Biomimicry
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Biomimicry
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Dinner Plate Squid used to Develop Color-changing Camouflage

Dinner Plate Squid used to Develop Color-changing Camouflage | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Pencil squid have long proven useful to humans, mostly in the form of fried calamari on dinner plates, but a novel use for the creature has been discovered by researchers at University of California, Irvine, who have developed a camouflage coating from a protein in the everyday squid."

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Could Lemur Hibernation Answer Space Travel Questions?

Could Lemur Hibernation Answer Space Travel Questions? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A lemur that hibernates is strange and cute enough. But studying its lethargic state may provide a clue to sending humans on long-distance space travel or healing the ravages of heart attacks, stroke and head trauma, according to researchers at Duke University."

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The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Sunfish Teach Us About Submarines?

The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Sunfish Teach Us About Submarines? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The giant sunfish is a highly adapted jellyfish hunter and deep-water diver. What can we learn from his strange technique?
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How to Get Fresh Water Out of Thin Air

How to Get Fresh Water Out of Thin Air | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"In some of this planet’s driest regions, where rainfall is rare or even nonexistent, a few specialized plants and insects have devised ingenious strategies to provide themselves with the water necessary for life: They pull it right out of the air, from fog that drifts in from warm oceans nearby. Now researchers at MIT, working in collaboration with colleagues in Chile, are seeking to mimic that trick on a much larger scale, potentially supplying significant quantities of clean, potable water in places where there are few alternatives."

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From High-Rise to Low Impact: A Building That Mimics a Forest

From High-Rise to Low Impact: A Building That Mimics a Forest | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"It’s nearly 100 feet tall, fed by the sun and rain that fall on it, and is composed largely of wood. But it’s not a tree. It’s the world’s greenest office building.

The Bullitt Center, finished in the summer of 2013 and located on the edge of Seattle’s downtown, is designed to mimic the Douglas fir forests that once stood on the site."

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Chlorophyll Harnessed for Use in Nanophotonic Applications

Chlorophyll Harnessed for Use in Nanophotonic Applications | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Researchers from Aalto University and the University of Helsinki are developing nanostructures in which chlorophylls are bound to synthetic materials.
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A Camera That Sees Like the Human Eye

"The retina is an enormously powerful tool. It sorts through massive amounts of data while operating on only a fraction of the power that a conventional digital camera and computer would require to do the same task. Now, engineers at a company called iniLabs in Switzerland are applying lessons from biology in an effort to build a more efficient digital camera inspired by the human retina."

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The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Aye-Aye Teach Us About Echolocation?

The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Aye-Aye Teach Us About Echolocation? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A bizarre cross between Yoda, Dobby the House-Elf, and Gollum, the aye-aye finds food by echolocating with his fingers. Can humans find bioinspiration from this all-in-one Swiss Army Knife and SONAR expert?
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Norwegian Student Team Designs a Nature Inspired, Eco-Friendly Hand Dryer

Norwegian Student Team Designs a Nature Inspired, Eco-Friendly Hand Dryer | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Biomimicry, the study of nature and its systems as inspiration to solve human problems, has been applied to design in many forms—from buildings, to wind turbines, to bullet trains. Recently, one of the participating teams in the Biomimicry Institute’s Student Design Challenge looked to nature to inspire the design of a public hand dryer."

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The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Pompeii Worm Teach Us About Heat and Chemical Resistance?

The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Pompeii Worm Teach Us About Heat and Chemical Resistance? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"What can we learn for the Pompeii worm (Alvinella pompejana) and the near hell-like environment it inhabits?The Pompeii worm makes its home in a boiling hot, deadly sulfurous soup of heavy metals, at a pressure depth that would crush a man (think of the Hulk squeezing a tube of toothpaste). Only discovered thirty years ago, these four-inch wrigglers build large colonies along hydrothermal vent ‘smokers’ in the deepest part of the Pacific Ocean. How do they survive?"

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The Big Idea: Biomimetic Architecture

The Big Idea: Biomimetic Architecture | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"When the pope said Mass there this fall, the Sagrada Família was already 128 years in the making—and still not finished. Yet the church’s nature-inspired design remains ahead of its time."

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Meat-Eating Pitcher Plant Inspires Self-Cleaning 'Super Glass'

Meat-Eating Pitcher Plant Inspires Self-Cleaning 'Super Glass' | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"There’s nothing like a little biomimicry to get the creative juices flowing. Researchers at Harvard University recently discovered that the carnivorous pitcher plant may have a lot to teach us about making glass. In fact, they claim that by taking a few tips from this meat-eating plant, we could create super glass that can’t become dirty–an invention that would have significant benefits to the solar panel industry."

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Light Makes Materials Mimic Biological Response

Light Makes Materials Mimic Biological Response | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt), US, achieved a breakthrough in mimicking biological responses in non-living organisms. The study is the first to show that polymeric gels, such as hydrogels, can be moulded and reconfigured through the application of light, a process that, for example, could revolutionise microfluidic devices by making a single system adaptable to a variety of functions — potentially a huge cost savings."

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The Biomimicry Manual: What Can a Thorny Devil Teach Us About Water Harvesting?

The Biomimicry Manual: What Can a Thorny Devil Teach Us About Water Harvesting? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"One of Australia’s more bizarre creatures is the thorny devil or dragon, also known as the moloch. The devil is named for the ancient god Moloch, a hideous demon smeared with the blood of child sacrifice, but in reality, she is five inches long and lives entirely on ants. The thorny devil is, of course, covered in fearsome thorns, presumably to warn off would-be predators, but the spiky scales also serve another ingenious function. They form an incredibly efficient water harvesting system. What can the thorny devil teach us about water management in our own increasingly parched world?"

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How the Blue Whale can teach us about fans, filters and biomimicry

How the Blue Whale can teach us about fans, filters and biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Whales are some of the most extreme creatures on Earth  The 115 foot, 150 foot ton Blue Whale, for instance, is the largest animal that ever lived. These magnificent creatures are social mammals, descended from an ancient land dweller that also gave rise to the hippopotamus family. Like hippos and humans, they are warm-blooded and air-breathing, and stay with their young, nursing them for an extended period of time. And like us, they maintain complex social networks. As you might imagine, the whale faces some special challenges doing all this in the ocean. As usual, where challenge is extreme, the solutions are efficient. So how can the Blue Whale inspire us today?

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5 Smart Building Skins That Breathe, Farm Energy, and Gobble Up Toxins

5 Smart Building Skins That Breathe, Farm Energy, and Gobble Up Toxins | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Technically speaking, the smart facade-or building envelope that adapts to environmental conditions-dates back to the first window. But the contemporary idea of the smart facade has only been around for a few short decades, helped along by recent advances in chemical and material science. And over the past three years, we've seen the category boom. Below, check out some of the most interesting building facades to come across the screen in recent years: From a thermal metal screen that curls up when it's hot, to a titanium dioxide-covered wall that scrubs the air of pollutants."

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What Ant Colony Networks Can Tell Us About What’s Next for Digital Networks

What Ant Colony Networks Can Tell Us About What’s Next for Digital Networks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Ever notice how ant colonies so successfully explore and exploit resources in the world … to find food at 4th of July picnics, for example? You may find it annoying. But as an ecologist who studies ants and collective behavior, I think it’s intriguing — especially the fact that it’s all done without any central control. What’s especially remarkable: the close parallels between ant colonies’ networks and human-engineered ones. One example is “Anternet”, where we, a group of researchers at Stanford, found that the algorithm desert ants use to regulate foraging is like the Traffic Control Protocol (TCP) used to regulate data traffic on the internet. Both ant and human networks use positive feedback: either from acknowledgements that trigger the transmission of the next data packet, or from food-laden returning foragers that trigger the exit of another outgoing forager."

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Butterfly Inspires New Nanotechnology

Butterfly Inspires New Nanotechnology | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
By mimicking microscopic structures in the wings of a butterfly, an international research team has developed a device smaller than the width of a human hair that could make optical communication faster and more secure.
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The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Bombardier Beetle Teach Us About Fuel Injection?

The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Bombardier Beetle Teach Us About Fuel Injection? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The Bombardier beetle fires boiling poison at would-be predators. What can humans learn from them about fuel injection, drug delivery, and fire extinguishers from this walking weapon?
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Amazon Rainforest Workshops's curator insight, September 19, 2013 8:48 AM

Biomimicry:  Take your STEM learning activities to the wild side! 

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Opportunities in Biomimicry Await in Function, Not Just Form

Opportunities in Biomimicry Await in Function, Not Just Form | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Rather than simply aping nature's physical appearance, architects and designers are finding inspiration and potential revenue streams by studying nature's systems and materials.
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Monocultures, Biomimicry and Ethnography

Monocultures, Biomimicry and Ethnography | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Monocultures do not exist in nature because they are not sustainable.  Natural systems are resilient because of their diversity and redundancy, which allows them to maintain a healthy equilibrium. When there’s a change in the system (increase in population of deer), the system responds with a countermeasure (increase in number of predators), to ensure that equilibrium within the ecosystem is maintained.

 

 

Photo details: Marsh Reflections, Pyramid Mountain, Jasper National Park, Alberta, Copyright © 2009, Alan D. Wilson. http://www.naturespicsonline.com"

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The Nearly Effortless Flight of the Albatross

The Nearly Effortless Flight of the Albatross | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The wandering albatross spends weeks, even months, at sea without ever returning to land. With precise GPS data and custom navigation software, researchers have finally figured out how. Measuring and modeling the bird’s aerial behavior could inspire new drone designs."

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The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Crucifix Toad Teach Us About Adhesives?

The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Crucifix Toad Teach Us About Adhesives? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Deep in the Australian desert, the Crucifix Toad finds genius solutions that we can learn from. Glue, medical adhesives, water conservation, and more.
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How Squid and Octopus Might Point the Way to Nanotechnology-based Stealth Coatings

How Squid and Octopus Might Point the Way to Nanotechnology-based Stealth Coatings | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"For a long time, scientists have been fascinated by the dramatic changes in color used by marine creatures like squids and octopuses, but they never quite understood the mechanism responsible for this. Only recently they found out that a neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, sets in motion a cascade of events that culminate in the addition of phosphate groups to a family of unique proteins called reflectins. This process allows the proteins to condense, driving the animal's color-changing process. The latest findings revealed that there is a nanoscale mechanism behind cephalopods' ability to change color."

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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:40 AM

Watch this amazing video of a camouflaging octopus

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What Honeybees Can Teach Marketers

What Honeybees Can Teach Marketers | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Honeybees are social insects, always exchanging information with each other for the success of the hive. When a bee finds an attractive new flower with a good supply of pollen, it flies back to the hive and performs a sophisticated waggle dance for the other bees, communicating the distance and direction of the flower from the hive, the type of flower it is, and the potential magnitude of the find. Other bees watch this dance, then navigate to the flower themselves to harvest more of its pollen, which is good because producing a single pound of honey requires roughly two million bee-loads of pollen.

So now imagine for a moment that your company operates a flowerbed, and you are in the business of “selling” your pollen to bees. Your first task is to attract an exploring bee to land and take a look, and for that you need to be sure that your colors are bright and your scent is attractive. That’s advertising.

But the bee is part of a social network, so when it returns to the hive after visiting your flower it’s only going to send for the other bees if your pollen was good. And that’s customer experience."

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Linus Ridge's comment, August 14, 2013 5:00 PM
An excellent view point.
Linus Ridge's comment, August 14, 2013 5:03 PM
Shared on LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/in/linusillsleyridge