Biomimicry
46.1K views | +35 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
onto Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

One Day We'll Fix Everything With Glues Copied From Mussels, Oysters, And Barnacles

One Day We'll Fix Everything With Glues Copied From Mussels, Oysters, And Barnacles | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A researcher has figured out a way to take the power of natural glues and make non-toxic and incredibly strong synthetic adhesives. It could help do everything from securing broken bones to manufacturing cars."

more...
No comment yet.
Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Fibrous Structures

Fibrous Structures | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
“An elytron is very delicate and super lightweight, because after all, the beetle still needs to fly,” says Achim Menges, an architect and professor at the University of Stuttgart. “At the same time it’s very robust and exceptionally high performance.”

It was these elytra, the fibrous structures in the forewing shells of flying beetles, that inspired the Elytra Filament Pavilion.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

WhalePower’s Tubercle Technology Licensed to TEG

WhalePower’s Tubercle Technology Licensed to TEG | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The Canadian company WhalePower has granted an exclusive, worldwide, manufacturing license to TEG, a German company specialized in efficient, green forms of energy generation, to use WhalePower’s Tubercle Technology to create retrofit blade kits for wind turbines. Tubercle Technology is inspired by the flippers of Humpback Whales and can be used to improve the efficiency of turbines, compressors, pumps and fans.

 
more...
Jenny84's curator insight, May 13, 2:18 PM
Check this! It's quite interesting. What do you think?
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Bee Model Could Be Breakthrough for Autonomous Drone Development

Bee Model Could Be Breakthrough for Autonomous Drone Development | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Bees control their flight using the speed of motion (optic flow) of the visual world around them. A study by Scientists at the University of Sheffield Department of Computer Science suggests how motion-direction detecting circuits could be wired together to also detect motion-speed, which is crucial for controlling bees’ flight.

“Honeybees are excellent navigators and explorers, using vision extensively in these tasks, despite having a brain of only one million neurons,” said Alex Cope, PhD., lead researcher on the paper. “Understanding how bees avoid walls, and what information they can use to navigate, moves us closer to the development of efficient algorithms for navigation and routing, which would greatly enhance the performance of autonomous flying robotics,” he added.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Insect Eyes Enable Drones to Fly Independently

Insect Eyes Enable Drones to Fly Independently | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"After studying how insects navigate through dense vegetation, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have come up with a system that can be applied to flying robots. By adapting the system to drones, they can be made to adjust their speed to their surroundings and fly on their own- completely without human intervention and control. The breakthrough was made by vision researchers Emily Baird and Marie Dacke at the Department of Biology in Lund. Among other things, their research shows how bees that fly through dense forests assess light intensity to avoid other objects and find holes in the vegetation to enable them to navigate safely."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Silvery Hairs Turn Ants into Walking Mirrors

Silvery Hairs Turn Ants into Walking Mirrors | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

One ant species in the Sahara Desert is covered by a silvery sheen of body hair that acts as a wearable sun shield for the creatures, a new study finds. The silvery hairs completely reflect the light like mirrors, preventing the ants from absorbing too much heat. That may help to explain how the Saharan silver ants can stay cool when temperatures in the arid region reach a blistering 122 degrees Fahrenheit (50 degrees Celsisus).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Learning from the Information Network of Life

Learning from the Information Network of Life | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Life is network based. Millions of years of evolution have allowed the natural world to develop what can be argued to be the most tried, tested and optimized protocols in existence: biological networks. The ability for Internet of Things (IoT) market stakeholders to interpret and effectively apply principles derived from the study of biological networks will lead to increased asset and resource productivity, as well as greater system resilience.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

A Seahorse Tail Could Inspire Better Robots, Surgical Tools

A Seahorse Tail Could Inspire Better Robots, Surgical Tools | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
An advance in understanding why the seahorse’s tail is made of square plates could inform the next generation of robotics and armor. In an engineering study that looked at the mechanics of how the fish’s tail works, researchers found the structure’s shape is optimized to resist crushing and to grasp while bending and twisting.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Why Nature Prefers Hexagons

Why Nature Prefers Hexagons | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"How do bees do it? The honeycombs in which they store their amber nectar are marvels of precision engineering, an array of prism-shaped cells with a perfectly hexagonal cross-section. The wax walls are made with a very precise thickness, the cells are gently tilted from the horizontal to prevent the viscous honey from running out, and the entire comb is aligned with the Earth’s magnetic field. Yet this structure is made without any blueprint or foresight, by many bees working simultaneously and somehow coordinating their efforts to avoid mismatched cells."

more...
Marcelo Errera's curator insight, April 22, 11:39 PM
The evolution of design, configuration, structure, organization is a natural phenomenon. Evidence massively supports it. There's no designer, there's only the Constructal Law.

I challenge anyone to count the percentage of "mathematical hexagons" in a honeycomb. 
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Bacteria Have ‘Biological Wheels’ That We Can Finally See In 3D

Bacteria Have ‘Biological Wheels’ That We Can Finally See In 3D | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Among bacteria’s many attributes, perhaps one of its most overlooked yet important ones is its ability to propel itself via flagellum, a unique appendage hanging off its end. This mechanism is a perfect example of a naturally occurring, biological wheel. Aside from the beautiful novelty of these images, researchers could study them to develop better motors for nano-robots, or to design better antibiotics that target the flagellum specific to a certain bacteria.[...] Now, for the first time, scientists were able to take a high resolution, 3D look at these wheels at work, using an electron microscope."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Why Don't Penguin Feathers Freeze?

Why Don't Penguin Feathers Freeze? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Despite living in frigid temperatures and getting wet, penguins’ feathers remain free of ice. How is that possible? [...] The answer is in the microstructure of penguins' feathers. The feathers are comprised of “a network of barbs, wrinkled barbules and tiny interlocking hooks. In addition to being hydrophobic, this hierarchical architecture with grooved structures is anti-adhesive. [...] Based on their discoveries about the feathers’ microstructure, the scientists recreated the design in a nanofiber membrane that could be developed into an ice-proof material, which they say could potentially be used in applications such as electrical insulation."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

How Nature Makes Things: Relevant Bio-Inspired Approaches

How Nature Makes Things: Relevant Bio-Inspired Approaches | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Additive manufacturing shows great promise for making things in a way that more closely resembles natural form, but some of the below strategies are worth investigating to reduce or eliminate toxicity and to make more functional products.".

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Bees Could Engineer Next-Generation Energy Storage

Bees Could Engineer Next-Generation Energy Storage | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Energy storage could be the next item on the list when it comes to listing all the reasons we need to save the world's bee population from collapse. A research team at Purdue University has found that bee pollen can be used as an efficient, renewable source for anodes in lithium-ion batteries. The team also tested pollen sourced directly from cattails and got even more encouraging results."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Nature Inspired Self-cleaning Windows Developed

Nature Inspired Self-cleaning Windows Developed | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"UCL researchers have developed a revolutionary new type of ‘smart’ window which could cut window-cleaning costs in tall buildings while reducing heating bills and boosting worker productivity. The windows use nature inspired nanostructures which mimic the eyes of moths to cut glare, save energy and clean themselves."

more...
Bge Innovation's curator insight, January 25, 3:18 PM

un nouveau verre associant nano structures en cônes et dioxyde de vanadium, pour éviter salissures, éblouissement et échanges thermiques

Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

The Biology of Corporate Survival

The Biology of Corporate Survival | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
"Some business thinkers have argued that companies are like biological species and have tried to extract business lessons from biology, with uneven success. We stress that companies are identical to biological species in an important respect: Both are what’s known as complex adaptive systems. Therefore, the principles that confer robustness in these systems, whether natural or manmade, are directly applicable to business."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Fish-eyed Lens Cuts Through the Dark

Fish-eyed Lens Cuts Through the Dark | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Combining the best features of a lobster and an African fish, engineers have created an artificial eye that can see in the dark. And their fishy false eyes could help search-and-rescue robots or surgical scopes make dim surroundings seem bright as day.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Bat Biosonar Biomimicry for Improved Sonar Technology

Comparable to some other animals on our planet, bats use other methods instead sight in order to navigate or hunt. They are able to “see” in the dark by sending out sound waves that bounce back to the bats’ ears from objects such as fruit on trees and flying insect prey. The echolocation or biosonar is currently a simpler way for robots to perceive shapes than pattern recognition programs and is much more applicable in areas without the needed light.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Chameleon's Tongue Gives Up Secrets

Chameleon's Tongue Gives Up Secrets | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Scientists have built a mathematical model to explain the secrets of the chameleon's extraordinary tongue. It took more than 20 equations to capture mathematically how the reptile's tongue unravels at very high speed to snare insects. The model explains the mechanics of the animal's tongue and the inherent energy build-up and rapid release. British researchers say the insights will be useful in biomimetics - copying from nature in engineering and design."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Ski Design Inspired by Turtle Scales

Ski Design Inspired by Turtle Scales | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Looking for skis to maximize the fun as you hurtle down the slopes? The ideal ski can withstand high levels of pressure in turns yet also be easy to maneuver. These two features usually require two different types of skis: the rigid skis preferred by expert skiers or the flexible ones that intermediate skiers opt for. But a new type of ski offers a two-in-one solution thanks to a design based on turtle scales.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Butterfly Flaps Its Wings, Could Spark Solar Energy Progress

Butterfly Flaps Its Wings, Could Spark Solar Energy Progress | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
From the wonderful world of biomimicry comes a solar energy breakthrough based on the posture at rest of a small butterfly called the Cabbage White. Who knew that voguing is still a thing? Apparently, this stylin’ butterfly forms a uniquely angled “V” with its wings, which according to new research from the UK’s University of Exeter indicates a new pathway for developing lighter, more efficient solar energy harvesting systems.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Octopus-Inspired Robots Can Grasp, Crawl, and Swim

Octopus-Inspired Robots Can Grasp, Crawl, and Swim | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Most of today’s robots only function well in highly structured environments, like factory assembly lines. But thanks to some clever biomimicry, we might soon be seeing robots with a more flexible approach. To build their squishy aquatic robots, a team of researchers in Italy drew inspiration from the octopus. The animal’s movements don’t require a lot of brainpower. Rather than relying on top-down instructions from the central nervous system, many of an octopus’s movements happen almost spontaneously–the result of the physical interplay between the animal’s body and its surrounding environment. By utilizing this strategy, called embodied intelligence, the team created soft robots that could grasp objects, crawl along the seafloor, and even swim–with a lot less computing power than you might imagine.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Researchers Develop Clog-Resistant Filtration System Inspired by 3D Printed Fish Mouths

Researchers Develop Clog-Resistant Filtration System Inspired by 3D Printed Fish Mouths | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Filters can be found all around us, from our cars to our coffee makers. But they have one universal quality: they get clogged eventually. But a 3D printed solution could be just around the corner, as the Professor of Biology and ichthyologist Laurie Sanderson from the College of William and Mary has a patent pending for a bio-inspired alternative. Learning from the mouth structure of filter-feeding fish (using 3D printed models), she has developed a new mechanism that prevents filter clogging by trapping particles in vortices in the fluids.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

'Gecko Grippers' Head to Space Station

'Gecko Grippers' Head to Space Station | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket loaded with supplies and science experiments blasted off from Florida on Tuesday, boosting an Orbital ATK cargo capsule toward the International Space Station.[...] Perched on top of the rocket was a Cygnus capsule loaded with nearly 7,500 pounds (3,400 kg) of food, science experiments and equipment including a 3-D printer to build tools for astronauts and non-stick grippers modeled after gecko feet.[...] The experimental Gecko Gripper is a new kind of adhesive that mimics the way gecko lizards cling to surfaces without falling. It aims to test a method of attaching things in the weightless environment of space. NASA is looking at robotic versions of gecko feet to attach sensors and other instruments onto and inside satellites.

Photo details: Leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), George Chernilevsky,2009. Wikimedia Commons, public domain.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Beetle Bumps Inspire Bigger and Faster Water Droplets 

Beetle Bumps Inspire Bigger and Faster Water Droplets  | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers were able to make drops grow six times faster than normal by copying the insects' shell geometry. Combined with other plant techniques, the team created drops that grew larger as temperatures increased.Scientists have drawn inspiration from the bumpy shells of Namib desert beetles to improve the collection and transport of water droplets."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Natural Healing with Biomimicry

Natural Healing with Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"If there’s truth to the adage that we’re all products of our environment, then it makes good sense to ensure the spaces we work in are as conducive to bringing out the best in us as possible. There’s a lot of buzz in design circles these days around the idea of biophilia—the notion that humans possess an instinctive tendency to seek out connections with nature and other forms of life." 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Carnegie Mellon Joins IARPA Project to Reverse-engineer Brain Algorithms

Carnegie Mellon Joins IARPA Project to Reverse-engineer Brain Algorithms | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Carnegie Mellon University is embarking on a five-year, $12 million research effort to reverse-engineer the brain, seeking to unlock the secrets of neural circuitry and the brain's learning methods. Researchers will use these insights to make computers think more like humans."

more...
No comment yet.