 per cent of the carbon dioxide emitted from human activities dissolves into the oceans, where billions of tiny plankton start to transform some of it into organic carbon through photosynthesis.

 

As larger organisms, like jellyfish and pelagic tunicates – small transparent filter-feeders – eat these plankton, the carbon passes through the food chain until the animals die and sink to the sea floor.

 

As they sink the carbon is dragged down through the water column, away from the surface waters, where it is either ingested by scavengers, or stored in the deep water. This means more CO2 can be absorbed into the oceans at the surface.

 

Previous studies had shown that plankton and marine snow – the organic detritus that falls out of the water column – are the main sources of carbon transport to the seafloor. But this study showed jellyfish sink much faster and so may be able to transport even more carbon away from the surface.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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