Biomimicry
Follow
Find
32.9K views | +16 today
 
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
onto Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

Lean 3P Design More Humanistic by Going Back to Nature

Lean 3P Design More Humanistic by Going Back to Nature | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"In the Lean Design we use a process that is called Lean 3P. One of the most contentious part of 3P is this idea of looking to nature, to try to find solutions to the problems you're trying to solve. We begin by looking at all the value adding steps."

 

Photo details: Great Horned Owl, Mission Road, Vernon, British Columbia. Copyright © 2012, Alan D. Wilson. http://www.naturespicsonline.com

more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Moth Eyes, Lotus Leaf Biomimicry To Boost Solar Efficiency

Moth Eyes, Lotus Leaf Biomimicry To Boost Solar Efficiency | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

The atomic structure of a moth’s eye and lotus leaves have inspired scientists to create a new glass coating that could increase the efficiency of solar panels by up to six per cent. “While lotus leaves repel water and self-clean when it rains, a moth’s eyes are antireflective because of naturally covered tapered nanostructures where the refractive index gradually increases as light travels to the moth’s cornea,” said Tolga Aytug, member of ORNL’s Materials Chemistry Group. “Combined, these features provide truly game-changing ability to design coatings for specific properties and performance.”"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Robotic Arm Inspired by Octopus Tentacles Aimed at Helping Surgeons

Robotic Arm Inspired by Octopus Tentacles Aimed at Helping Surgeons | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Surgeries might be easier and safer due to a new invention by researchers from the Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies in Italy, a robotic arm that was inspired by tentacles of an octopus. 

The robotic arm device moves by using its inflatable chambers, imitating the natural motion of an octopus twisting and elongating its tentacles in any direction it desires."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

A Robotic "Hand" Based on the Chameleon's Tongue

A Robotic "Hand" Based on the Chameleon's Tongue | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Mechanical robot grippers are designed to grasp specific shapes. This is perfect for assembly lines, where every object is the same. But what if a more flexible solution were required? Think of a conveyor belt covered with random junk that needed to be sorted for recycling:

Imagine a robot hand that needs to pick up a can, a glass dish, a plastic bottle cap, a paper clip, et cetera, all on the fly.

 

Enter the FlexShapeGripper, which eschews metal claws for a silicone bag filled with fluid [...] Fascinatingly, the FlexShapeGripper was inspired by a lizard: the chameleon is able to catch a variety of different insects by putting its tongue over the respective prey and securely enclosing it. The FlexShapeGripper uses this principle to grip the widest range of objects in a form-fitting manner. Using its elastic silicone cap, it can even pick up several objects in a single gripping process and put them down together, without the need for a manual conversion." 

Miguel Prazeres's insight:

Check out the accompanying video.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Low-reflection Wings Make Butterflies Nearly Invisible

Low-reflection Wings Make Butterflies Nearly Invisible | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The effect is known from the smart phone: Sun is reflected by the display and hardly anything can be seen. In contrast to this, the glasswing butterfly hardly reflects any light in spite of its transparent wings. As a result, it is difficult for predatory birds to track the butterfly during the flight. Researchers of KIT under the direction of Hendrik Hölscher found that irregular nanostructures on the surface of the butterfly wing cause the low reflection. In theoretical experiments, they succeeded in reproducing the effect that opens up fascinating application options, e.g. for displays of mobile phones or laptops."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Pressurised Structures – Cacti

Pressurised Structures – Cacti | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A cactus (plural: cacti, cactuses, or cactus) is a member of the plant family Cactaceae, within the order Caryophyllales and is a succulent system that contains pressurised water that gives the organism structural stability as well as being a fundamental life source.

Being a water-container, means that there is no need for other rigid structure such as bark to give structural performance against external loads. Water is an element already in compression and similar structural strategies have been derived from this natural phenomenon in man-made hydraulic structures." 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

101 Nature-inspired Innovations Featured in "Tapping into Nature" White Paper

101 Nature-inspired Innovations Featured in "Tapping into Nature" White Paper | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"By tapping into billions of years of research and development, innovative companies are abstracting strategies from the natural world and developing truly transformative technologies. Organisms have flourished on Earth for nearly 4 billion years, continuously adapting to our planet’s diverse environments and diffuse energy flows. Tapping into Nature explores how pioneering companies are leveraging these adaptations and demonstrates the vast and largely untapped market potential of bioinspired innovation. In this paper, Terrapin explores nine cross-sector topics and selects natural strategies related to each. The biological strategies represent only a fraction of the designs found in nature. Each section then presents bioinspired products—some of which are Terrapin collaborations—that have been developed by companies using these strategies. All told, this set of strategies and products begins to convey the breadth of innovation in the natural world."

 

Miguel Prazeres's insight:

Excellent report, freely available to the general public.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

What if Companies and Their Buildings Actually Enhanced Ecosystems?

What if Companies and Their Buildings Actually Enhanced Ecosystems? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"What if building codes actually required new projects to enhance a certain number of ecosystem services — such as sequestering carbon, building topsoil, enhancing pollination, increasing biodiversity or purifying water and air? Is it possible that a city could be functionally indistinguishable from the wild landscape around it? And what if companies ultimately built factories that truly enhanced ecosystem services?!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Festo's Fantastical Insectoid Robots Include Bionic Ants and Butterflies

Festo's Fantastical Insectoid Robots Include Bionic Ants and Butterflies | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The German automation giant unleashes a swarm of new robotic insects. [...] The theme of Festo’s “Bionic Learning Network” program this year is “Join the Network,” and their flagship projects are both based around swarms of small robots that mimic the way insects work together and interact with each other."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

We Need Regenerative Farming, Not Geoengineering

We Need Regenerative Farming, Not Geoengineering | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The mindset behind geoengineering stands in sharp contrast to an emerging ecological, systems approach taking shape in the form of regenerative agriculture. More than a mere alternative strategy, regenerative agriculture represents a fundamental shift in our culture’s relationship to nature. Regenerative agriculture comprises an array of techniques that rebuild soil and, in the process, sequester carbon. Typically, it uses cover crops and perennials so that bare soil is never exposed, and grazes animals in ways that mimic animals in nature. It also offers ecological benefits far beyond carbon storage: it stops soil erosion, remineralises soil, protects the purity of groundwater and reduces damaging pesticide and fertiliser runoff."

 

Photo details: Abandoned Bailer Johnson Road. Copyright © 2009, Alan D. Wilson. http://www.naturespicsonline.com

more...
Max Hardy's curator insight, March 28, 9:24 PM

Great story. If you are into systems theory, appreciative inquiry and ecology, then check this out. Yes, we can become collective smarter about so many things. 

Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Kalundborg Symbiosis

Kalundborg Symbiosis | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
"Kalundborg Symbiosis is the world’s first well-functioning example of industrial symbiosis and, within the academic discipline of industrial ecology, has become a textbook example of effective resource saving and cycling of materials in industrial production."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Urban Infrastructure: What Would Nature Do?

Urban Infrastructure: What Would Nature Do? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"When urban infrastructure meets nature’s designers, amazing things can happen. More and more, biomimicry is being thought of as a way to reconsider the ways we build and operate cities. Today, these lessons are being actively applied in the realm of urban infrastructure and design in an effort to make places that are more sustainable, more livable, more intuitively designed and, at their core, more natural."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

What Your Bones Have in Common With the Eiffel Tower

What Your Bones Have in Common With the Eiffel Tower | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The Eiffel Tower weighs less than the air around it. It achieves this by exploiting the same structural ideas that make your bones so strong yet so light.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Startup Uses Biomimicry to Create High-Performance Metal Alloys

Startup Uses Biomimicry to Create High-Performance Metal Alloys | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Used widely in nature, lamination – the deposition of fine layers of materials on top of one another – has long been known as a means of manufacturing stronger, more durable and longer lasting metals. Founded in 2006, Seattle’s Modumetal is applying the process of lamination at nano-scale, enabling engineers to design and fabricate metals with superior performance characteristics and at lower cost than conventional methods."

more...
Elke B. Bachler's curator insight, April 4, 6:16 AM

Quote: "Used widely in nature, lamination – the deposition of fine layers of materials on top of one another – has long been known as a means of manufacturing stronger, more durable and longer lasting metals." 

Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Electronic Memory May Bring Bionic Brain One Step Closer

Electronic Memory May Bring Bionic Brain One Step Closer | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Using a matrix of nano-sized memristors, researchers working at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) and the University of California, Santa Barbara claim to have constructed the world’s first electronic memory cell that effectively mimics the analog process of the human brain. By storing memories as multiple threads of varying information, rather than a collection of ones and zeroes, scientists believe that this device may prove to be the first step towards creating a completely artificial, bionic brain.   Working at the MicroNano Research Facility of RMIT, the researchers believe that the breakthrough not only carries them closer to reproducing key aspects of the human brain electronically, but could also one day assist in providing effective treatments for neurological conditions – such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases – by studying such diseases outside the body using artificial brains. Eventually, even cybernetic implants could conceivably be developed from this technology."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

New Nano Materials Inspired by Bird Feathers Play with Light to Create Color

New Nano Materials Inspired by Bird Feathers Play with Light to Create Color | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Inspired by the way iridescent bird feathers play with light, scientists have created thin films of material in a wide range of pure colors — from red to green — with hues determined by physical structure rather than pigments.

Structural color arises from the interaction of light with materials that have patterns on a minute scale, which bend and reflect light to amplify some wavelengths and dampen others. Melanosomes, tiny packets of melanin found in the feathers, skin and fur of many animals, can produce structural color when packed into solid layers, as they are in the feathers of some birds. 

“We synthesized and assembled nanoparticles of a synthetic version of melanin to mimic the natural structures found in bird feathers,” said Nathan Gianneschi, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego. “We want to understand how nature uses materials like this, then to develop function that goes beyond what is possible in nature."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Battery Research: Bionics Reduces Filling Time

Battery Research: Bionics Reduces Filling Time | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The latest development by engineers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT, Germany) is inspired by nature. To fill the porous electrodes of lithium-ion batteries more rapidly with liquid electrolyte, they use a physico-chemical effect that also provides for transport in trees. increases the throughput of battery production and reduces investment costs." 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Glass Sponges Hold Internal Secrets to Structural Strength

Glass Sponges Hold Internal Secrets to Structural Strength | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Scientists often look to biology for inspiration and innovation, emulating the way that nature builds to advance human engineering. Creatures of the ocean's depths are some of the most mysterious and fascinating subjects for study, due to the challenges of collecting them from very deep waters and for their unique adaptations for colonizing the sea floor. One such group is the hexactinellids, a collection of predominantly deep-sea sponges that produce elaborate skeletal systems of glass. Known as glass sponges, over the years their skeletal systems and their constituent elements (called spicules) have served as useful model systems for the design and fabrication of robust and damage tolerance."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Fish and Flowers Inspire Diving Goggle Material

Fish and Flowers Inspire Diving Goggle Material | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Light scattering means that many synthetic oil-repellent surfaces are opaque, limiting their use. A transparent, oil-repellent surface would have applications in biology and underwater optics, including in diving goggles and cameras. Now, Feng Chen’s research group at Xi’an Jiaotong University has developed such a material. Fish repel oil by trapping water within their scales to create a self-cleaning, oil-repellent coat and prompted part of the idea behind the work. Chen’s other brainwave was triggered by Diphylleia grayi – also known as the skeleton flower."

more...
lavieepanouie's curator insight, April 22, 5:16 PM

Ou comment la nature nous inspire !

Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Software Is Using Biomimicry to Optimize Part Design

Software Is Using Biomimicry to Optimize Part Design | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"As additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, becomes more and more sophisticated and capable of direct production in some applications, a class of software is emerging that exploits the capability of AM technology to produce objects in a highly freeform manner. Engineering and manufacturing software giant Autodesk refers to this emerging model as goal-directed design (GDD). Autodesk is building a GDD CAD system called Dreamcatcher, now under development at its research lab while deployed in beta form to a number of the firm's customers.[...] Rather than defining a part in great detail from the top down, in bio-inspired computer-aided design, the user gives the software a set of fundamental rules and lets it seek out the optimal solution to a problem. Autodesk’s GDD system turns CAD on its head in a similar way; as opposed to a starting point of inputting the desired geometry, Dreamcatcher's bio-inspired algorithms generate the optimal design solution, employing whatever geometry solves the problem."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

​In the Future, Your City Could Change Colors Like an Octopus

​In the Future, Your City Could Change Colors Like an Octopus | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Most of us were born and will die a certain color, but octopuses are masters of their hue, changing from transparent to shades of red, pink, purple and blue by stretching and relaxing their skin. If we could unlock their secret and wrap our buildings in octopus skin, then city skylines might shimmer a spectrum of colors and opacities as the sun waxed and waned."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Can nature unlock the potential of additive manufacturing?

Can nature unlock the potential of additive manufacturing? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"If the ultimate prize in additive manufacturing is finding a universal kit of parts, then recent nature-inspired developments in small molecule chemistry may have brought us closer to this world of the future."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Poisonous Frogs Inspire De-icing Tech for Planes

Poisonous Frogs Inspire De-icing Tech for Planes | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Although spring is finally here, the nightmare of winter flight delays is still fresh in many frequent flyers’ minds. However, these delays could soon become a thing of the past, and we have poisonous frogs to thank. Researchers from Arizona State University believe they have found a way for plane wings to de-ice themselves by secreting anti-freeze, much in the same way a poisonous dart frog’s skin secretes a toxin when threatened."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Butterfly-Inspired Building

Butterfly-Inspired Building | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The rare blue morpho butterfly is among the largest butterflies in the world and one of the most spectacular with its brown wings that suddenly turn iridescent blue. This amazing display happens when blue light reflects off the layers of microscopic scales on its wings. 3M scientists studied the butterfly to mimic this effect in a window film."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Chameleon-like Material Changes Color On Demand

Chameleon-like Material Changes Color On Demand | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers at the University of California at Berkeley announced today that they have developed an ultra-thin material that can change color on demand by bouncing back light on the nanoscale level. Well, the on-demand element is a little more nuanced. The “chameleon skin” material actually changes color when flexed, or when a small amount of force is applied to the surface."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Plants Exhibit a Wide Range of Mechanical Properties, Engineers Find

Plants Exhibit a Wide Range of Mechanical Properties, Engineers Find | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"From an engineer’s perspective, plants such as palm trees, bamboo, maples and even potatoes are examples of precise engineering on a microscopic scale. Like wooden beams reinforcing a house, cell walls make up the structural supports of all plants. Depending on how the cell walls are arranged, and what they are made of, a plant can be as flimsy as a reed, or as sturdy as an oak. An MIT researcher has compiled data on the microstructures of a number of different plants, from apples and potatoes to willow and spruce trees, and has found that plants exhibit an enormous range of mechanical properties, depending on the arrangement of a cell wall’s four main building blocks: cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and pectin. Lorna Gibson, the Matoula S. Salapatas Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at MIT, says understanding plants’ microscopic organization may help engineers design new, bio-inspired materials."

more...
Elke B. Bachler's curator insight, April 4, 6:14 AM

There is still so very much useful to discover in nature!