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Companies that Mimic Nature Out-perform Those That Do Not

Companies that Mimic Nature Out-perform Those That Do Not | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Companies that mimic living systems have been gaining market share over more traditionally managed firms, which generally model themselves on mechanical systems. Firms that mimic living systems have an existential awareness that they are living communities of people, committed to serving other people, and that they all depend on Nature for their sustenance. This fundamental recognition creates spontaneous demands within the firm to live harmoniously and respectfully with the larger living systems on which we all depend (biosphere, society, markets).

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Nature and Mathematics Join Forces to Cut the Cost of 3D Printing

Nature and Mathematics Join Forces to Cut the Cost of 3D Printing | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Making curved shapes on a 3D printer often involves laying down support material which has to be cut away and disposed of at the end.

Printing the support material adds to the cost, slows the process down, generates waste and results in additional work to finish the component where the support has been cut away. The DPG team decided to investigate ways of developing self-supporting printed structures as part of a continuing project to design and develop a fixed wing Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, or UAV. Designers used fractal mathematics, which generates repeating patterns, to create an intricate internal structure for the wing, resembling that of an insect, where repeating patterns of veins strengthen the wing, while allowing its surface to remain flexible."

 

Photo details: "Ischnura senegalensis October 2007" by Laitche. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons.

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Contracting Muscle Grown in Lab for the First TIme

Contracting Muscle Grown in Lab for the First TIme | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A team of engineers at Duke University has created the world's first human-made human muscle that can respond to stimuli. The muscle tissue can contract when exposed to electric and chemical stimuli.
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Tree-shaped Wind-turbines Shows Biomimicry at its Best

Tree-shaped Wind-turbines Shows Biomimicry at its Best | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"... a French company called NewWind has been developing aesthetically pleasing, tree-shaped turbines meant to run silently within cities, at ground level. The innovation is simple named “L’Arbre à Vent” or in English “The Wind Tree”. The tree features 72 artificial leaves where each leave is a small turbine that rotates around a vertically directed axis. The leaves are very light-weight, which means that they can generate power from very small amounts of wind. Actually it takes nothing more than 4.4 mph (2 meters/second) of wind for them to function, and this is amount of wind is equal to a gentle breeze."


Photo: Michaud LARIVIERE, http://www.cite-telecoms.com/decouvr/arbre-a-vent/

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ibexerain's comment, January 13, 12:10 AM
Sensational looking
Michael Holder's curator insight, January 13, 6:43 PM

Perhaps the beginning of the end and the extinction of mammoth Industrial Wind Turbines and their globally corrupt Corporate boon-doggle. One can only hope - good riddance!  

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Dutch Scientists Create Concrete that Heals Itself With Built-in Bacteria

Dutch Scientists Create Concrete that Heals Itself With Built-in Bacteria | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Scientists in the Netherlands have created a bio-concrete blend with built-in bacteria that can patch up small cracks and holes in cement. Activated by water, the bacteria would eat food provided in the concrete mixture to combine calcium with oxygen and carbon dioxide to form what is essentially limestone."

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Impeller Technology Inspired by Nature

Impeller Technology Inspired by Nature | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The core of PAX Water’s mixing technology is the highly efficient and powerful Lily impeller – a biomimetic technology used to solve potable water challenges. Inventor Jay Harman developed the Lily impeller after studying fluid flow efficiencies in natural systems, such as air and ocean currents. He observed that nature never moves in a straight line, and instead tends to flow in a spiraling path he called nature’s Streamlining Principle."

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How Birds’ Beaks Could Solve Water Shortages

How Birds’ Beaks Could Solve Water Shortages | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The Idea: Collect water from fog in deserts and other regions where water is scarce using a method borrowed from birds. Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington observed shorebirds such as phalaropes opening and closing their beaks in order to move water towards their mouths. The unusual drinking method inspired the researchers to create a beak-like fog collector. Composed of two plates joined at one end by a hinge, the collector accumulates water droplets on the inner surfaces of its “beak” while in the open position. Closing the “beak” merges tiny droplets into larger drops, which are able to roll towards the collection tube located near the hinge."

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Researchers Create Stunning 3D Printed, Programmable, Bio-Inspired Architectural Materials

Researchers Create Stunning 3D Printed, Programmable, Bio-Inspired Architectural Materials | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Biological systems often have the ability to adapt to their environments. They harness external atmospheric stimuli, and as a result, triggers are activated which might result in kinematic shape or chemical changes to a given system or plant. Performance challenges – when pitted against a series of resource limitations like humidity or lack of water – can provoke complex and multi-layered structural changes in plants, and nature regularly makes use of various strategies and materials to deal with those challenges.[...] University of Stuttgart Professor Achim Menges, a registered architect and the founding director of the Institute for Computational Design, is also a visiting professor in architecture at Harvard University, and his practice and research are devoted to creating integral design processes at the nexus of “morphogenetic design computation, biomimetic engineering and computer aided manufacturing."

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Ollie Cline's curator insight, December 15, 2014 11:30 PM

add your insight...

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Studying Owls to Improve Aircraft

Studying Owls to Improve Aircraft | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Many owls have the extraordinary ability to fly in almost complete silence. Could this adaptation have implications for the way we design aircraft?

 

Photo details: Snowy Owl, Saint Barthelemy, Near Montreal, Quebec. Copyright © 2010, Alan D. Wilson. http://www.naturespicsonline.com

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Yves Bonis's curator insight, December 9, 2014 3:51 AM

Le vol silencieux des hiboux a déjà inspiré le Shinkansen - le "TGV" japonais. Il pourrait bien aider également l'aviation...

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Biomimetic Filters Recover Clean Water From Sludge

Biomimetic Filters Recover Clean Water From Sludge | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"San Jose-based zNano is getting attention for what could be a breakthrough technology designed to recover clean water from sludge. [...] The company draws on a process called biomimetic filtration. This process is the subject a growing body of research. "Biomimetic filters, according to Susan Rempe, a principal researcher in the nanobiology department at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico, mimic the structure of naturally filtering cellular water membranes," theBusiness Journalreport said. Rempe said the membranes are “exactly the same chemically as those that purify water in the human body, [and which are one of the most efficient purification systems]," the report said."

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Robot That Moves Like an Inchworm Could Go Places Other Robots Can't

Robot That Moves Like an Inchworm Could Go Places Other Robots Can't | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The peculiar way that an inchworm inches along a surface may not be fast compared to using legs, wings, or wheels, but it does have advantages when it comes to maneuvering in small spaces. This is one of the reasons why researchers have designed and built a soft, worm-like robot that moves with a typical inchworm gait, pulling its body up and extending it forward to navigate its environment. The robots could one day be used in rescue and reconnaissance missions in places that are inaccessible to humans or larger robots.."

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Biomimicry Incubators: the Business Case for Conservation

Biomimicry Incubators: the Business Case for Conservation | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The business opportunities found in biomimicry - the application of characteristics found in species to human innovation - makes a strong case for biodiversity conservation, says Siloso Beach Resort sustainability director Sylvain Richer de Forges."

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Yves Bonis's curator insight, December 1, 2014 3:22 PM

Idée géniale : Inclure dans chaque entreprise un service Biomimétisme qui inspire et infuse dans toute la structure.

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Nano-imprint Technology Could Revolutionize TVs, Drugmaking

Nano-imprint Technology Could Revolutionize TVs, Drugmaking | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Nano-imprint technology, a technique in which microscopic indentations are made on an object's surface, is changing the nature of various products, including TV screens, semiconductors and tissue cultures. One application already being used is in making so-called moth-eye film, a transparent film developed by Dai Nippon Printing that reflects almost no light. This film is modeled after a moth's eyes, which are known for reflecting little to no light, allowing the insect to better hide from predators. This is achieved by minute bumps that are around 200 nanometers, 200 billionths of a meter, in diameter. Nano-imprint technology helped researchers create such surfaces on film."

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Longhorn Beetle Inspires Ink to Fight Counterfeiting

Longhorn Beetle Inspires Ink to Fight Counterfeiting | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"From water marks to colored threads, governments are constantly adding new features to paper money to stay one step ahead of counterfeiters. Now a longhorn beetle has inspired yet another way to foil cash fraud, as well as to produce colorful, changing billboards and art displays. In the journal ACS Nano, researchers report a new kind of ink that mimics the beetle’s color-shifting ability in a way that would be long-lasting and difficult to copy."

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Plant Roots Mimicked to Develop Soil-Monitoring Robots

Plant Roots Mimicked to Develop Soil-Monitoring Robots | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"...a number of technologies have emerged from the study and mimicry of plants and the way in which their roots function. One such example is a project called the Innovative Robotic Artefacts Inspired by Plant Roots for Soil Monitoring - or PLANTOID for short - a European Commission-funded research project into the behaviour of roots with the aim of developing advanced soil monitoring technologies."

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Memo to Carmakers: This Fish Is a Bad Model

Memo to Carmakers: This Fish Is a Bad Model | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"In 2005, Mercedes-Benz revealed a concept car with a strange shape. Called the Bionic, the cartoonishly snub-nosed vehicle was modeled after Ostracion cubicus, the yellow boxfish. Car manufacturers aren’t the only ones to take inspiration from this weird coral dweller. But researchers now say engineers who mimicked the boxfish might have been misled."

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Tommies 2014: the Best of Bio-inspired Designs

Tommies 2014: the Best of Bio-inspired Designs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
It’s time for the sixth annual Tommies, my salute to the best of bio-inspired designs of 2014. As always, the 10 awardees are organized according to the natural organism inspiring the innovation. This year’s cohort includes a range of clever developments and ideas that have been percolating for some years but were advanced in significant ways this year. I hope you find my picks of 2014 as fascinating as I have. Wishing all of my readers a bright and bio-inspired New Year!
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New Life for The Artificial Leaf?

New Life for The Artificial Leaf? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Research in laboratories around the world is moving the promise of artificial photosynthesis closer to reality

 

Photo details: A Leaf, Jon Sullivan, Wikimedia Commons, 2003, Public domain.

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Emmanuel Baeten's curator insight, January 4, 12:50 PM

 Production of a kilogram of hydrogen, the fuel equivalent of a gallon of gasoline, for approximately 2 USD.

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Nonadhesion Technology: Yogurt Lid Licking Be Banished

Nonadhesion Technology: Yogurt Lid Licking Be Banished | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Part of the yogurt eating ritual has always been licking the food off the foil lid. Over the course of a year, the yogurt stuck to lids worldwide is equivalent to the volume consumed in Africa, according to a calculation by Toyo Aluminium. Morinaga Milk Industry is doing something about that: Its lids peel off clean with no stuck yogurt. The company uses a special lid developed in cooperation with Toyo Aluminium. It is based on a packaging technology Toyo calls "Toyal Lotus." The material's structural inspiration was the lotus leaf, which is famous for its ability to shed water and remain dry."

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Swarms of Bees Inspired this Energy-saving Innovation

Swarms of Bees Inspired this Energy-saving Innovation | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"When it comes to managing a building’s cooling and heating costs, just look up. It turns out there’s a lot to be learned from the birds and the bees, according to Toronto-based REGEN Energy. The clean tech firm co-ordinates HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) systems by tapping into the ability of insect colonies and flocks of birds to display a greater collective intelligence."

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Eben Lenderking's curator insight, December 29, 2014 4:44 AM
En Ingles...Another reason to love bees and what the natural world can teach us...
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Spider-inspired Sensor Can Detect Human Speech and Pulse

Spider-inspired Sensor Can Detect Human Speech and Pulse | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The wandering spider boasts one of the world’s most sensitive vibration detectors: It can pick up the slightest rustling of a leaf from several meters away. Now, scientists have developed similar sensors that can detect simple human speech. The technology could lead to wearable electronics for speech recognition, health monitoring, and more."

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Learning Anti-microbial Nanoscale Physics From Cicada

Learning Anti-microbial Nanoscale Physics From Cicada | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The spread of antimicrobial resistance with the emergence of 'super-bugs' that resist even 'last-resort' antibiotics has prompted the World Health Organisation (WHO) to formally tackle the problem of an unwanted post-antibiotic era. [...] A notable solution is provided by an unlikely source - the cicada.The wings of this small fly display bactericidal nanoscale pillar structures. Each of these pillars is a pike of several tens of nanometers in diameter and is separated from other pikes at regular nanometer intervals. Densely packed on the wing surfaces, these pillars arrange into nanopatterns which pierce the membranes of bacterial cells on contact, tearing bacteria apart. Inspired by this example, a research team from NPL and the School of Oral and Dental Sciences at the University of Bristol engineered biocompatible surfaces exhibiting nanowire arrays."

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Scientists Figure Out How To Scale Walls Like Spider-Man

Scientists Figure Out How To Scale Walls Like Spider-Man | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A team of researchers at Stanford has developed a way to scale glass walls using pads that attach to a person's hands. [...] The inspiration behind the design was not actually Spider-Man, but the gecko, which is able to climb up a variety of surfaces using what are known as van der Waals forces. To replicate these electric forces, the Stanford team created hexagon-shaped pads about the size of pingpong paddles. They then covered them in tiny tiles made from polydimethylsiloxane -- a silicon material commonly found in water-repellant coatings. The material itself isn't actually sticky like tape or glue. Like a gecko's toes, the tiles have tiny nanofibers that make the pads strong enough to cling to glass surfaces. Flexible springs behind the tiles help to distribute the weight."

 

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Bat-inspired Sonar Device Aids the Visually Impaired

Bat-inspired Sonar Device Aids the Visually Impaired | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Unlike Batman, bats don’t rely on projections in the sky to tell them where to go; they navigate by calling and judging where the sounds echo off objects. This sound-based system inspired a team at Wake Forest University, North Carolina, to create a sonar device to help the blind to get around more easily."

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Innovative by Nature: Airbus Establishes a Company-wide Network for Bionics Projects

Innovative by Nature: Airbus Establishes a Company-wide Network for Bionics Projects | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Airbus believes that much can be learned by studying the natural world, and in putting this philosophy into practice as a global innovation leader, the company has launched numerous projects inspired by biological systems and methods in order to develop new technical solutions. [...] One bionics project at Airbus seeks a new method for stiffening surfaces by leveraging physical qualities of the Victoria water lily (Victoria amazonica) – which has intrigued engineers with its superior ability to support significant point loads. The plant’s leaf vein structure provides Airbus with a model for reinforcing surfaces, and can now be found on the inner surface of a 3D-printed aircraft spoiler drawn up as part of a concept study." 

 
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The Land Institute Permaculture

The Land Institute Permaculture | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Perennial grain cropping, or permaculture, is a form of agriculture developed to mimic natural systems. This strategy takes advantage of benefits found in natural systems, such as resilience to most perturbations, self-regulation, accumulation of "ecological capital," stable soils, carbon sequestration, nutrient cycling, food production, and biodiversity."

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Norma R. Burnson's curator insight, December 18, 2014 5:32 AM

Sustainable  Food for the Globe.  Permaculture.  Check it out!  ..."The Land Institute was founded by Wes Jackson and is located in Kansas where prototypes of perennial grain plants are grown to test theories of natural systems agriculture. Its mission statement is, "When people, land, and community are as one, all three members prosper; when they relate not as members but as competing interests, all three are exploited. By consulting Nature as the source and measure of that membership, The Land Institute seeks to develop an agriculture that will save soil from being lost or poisoned while promoting a community life at once prosperous and enduring."  +++++    




 

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