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The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Sunfish Teach Us About Submarines?

The Biomimicry Manual: What can the Sunfish Teach Us About Submarines? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The giant sunfish is a highly adapted jellyfish hunter and deep-water diver. What can we learn from his strange technique?
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The Stickiness of Frog Tongues

The Stickiness of Frog Tongues | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The frog looks nearly asleep, when suddenly its tongue darts out, snaring an unsuspecting insect. What makes its tongue so sticky? Find out...
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The Great Salmon Run Algorithm

The Great Salmon Run Algorithm | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Mechanical engineers at the Babol University of Technology in Mazandaran, Iran, have turned to nature to devise an algorithm based on the survival trials faced by salmon swimming upstream to the spawning grounds to help them fish out the optimal solution to a given problem.
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Why Spider Fangs Are Nature's Perfect Needles

Why Spider Fangs Are Nature's Perfect Needles | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A spider's fangs are natural injection needles, making them perfectly suited for piercing the skeletons of prey and delivering a kiss of venom, a new study finds. "For biomedical applications, for example, the spider fang may lead to the design of new infusion techniques, new blood-bypassing instruments and many other life-saving technologies," said Benny Bar-On, a biomaterials scientist at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces in Germany and co-author of the study published today (May 27) in the journal Nature Communications.
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Using Nature as a Model for Low-friction Bearings

Using Nature as a Model for Low-friction Bearings | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The mechanical properties of natural joints are considered unrivalled. Cartilage is coated with a special polymer layer allowing joints to move virtually friction-free, even under high pressure. Scientists have developed a new process that technologically imitates biological lubrication and even improves it using two different types of polymers.

Via Janine Benyus
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Nanotube Forests Drink Water From Arid Air

Nanotube Forests Drink Water From Arid Air | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers in the lab of Rice materials scientist Pulickel Ajayan found a way to mimic the Stenocara beetle, which survives in the desert by stretching its wings to capture and drink water molecules from the early morning fog. They modified carbon nanotube forests grown through a process created at Rice, giving the nanotubes a superhydrophobic (water-repelling) bottom and a hydrophilic (water loving) top. The forest attracts water molecules from the air and, because the sides are naturally hydrophobic, traps them inside."

 

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Fireflies Inspire Brighter LEDs

Fireflies Inspire Brighter LEDs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
By mimicking the design of a firefly's light-emitting organ, researchers built an LED that shines 55 percent brighter.
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Biomimicry in Lighting Design

Biomimicry in Lighting Design | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Check out these [nature-inspired] developments in solar energy and LED lighting. So many possibilities yet to be discovered."

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Nature Inspires Flying Robot Design

Nature Inspires Flying Robot Design | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Nature is inspiring the design of the next generation of drones, or flying robots, that could eventually be used for everything from military surveillance to search and rescue."

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Biomimicry Breakthrough: Butterfly Wings Could Lead to Better Solar Panels

Biomimicry Breakthrough: Butterfly Wings Could Lead to Better Solar Panels | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"We studied a novel photoanode structure inspired by butterfly wing scales with potential application on dye-sensitized solar cell in this paper. Quasi-honeycomb like structure (QHS), shallow concavities structure (SCS), and cross-ribbing structure (CRS) were synthesized onto a fluorine-doped tin-oxide-coated glass substrate using butterfly wings as biotemplates separately." 

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Biomimicry Inspires Squid-like Building - Green Building Elements

Biomimicry Inspires Squid-like Building - Green Building Elements | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The Biotic-Tech Skyscraper City uses biomimicry and is inspired by squid, using transparency, flexibility, movement and protective pigmentation.
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Plant-mimicking Robots Could Help Explore Our World

Plant-mimicking Robots Could Help Explore Our World | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"In the world of biomimicry, plants haven't necessarily been overlooked, but compared to animals -- especially in robotics -- there have been far fewer projects inspired by them. That's why it's neat to read about a project that revolves completely around finding ways to build robots that mimic plants, in particular their roots."

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Synthetic Shark Skin Swimsuits Make Swimming Faster

Synthetic Shark Skin Swimsuits Make Swimming Faster | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Harvard scientists say that they've managed to replicate one of the most fascinating organs of the animal kingdom in a lab. Their finely-detailed synthetic shark skin could make some of the fastest underwater robots around, and maybe even one day grace human wetsuits or the hulls of ships."

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Scientist Develops Cartwheeling Moroccan Spider-inspired Robot for Mars Mission

Scientist Develops Cartwheeling Moroccan Spider-inspired Robot for Mars Mission | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Robot intended for rough terrain, like that on Mars, takes inspiration from a cartwheeling desert-dwelling spider. Dubbed Tabbot, the robot can walk or roll over the surface.
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University of Stuttgart Unveils Woven Pavilion Based on Beetle Shells

University of Stuttgart Unveils Woven Pavilion Based on Beetle Shells | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A robotically woven carbon-fibre pavilion based on the lightweight shell encasing a beetle's wings and abdomen is revealed by the University of Stuttgart.
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How the Disco Clam Got its Flash

How the Disco Clam Got its Flash | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"As molluscs go, Ctenoides ales is quite literally one of the flashiest. A native of the Indo-Pacific region, the creature is known as the disco clam because the soft tissues of its ‘lips’ flash like a mirror ball above a dance floor. A study published today finds that the disco clam achieves this using nanoparticles of silica to reflect light.".

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Taking Inspiration From Nature’s Brightest Colours

Taking Inspiration From Nature’s Brightest Colours | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Brightly-coloured, iridescent films, made from the same wood pulp that is used to make paper, could potentially substitute traditional toxic pigments in the textile and security industries. The films use the same principle as can be seen in some of the most vivid colours in nature, resulting in colours which do not fade, even after a century. Some of the brightest and most colourful materials in nature – such as peacock feathers, butterfly wings and opals – get their colour not from pigments, but from their internal structure alone.
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A Nature-Inspired Scooter Reinvents The Cargo Bike So That It's Easier To Pedal

A Nature-Inspired Scooter Reinvents The Cargo Bike So That It's Easier To Pedal | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Mocan looks like a scooter, but has plenty of room to carry big items. [...]  Designed as part of the Biomimicry Student Design Challenge, which asks students to look for inspiration in nature, the Mocan imitates the squiggle movement of centipedes and snakes. Instead of pedaling, you move a handle back and forth to move quickly down the street."

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Flectofin®, a Hingeless Louver Inspired by the Bird of Paradise Flower

"Inspired by the valvular pollination mechanism of the Strelitzia Reginae flower (commonly known as the Bird-Of-Paradise) the Flectofin® is a hingeless louver system  that is capable of shifting its fin 90 degrees by inducing bending stresses in the spine caused by displacement of a support or change of temperature in the lamina."

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'Robot Sperm' Controlled by Magnets

'Robot Sperm' Controlled by Magnets | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Engineers have built a sperm-like robot that they can control with magnets. The simple design has a metal-coated head and a flexible body about six times longer than a human sperm. Using a magnetic field no stronger than a fridge magnet, the team made the robot "swim" forward and steered it towards a fixed point."

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Insect Gears Could Change the Way You Look at Eengineering

Insect Gears Could Change the Way You Look at Eengineering | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Issus coleoptratus is an unlikely hero, but one whose jumping prowess could revolutionize ballistics and spring-loaded machines. [...] In Science, Malcolm Burrows and Gregory Sutton (of the University of Cambridge and University of Bristol, respectively) describe a mechanism on the hind legs of a jumping insect that can only be described as a gear, cogs and all.

Although the structure had been seen before, their investigation of its action, using high speed cameras, has revealed its function: the first known case of an intermeshing gear mechanism that was not cast or forged, but that had evolved."

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Tiny Muscles Help Bats Fine-tune Flight

Tiny Muscles Help Bats Fine-tune Flight | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Bats appear to use a network of hair-thin muscles in their wing skin to control the stiffness and shape of their wings as they fly, according to a new study. The finding provides new insight about the aerodynamic fine-tuning of membrane wings, both natural and man-made.
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What Investors Can Learn From Sea Slugs

What Investors Can Learn From Sea Slugs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"We all know that crystal clear feeling that comes after a spell of unplugged time, especially if that time is spent outdoors.  For over 20 years as a professional investor, I've relished these small windows of escape, and my work has benefitted from the clarity that they bring.  More recently I've wondered, what if that clarity could last longer than my sunburn does?  What if instead of being a place to escape, nature could become my personal and professional mentor?"

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Cyborg-Like Bionics Harness Sunlight

Cyborg-Like Bionics Harness Sunlight | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Using design principles that marry the building-blocks of biological organisms to semiconductors, researchers are creating the precursors of bionic supra-particles that could someday be assembled into cybernetic organisms -- cyborgs...".

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Spiders Spin Possible Solution to 'Sticky' Problems

Spiders Spin Possible Solution to 'Sticky' Problems | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers at The University of Akron are again spinning inspiration from spider silk — this time to create more efficient and stronger commercial and biomedical adhesives that could, for example, potentially attach tendons to bones or bind fractures. The Akron scientists created synthetic duplicates of the super-sticky, silk “attachment discs” that spiders use to attach their webs to surfaces. These discs are created when spiders pin down an underlying thread of silk with additional threads, like stiches or staples..."

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Self-Healing Plastic Works Like Blood Clots To Repair Damage

Self-Healing Plastic Works Like Blood Clots To Repair Damage | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
There's a new kind of self-healing plastic that works similar to the way blood helps heal wounds in humans, patching holes with coagulating fluids.
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