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Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
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Synthetic Enamel Through Biomimetics

Synthetic Enamel Through Biomimetics | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Dentists, put away your drills - synthetic tooth enamel can seal tiny cavities without the pain, and with less damage to the patient's teeth."

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Leaf-cutter Ants May Reveal Secrets to Creating Biofuels

Leaf-cutter Ants May Reveal Secrets to Creating Biofuels | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The ants use fungus gardens to break down leaves into food, a process that researchers say they could help them discover new enzymes and proteins useful for turning plant materials into energy.
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You Won't Want To Meet This 3D Printed Spiderbot Alone At Night

You Won't Want To Meet This 3D Printed Spiderbot Alone At Night | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The creepily-lifelike T8 spiderbot from Robugtix dramatically uses bio-inspiration for it's 3D printed form and mechanics. The robot is due for release in September.
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5 Natural Air-Conditioning Designs Inspired by Nature

5 Natural Air-Conditioning Designs Inspired by Nature | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"With heat waves gripping much of the planet, electricity grid operators are sweating even more than their customers. Air-conditioning uses a tremendous amount of energy, but a new group of designers think they can solve the problem by mimicking Mother Nature's craftiness."

 

 

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David Parr's comment, July 9, 2013 6:35 AM
Interesting thing about birds is their two-phase lungs. I did the first steps of analysis on adapting that kind of system to a building scale heat exchanger last year.
David Parr's curator insight, July 9, 2013 6:36 AM

Interesting ideas, though being inspired by tornadoes and hurricanes should be 'meteomimicry'. Also, I've always found bird's two phase lungs a more interesting model than their feet.

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New Market Research Report on Bioinspired and Nanoengineered Surfaces

Reportlinker.com announces that a new market research report is available in its catalogue: Bioinspired and Nanoengineered Surfaces: Technologies, Applications and Global Markets
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Cheetah-Cub Robot Created: See Other Nature-Inspired Machines

Cheetah-Cub Robot Created: See Other Nature-Inspired Machines | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A new cheetah-cub robot is just the latest in a mechanical menagerie of animal-inspired robots that climb, fly, swim, and slither.
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Genius of Biome Report: a Biomimicry Primer

Genius of Biome Report: a Biomimicry Primer | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A new report from the HOK designers and the Biomimicry 3.8 biologists lays out a map for using nature to problem solve. The report lays out a kind of textbook for how apply Biomimicry design principles. This process begins with a nuanced understanding of place by examining one's biome--a region defined by a community of plants and animals that have evolved to survive in a specific climate. The next steps involve identifying how nature problem-solves, and applying these concepts."

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How the University of California is Creating Real Life Superheroes

How the University of California is Creating Real Life Superheroes | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
From gecko-inspired climbing gear to robotic vehicles that can sprint over sand, University of California researchers are looking to the natural world for breakthrough ideas that can turn ordinary people into super humans.
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The Urban Greenprint: Biomimicry Applied to a City

The Urban Greenprint: Biomimicry Applied to a City | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Take a moment. Scrunch your eyes closed and imagine your ideal city. What do you want your city to look like in 50 years? Are you conjuring up images of tree-lined, pedestrian-friendly street-scapes enlivened with the sounds of kids, birds and restored streams? Are there more bikes than cars, is the air clean, and is food being grown nearby? In our experience, most people we ask imagine a healthy ecosystem as being part of an ideal, vibrant community. The question is--how do we get there?"

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Cheaper Way to Produce Chemicals

Cheaper Way to Produce Chemicals | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A new method for cheaply making fuels and essential chemicals has been developed and could one day be used to convert CO2 into a renewable fuel. Taking their inspiration from nature, scientists at the University of New South Wales have developed a new method for carrying out chemical reduction – an industrial process used to produce fuels and chemicals that are vital for modern society. Their catalyst-based approach has the big advantages that it uses cheap, replenishable reagents and it works well at room temperature and in air – so much so, it can even be carried out safely in a teacup. [...] The catalyst they designed mimics the activity of naturally occurring enzymes that catalyse reduction, such as alcohol dehydrogenase in yeast, that helps produce alcohol from sugar."

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Stopping Floods With Nature’s Help

Stopping Floods With Nature’s Help | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"[...] MacCowan, a PhD candidate at Leeds Metropolitan University in the United Kingdom, began applying biomimicry – looking to and emulating nature for solutions – to a flood-prone project near Leeds, England. By combining strategies of plants and animals from different parts of the globe as a system, this “eco-industrial park” will benefit from the genius of the Elephant Foot plant, European Water Vole and Giraffe to capture, store and distribute excess volumes of stormwater."

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Mitidaption's curator insight, November 18, 2014 5:33 AM

Green infrastructure is less environmental/economic costly vs grey infrastructure

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Butterflies Inspire Anti-Counterfeit Technology

Butterflies Inspire Anti-Counterfeit Technology | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
"A Canadian company is fighting counterfeiters by employing one of the most sophisticated structures in nature: a butterfly wing. To be precise, Nanotech Security Corp. in Vancouver is using the natural structure of the wings of a Morpho butterfly, a South American insect famous for its bright, iridescent blue or green wings, to create a visual image that would be practically impossible to counterfeit. The technology was developed at British Columbia’s Simon Fraser University, and licensed to the company."
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Defeat Hackers with Biomimicry

Defeat Hackers with Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"From denial of service attacks to server crashes to day-long disruptions of Google Drive, almost all organizations are familiar with threats to their information security. Given that digital information is more central than ever, it's worrisome that the history of data security is littered with failure. Organizations seeking to be better prepared for and more resilient in response to information threats may want to draw on a far larger and older source of lessons on information security — the 3.5 billion year history of life. Tapping into biology's security database — which was developed by millions of species in response to extremely complex natural security problems — gives us first a wakeup call, then some practical guidance on how to keep our information secure."

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Look out! Here Comes the Spider Web! Behind the Quest to Recreate This Powerful Silk.

Look out! Here Comes the Spider Web! Behind the Quest to Recreate This Powerful Silk. | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A Japanese startup called Spiber said it has produced an artificial spider thread that it claims is equal to steel in tensile strength yet as flexible as rubber."

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Social Innovation or Natural Coevolution?

Social Innovation or Natural Coevolution? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Social innovation implies a paradigm change

Innovation is essential for society, because it is the principal mechanism by which societies create and sustain competitive advantage. According to various sources, social innovation implies a paradigm change, or, in other words, it challenges an assembly of beliefs – possessed by an individual, a group or a civilization – that defend as certain and makes them set against the acceptance of other

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Octopuses Inspire 3D-printed Propulsion Systems for Boats

Octopuses Inspire 3D-printed Propulsion Systems for Boats | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Octopuses and squid are amazing animals. Their unique attributes have already inspired invisibility cloak technology and more comfortable medical implants. Now, their ability to flee quickly from predators has inspired a new propulsion system for boats and other water craft."

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Printing Artificial Bone

Printing Artificial Bone | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers working to design new materials that are durable, lightweight and environmentally sustainable are increasingly looking to natural composites, such as bone, for inspiration: Bone is strong and tough because its two constituent materials, soft collagen protein and stiff hydroxyapatite mineral, are arranged in complex hierarchical patterns that change at every scale of the composite, from the micro up to the macro."

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Welcoming Nature as a Design Partner

Welcoming Nature as a Design Partner | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The philosopher Eric Hoffer once said, “Creativity is the ability to introduce order into the randomness of nature.” This outlook parallels historic attitudes toward the relationship of the made versus the born. The contrasting view—that nature is the source of creativity—is now gaining strength. Biomimicry, which advocates nature as a design mentor rather than a source for raw materials, has influenced many fields and taken form in strategies ranging from metaphorical to manipulative."

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Computation, 3D Printing, and Testing of Bone-Inspired Composites

Computation, 3D Printing, and Testing of Bone-Inspired Composites | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers at MIT have developed an approach that allows them to create physical sample of a multiscale computer model of a synthetic material. he approach allows creation of complex hierarchical patterns such as bones. The process could be scaled up to provide a cost-effective way to manufacture composite materials that are tailored for specific functions in different parts of a structure."

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Harvard is Building Robotic Cockroaches

Harvard is Building Robotic Cockroaches | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The art and science of biomimicry teaches us to find solutions to our problems by looking at what nature has come up with to solve similar problems. This is what the microrobotics team at Harvard has apparently done with these small cockroach-like autonomous robots. Like insects, their legs move so fast that we must slow down a video of their movements to understand how they do it."

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Spider Webs Offer Biomimetic Inspiration for Dew Catchers in Developing Countries

Spider Webs Offer Biomimetic Inspiration for Dew Catchers in Developing Countries | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
With the help of a scanning electron microscope, Chinese scientists have figured out the secret architecture to spiders' webs that make them incredibly effective at catching dew.
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Biomimetics: It Looks Like a Bird, it Acts Like a Bird, But it’s Not a Bird

Biomimetics: It Looks Like a Bird, it Acts Like a Bird, But it’s Not a Bird | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The industry of robotics is an ever changing, constantly progressing field in which engineers and programmers manage to combine their efforts into some tangible form of technology. Every new advancement seems almost unreal when the time is taken to consider all the pieces that must work in perfect unison to complete even the most basic of tasks. Perhaps the pinnacle, the robotic field, is the emerging specialty of biomimetics. Biomimetcs, as the name suggests, focuses on recreating the traits and abilities of biological systems in the form of materials and machines. The machines that fall into this category range from winged flight machines to tactilely sensing robots to robotic pack-mules."

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Barlay Industries, Andrew Barlay's curator insight, June 18, 2013 11:29 AM

Robotics will see an emerging technological change with the real addition of AI. The better program is able to adapt and begin to show actuall signs of cognetive reaction rather than a programed one. The emergence of a Bio-Digital Consciousness is not as far off as one might think.

 

Art, Music and general creativity are what the next generation of AI implements and Robotics are truely focused towards. I am all for having creations create, but we had better keep a living close eye on what we allow our creations to aspire to be...

 

Andrew Barlay

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From Spiders, a Material to Rival Kevlar

From Spiders, a Material to Rival Kevlar | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A Japanese startup claims it has cracked the knotty problem of commercializing the production of spider thread, which, gram for gram, is stronger than nylon and even many metals. As one of nature's super-substances -- tougher than Kevlar yet significantly more elastic -- scientists have been trying to recreate it in significant quantities in labs but failed for over a decade. By using synthetic biology techniques and a new spinning technology, Spiber Inc. says it is now able to produce many hundreds of grams of synthetic spider silk protein where past efforts have produced less than a few grams over a day. One gram of the special protein produces about 9,000 meters (29,527 feet) of silk."

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Harnessing The Power Of Peacocks To Make Colorful Images

Harnessing The Power Of Peacocks To Make Colorful Images | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The gloriously colored, iridescent feathers of the male peacock aren't what they seem on the surface. They look that way largely because the feathers contain nanometer-scale protein structures that break up incoming light waves, recombine and reflect them as rich, vibrant colors. Scientists at the University of Michigan think they have a technology that emulates this process to display pictures without chemicals or electrical power. Eventually, the technology could replace the displays now used on smartphones, tablets, and computer screens, with strikingly high definition."

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Borrowing From Nature

"Architets have long taken inspiration from nature. In ancient Egypt columns were modelled on palm trees and lotus plants, and building designers have borrowed the shapes and proportions of natural forms ever since as they strived to achieve aesthetic perfection. Some architects now believe that such biomimicry has more to offer than simply making buildings look good. They are copying functional systems found in nature to provide cooling, generate energy and even to desalinate water. And they insist that doing these things using biomimetic designs is not just a gimmick, but makes financial sense."

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