Biomolecules
1 view | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by NC from Coffee Party Election Coverage
Scoop.it!

Cell receptor research wins Americans chemistry Nobel

Cell receptor research wins Americans chemistry Nobel | Biomolecules | Scoop.it

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Two American scientists won the 2012 Nobel Prize for chemistry on Wednesday for research into how cells respond to external stimuli that is helping to develop better drugs to fight diseases such as diabetes, cancer and depression.

 

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences said the 8 million crown ($1.2 million) prize went to Robert Lefkowitz, 69, and Brian Kobilka, 57, for discovering the inner workings of G-protein-coupled receptors, which allow cells to respond to chemical messages such as adrenaline rushes.

 

"Around half of all medications act through these receptors, among them beta blockers, antihistamines and various kinds of psychiatric medications," the committee said.

 

Working out better ways to target the receptors, known as GPCRs, is an area of keen focus for pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies.

 

Lefkowitz told a news conference by telephone he was asleep when the phone call came from Sweden. [MORE]


Via Michael Charney
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NC from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Harvard researchers discover hormon that spurs beta cell production. Monthly alternative to insulin?

Harvard researchers discover hormon that spurs beta cell production. Monthly alternative to insulin? | Biomolecules | Scoop.it

Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute have discovered a hormone that holds promise for a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes, a metabolic illness afflicting an estimated 26 million Americans. It could eventually mean that instead of taking insulin injections three times a day, you might take an injection of this hormone once a week or once a month, or in the best case maybe even once a year,” said Doug Melton (right). Melton and postdoctoral fellow Peng Yi discovered the hormone betatrophin, which has the potential to improve diabetes treatment.

 

Researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) have discovered a hormone that holds promise for a dramatically more effective treatment of type 2 diabetes, a metabolic illness afflicting an estimated 26 million Americans. The researchers believe that the hormone might also have a role in treating type 1, or juvenile, diabetes.

 

The hormone, called betatrophin, causes mice to produce insulin-secreting pancreatic beta cells at up to 30 times the normal rate. The new beta cells only produce insulin when called for by the body, offering the potential for the natural regulation of insulin and a great reduction in the complications associated with diabetes, the leading medical cause of amputations and non-genetic loss of vision.

 

The researchers who discovered betatrophin, HSCI co-director Doug Meltonand postdoctoral fellow Peng Yi, caution that much work remains to be done before it could be used as a treatment in humans. But the results of their work, which was supported in large part by a federal research grant, already have attracted the attention of drug manufacturers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
Biosciencia's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:10 AM

The work was published today by the journal Cell as an early online release.

CAEXI BEST's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:34 PM
Les chercheurs de Harvard viennent de  découvrir une hormone qui stimule la production de cellules bêta. Remplacement mensuel à l'insuline?
Center for Accessible Living NKY's curator insight, May 6, 2013 12:28 AM

More on the new possible treatment for juvenile diabetes.

Rescooped by NC from DNA and RNA Research
Scoop.it!

Researchers Calculate Cell Chemical Reaction Rates Using Gene Expression

Researchers Calculate Cell Chemical Reaction Rates Using Gene Expression | Biomolecules | Scoop.it

A pair of Rutgers–Camden researchers is taking an innovative approach to measuring how quickly cells react with chemicals. The new process could be a valuable resource in metabolic engineering and biochemical production.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
more...
No comment yet.