Biopsychosocial Model
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Anxiety Disorders Symptoms - Specific Phobia - Anxiety Disorders

In this topic center you'll find information on the Anxiety Disorders, including phobia (social anxiety, agoraphobia, etc.), panic disorder, generalized anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, and obsessive compulsive disorder.
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The Biopsychosocial Model: Causes of Pathological Anxiety - Information on Anxiety and Other Anxiety Related Mental Health Disorders

The Biopsychosocial Model: Causes of Pathological Anxiety - Information on Anxiety and Other Anxiety Related Mental Health Disorders | Biopsychosocial Model | Scoop.it
So what causes anxiety and anxiety disorders anyway? According to Edmund Bourne (2000), author of the highly popular The Anxiety & Phobia Workbook, people often offer single cause explanations for anxiety disorders, including professionals.
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9.2.1  The biopsychosocial model - Non-Communicable Diseases, Emergency Care and Mental Health HEAT Module - LabSpace - The Open University

9.2.1  The biopsychosocial model - Non-Communicable Diseases, Emergency Care and Mental Health HEAT Module - LabSpace - The Open University | Biopsychosocial Model | Scoop.it
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What Is a Biopsychosocial Approach?

What Is a Biopsychosocial Approach? | Biopsychosocial Model | Scoop.it
The biopsychosocial approach is a way treating patients that takes a person's psychological and social condition into account. It...
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Introduction to Anxiety Disorders - Anxiety Disorders

Introduction to Anxiety Disorders - Anxiety Disorders | Biopsychosocial Model | Scoop.it
Introduction to our Anxiety Center
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Using the Biopsychosocial Approach to Resolve Student Dilemmas in Field Placements

Using the Biopsychosocial Approach to Resolve Student Dilemmas in Field Placements | Biopsychosocial Model | Scoop.it
Using the Biopsychosocial Approach to Resolve Student Dilemmas in Field Placements
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The Biopsychosocial Model 25 Years Later: Principles, Practice, and Scientific Inquiry

The Biopsychosocial Model 25 Years Later: Principles, Practice, and Scientific Inquiry | Biopsychosocial Model | Scoop.it
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Biopsychosocial model - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The biopsychosocial model (abbreviated "BPS") is a general model or approach positing that biological, psychological (which entails thoughts, emotions, and behaviors), and social factors, all play a significant role in human functioning in the context of disease or illness. Indeed, health is best understood in terms of a combination of biological, psychological, and social factors rather than purely in biological terms.[1] This is in contrast to the traditional, reductionist biomedical model of medicine that suggests every disease process can be explained in terms of an underlying deviation from normal function such as a pathogen, genetic or developmental abnormality, or injury.[2] The concept is used in fields such as medicine, nursing, health psychology and sociology, and particularly in more specialist fields such as psychiatry, health psychology, family therapy, chiropractic, clinical social work, and clinical psychology. The biopsychosocial paradigm is also a technical term for the popular concept of the "mind–body connection", which addresses more philosophical arguments between the biopsychosocial and biomedical models, rather than their empirical exploration and clinical application.[3]

The model was theorized by psychiatrist George L. Engel at the University of Rochester, and putatively discussed in a 1977 article in Science,[2] where he posited "the need for a new medical model." He discusses his model in detail in his paper in the American Journal of Psychiatry [Engel GL The clinical application of the biopsychosocial model, American Journal of Psychiatry 1980;137:535-544] where he discusses the fate of a hypothetical patient, a 55 year old Mr Glover who has a second heart attack six months after his first. Engel elegantly indicates that Mr Glover's personality helps to interpret his chest pain, that he is in some degree of denial and that it is only the intervention of his employer that gives him permission to seek help. Whereas reductionistically his heart attack can be understood as a clot in a coronary artery, the wider personal perspective helps to understand that different outcomes may be possible depending on how the person responds to his condition. Subsequently Mr Glover in the emergency room develops a cardiac arrest as a result of an incompetent arterial puncture. Once again systems theory can analyse this event in wider terms than just a cardiac arrhythmia. It sees the event as due to inadequate training and supervision of junior staff in an emergency room. Thus while there may be "no single definitive, irreducible model has been published." [4] Engel's elegant exposition of his model in this paper gives plenty of scope for this broader understanding of clinical practice.

The novelty, acceptance, and prevalence of the biopsychosocial model varies across cultures.[1]

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