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Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
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The Driving Force of Biomimicry

The Driving Force of Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
It already has its own peer-reviewed journal, its own economic index and its own institute. As Earth Day dawns, it is clear the 15-year-old field of “biomimicry” is robust.
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'Bed-of-Needles' Super-Grip Plaster

'Bed-of-Needles' Super-Grip Plaster | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Scientists have designed a super-grip sticking plaster covered with microscopic needles to heal surgical wounds. The "bed-of-needles" patch, inspired by a parasitic worm that lives in the guts of fish and clings on using its cactus-like spikes, fixes skin grafts firmly in place without the need for staples. Its creators say the patch is three times stronger than the materials currently used for burns patients."

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Biomimetic Nanosponges Absorb Toxins Released by Bacterial Infections, Venom

Biomimetic Nanosponges Absorb Toxins Released by Bacterial Infections, Venom | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Engineers at the University of California, San Diego have invented a "nanosponge" capable of safely removing a broad class of dangerous toxins from the bloodstream.
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Material for Implants Mimics Squid Beaks

Material for Implants Mimics Squid Beaks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Many medical implants require hard materials that have to connect to or pass through soft body tissue, a mechanical mismatch that can lead to problems including a breakdown of the skin from abdominal feeding tubes or where wires pass through the chest to power heart pumps. Enter the squid.

The tip of a squid’s beak is harder than human teeth, but the base is as soft as the animal’s Jell-O-like body. In order to connect the two, a major part of the beak has a mechanical gradient that acts as a shock absorber so the animal can bite a fish with bone-crushing force, yet suffer no wear and tear on its fleshy mouth."

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Frog-like Robot Will Help Surgeons With Keyhole Surgery

Frog-like Robot Will Help Surgeons With Keyhole Surgery | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers at the University of Leeds are using the feet of tree frogs as a model for a tiny robot designed to crawl inside patients’ bodies during keyhole surgery."

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Dragons Colour Study Could Fuel Breakthroughs

Dragons Colour Study Could Fuel Breakthroughs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The CSIRO is hoping a new Australian study of native bearded dragons could lead to breakthroughs in medicine and the gathering solar energy.
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Scientists Design New Adaptive Material Inspired by Tears

Scientists Design New Adaptive Material Inspired by Tears | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Tunable material system designed by Harvard team is easily adaptable 
for diverse applications in fuel transport, textiles, optical systems, and more"

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By Building “Fairy Circles”, Termites Engineer Their Own Ecosystem

By Building “Fairy Circles”, Termites Engineer Their Own Ecosystem | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The Namib Desert is dotted with thousands of mysterious “fairy circles,” which are near-perfect circles of barren soil two to fifteen meters wide, rimmed by tall grass. They are unmistakable and stretch for miles, giving the landscape an ethereal and otherworldly feel. Many possible explanations have been proposed, including toxic substances in the soil, meteorites, termites, UFOs, and the ghosts of dead natives. But the circles are extremely remote—more than 110 miles from the nearest village—and have been difficult to study scientifically. Despite decades of research, the cause of these bizarre circles has remained elusive. But now, after a six-year study and more than 40 trips to the Namib Desert, Dr. Norbert Juergens believes he has come to understand the biological underpinnings of this strange phenomenon. According to Juergens, a single species of termites is responsible for creating and maintaining the circles. But the barren circles aren't just a byproduct of these tiny insects living below the sandy desert surface; they are part of a carefully cultivated landscape that helps the termites—and many other organisms—thrive in an otherwise inhospitable climate."

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A Self-Repairing Computer System Debuts After 15 Years Of Research

A Self-Repairing Computer System Debuts After 15 Years Of Research | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A computer scientist is using biomimicry to build a computer at University College London that selfcorrects operations the same way the body does in neural networks and DNA."

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Virginia Tech Creates Giant 170-Pound Jellyfish Robot!

Virginia Tech Creates Giant 170-Pound Jellyfish Robot! | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Engineers from Virginia Tech have created Cryo, a 170lb robotic jellyfish that could be used for Navy spy missions.
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Robotic Salamander Walks on Land, Swims in Water

Robotic Salamander Walks on Land, Swims in Water | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The amphibious robot mimics the crawling and swimming movements of the salamander so that it can easily transition between land and water.
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IBM Creates Liquid-based Transistors That Can Process Data Like The Human brain

IBM Creates Liquid-based Transistors That Can Process Data Like The Human brain | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A new way of creating on-off switches could lead to brain-like computing devices.
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Inspired by Leonardo Da Vinci 

Inspired by Leonardo Da Vinci  | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Fritjof Capra, physicist and author, explains that only now can we begin to appreciate the power of Leonardo da Vinci's science and its relevance today. 
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New Material Gets Itself Into Shape

New Material Gets Itself Into Shape | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Inspired by plant components that respond to external stimuli, material scientists have devised a new method for producing composite materials from a variety of materials that adopt a pre-programmed shape autonomously.
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First Algae Powered Building Goes Up In Hamburg

First Algae Powered Building Goes Up In Hamburg | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A 15-unit apartment building has been constructed in the German city of Hamburg that has 129 algae filled louvered tanks hanging over the exterior of the south-east and south-west sides of the building—making it the first in the world to be powered exclusively by algae. Designed by Arup, SSC Strategic Science Consultants and Splitterwerk Architects, and named the Bio Intelligent Quotient (BIQ) House, the building demonstrates the ability to use algae as a way to heat and cool large buildings."

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Design Tips from Mother Nature

Design Tips from Mother Nature | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Biomimicry, the practice of designing according to natural principles, has garnered devotees from many industries, producing a wide variety of innovative results
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Robotic Bat Wing Mimics a 'Spectacular Flyer'

Robotic Bat Wing Mimics a 'Spectacular Flyer' | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researcher Joseph Bahlman, a graduate student at Brown University, developed the robotic bat wing depicted in this video to help scientists better understand the workings of bat flight. "Bats are just really amazing, spectacular flyers," says Bahlman, a National Science Foundation graduate research fellow. "Their wings are extremely dynamic, so much more dynamic than birds or insects. If you look at the wings of a bat, they're just like our hands, they have all these joints that let their wings adapt into lots of different shapes, giving them a tremendous range of aerodynamic forces and maneuverabilities. They fly much better than anything we've engineered. I would love to figure out how that works and then duplicate it."

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How a Leafy Folk Remedy Stopped Bedbugs in Their Tracks

How a Leafy Folk Remedy Stopped Bedbugs in Their Tracks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A group of American scientists have been studying how to replicate properties found in certain types of bean leaves that can capture, or at least slow down, the pests.
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Honeybees Can Move Each Other With Electric Fields

Honeybees Can Move Each Other With Electric Fields | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"When bees fly through the air outside the hive, they collide with charged particles, from dust to small molecules. These impacts tear electrons away from their cuticle—their outer shell—and the bee ends up with a positive charge. When they return to the hive and walk or dance about, they give off electric fields. And Uwe Greggers from the Free University of Berlin has shown that they can detect these fields with the tips of their antennae. Despite our long history with the honeybee, there could still be a secret world of electric communication within the hive that we know nothing about."

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Swarming Robots Could be the Servants of the Future

Swarming Robots Could be the Servants of the Future | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers in the Sheffield Centre for Robotics, jointly established by the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University, have been working to program a group of 40 robots, and say the ability to control robot swarms could prove hugely beneficial in a range of contexts, from military to medical."

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Robot Ants Mimic Insect Behaviour

Robot Ants Mimic Insect Behaviour | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Tiny robotic ants created by scientists in the US are able to navigate through a network by following one another's trail, footage reveals.
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BionicOpter Dragonfly Drone Flutters About, Blows Minds

BionicOpter Dragonfly Drone Flutters About, Blows Minds | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"After crafting a machine last year that soared around like a herring gull, now the company [Festo] has created BionicOpter. The 17.3-inch long dragonfly drone can flutter through the air in any direction, and even hover, just like its biological inspiration. Its four carbon fiber and foil wings beat up to 20 times per-second, propelling it through the air as if it were swimming rather than flying."

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Portable Solar Power “Flower” Folds Up Like A Lotus

Portable Solar Power “Flower” Folds Up Like A Lotus | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Biomimicry run amok can be a beautiful thing, and that's the driving force behind a new portable solar power canopy called Lotus Mobile.
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How the Science of Swarms Can Help Us Fight Cancer and Predict the Future

How the Science of Swarms Can Help Us Fight Cancer and Predict the Future | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Thanks to new observation technologies, powerful software, and statistical methods, the mechanics of collectives are being revealed.
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Mainz Scientists Create New Flexible Mineral Inspired by Deep-sea Sponges

Mainz Scientists Create New Flexible Mineral Inspired by Deep-sea Sponges | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Scientists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Germany have created a new synthetic hybrid material with a mineral content of almost 90 percent, yet extremely flexible. They imitated the structural elements found in most sea sponges and recreated the sponge spicules using the natural mineral calcium carbonate and a protein of the sponge."

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