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Biomimetic Self-templating Supramolecular Structures

Biomimetic Self-templating Supramolecular Structures | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

A team consisting out of researchers from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, has discovered a method to create artificial materials with desired properties by controlling the assembly of these complex structures. To achieve this effect, the researchers used bacteriophage as the building block which mimicked the ability of natural tissues to self-assemble from cellular proteins.

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Nature Inspired Self-cleaning Windows Developed

Nature Inspired Self-cleaning Windows Developed | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"UCL researchers have developed a revolutionary new type of ‘smart’ window which could cut window-cleaning costs in tall buildings while reducing heating bills and boosting worker productivity. The windows use nature inspired nanostructures which mimic the eyes of moths to cut glare, save energy and clean themselves."

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Bge Innovation's curator insight, January 25, 3:18 PM

un nouveau verre associant nano structures en cônes et dioxyde de vanadium, pour éviter salissures, éblouissement et échanges thermiques

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Community Credit: The Next Generation of Financial Architecture

Community Credit: The Next Generation of Financial Architecture | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Biomimicry offers a new language, longer timeframe, wider lens, and better-rooted framework overall for thinking about system design. It allows us to finally step “outside” (literally and figuratively) the narrow conceptual models of finance that are currently sinking our collective ship. How would nature design a financial system? This blog post is adapted from a short presentation I gave at SXSW Eco on this question.

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Good Vibrations: Spider Signal Threads Reveal Remote Sensing Design Secrets

Good Vibrations: Spider Signal Threads Reveal Remote Sensing Design Secrets | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"When you look at a spider web in the garden, one thing is often noticeably absent: the spider. This may be because it is lurking away from the web in a 'retreat', where it can monitor web vibrations through a proxy known as a signal thread. A new Oxford study published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface looks in more detail at the composition and structure of these signal threads, which spiders can use to tell whether they've caught new prey. [...] 'Learning from nature, signal threads could provide inspiration for the development of new remote sensing technologies."

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Hairy Animals Teach Us How to Keep Robots Clean

Hairy Animals Teach Us How to Keep Robots Clean | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Drones and other autonomous vehicles, including Mars rovers, are susceptible to failure because of the accumulation of dirt and other airborne particles that interfere with electronics and sensors. Associate professor David Hu and his colleagues from Georgia Institute of Technology scrutinized more than two dozen studies and analyzed 27 animals to better understand how the critters kept clean. What the scientists found could improve the way sensitive electronics, robots, sensors and unmanned aerial vehicles are kept free of pollen and dirt."

 
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Blue Tarantulas May Help Humans Make Better Wide-angle Computer Displays

Blue Tarantulas May Help Humans Make Better Wide-angle Computer Displays | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"At least 40 species of tarantulas come in shades of blue.  [...] To find out more about the "tarantula blue," researchers used different microscopy techniques to analyze tarantula hairs. They found that although these species share a shade of blue, tarantulas don't use pigments to produce it. Instead, the blue colors are produced thanks to nanostructures in the spiders' hair, which reflect blue light. And these nanostructures differ between species, the scientists found. Most importantly, however, these blue colors don’t change intensity or hue as the viewing angle changes. That's a big differentiator from the highly iridescent structural colors seen in most birds, butterflies, and beetles."

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Bubble Surfing Brings Savings

Bubble Surfing Brings Savings | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Penguins release streams of lubricating bubbles from their feathers to help them surge out of the sea. Now shipping engineers and operators are looking for similar ways to reduce friction between ships and sea water, with a system that releases air to create a carpet of bubbles along the bottom of the ship."

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Ford Looks to Make its Cars Easier to Recycle with Gecko Inspired Adhesive

Ford Looks to Make its Cars Easier to Recycle with Gecko Inspired Adhesive | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Dearborn, Michigan based car maker, Ford Motor Company, is working with Procter & Gamble to develop an adhesive inspired by geckos to improve the recyclability of its cars. Ford said that its researchers have considered ways to make auto manufacturing more sustainable for years. A key challenge is glue used to adhere foams to plastics and metals can make disassembling parts for recycling nearly impossible.

Enter the gecko. The company explained that the lizard’s toe pads allow it to stick to most surfaces without liquids or surface tension. The reptile can then easily release itself, leaving no residue.  [...] According to Debbie Mielewski, Ford senior technical leader for plastics and sustainability research, the gecko could inspire a host of adhesive innovations for global applications at Ford."

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Learning From Nature: Architects and Biomimicry

Learning From Nature: Architects and Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

From creating breathable metals to copying how animals cool their homes, architects and designers are increasingly using the principles of biomimicry in their work. Christopher DeWolf takes a look at how the discipline is evolving.

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This Artificial "Leaf" Can Produce Fuels From Carbon Dioxide And Sunlight

This Artificial "Leaf" Can Produce Fuels From Carbon Dioxide And Sunlight | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers say they have developed an artificial "leaf” that can produce fuels such as methane and gasoline from carbon dioxide. The team claimed it is a major step towards using fuels made renewably from sunlight for everything from heating our homes to running cars, without emitting any greenhouse gases. The breakthrough, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was led by Peidong Yang and his team at the Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute at the University of California, Berkeley. It builds on the natural process of photosynthesis, where water and carbon dioxide are turned into sugar – organic fuel – by plants. By tweaking the process, via synthetic photosynthesis, it could be possible to create a whole host of different products."

 

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Mark William's curator insight, October 6, 2015 4:52 AM
Fuels can be produced by this artificial "Leaf" from Sunlight and Carbon Dioxide
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Ecologist Develops Elephant-inspired Hearing Aid

Ecologist Develops Elephant-inspired Hearing Aid | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"American ecologist and hearing specialist Caitlin O'Connell-Rodwell is developing a new hearing aid inspired by elephants. Along with sound, elephants pick up ground-based vibrations, as the skin of their feet and trunks contains mechanoreceptors that can sense them. [...] She has partnered with HNU Photonics, a research company based on Maui, Hawaii, to develop a patch that adheres to the skin; this transduces sound into vibrations, which the braininterprets as a kind of Braille or Morse code."

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Boxfish Shell Inspires New Materials for Body Armor and Flexible Electronics

Boxfish Shell Inspires New Materials for Body Armor and Flexible Electronics | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The boxfish’s unique armor draws its strength from hexagon-shaped scales and the connections between them, engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have found. They describe their findings and the carapace of the boxfish (Lactoria cornuta) in the July 27 issue of the journal Acta Materialia. Engineers also describe how the structure of the boxfish could serve as inspiration for body armor, robots and even flexible elctronics."

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Water Bear Inspires New Kind of Glass

Water Bear Inspires New Kind of Glass | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A really weird, really tiny animal — the microscopic tardigrade — is the inspiration behind a new material that could improve the efficiency of things like LED lights to solar cells. The material under investigation is glass, and tardigrades (sometimes known as "water bears" or "moss piglets") know a thing or two about glass. These water-dwelling critters, which look like tiny blimps with pudgy bodies and eight stubby legs, are capable of shedding almost all of the water in their cells when exposed to extreme conditions, such as heat, cold or even the vacuum of space."

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Biomimetics 3D Printing Challenge Now Open

Biomimetics 3D Printing Challenge Now Open | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Crowdsourced innovation service Innonatives has posted a challenge seeking “radical ideas” on how to combine biomimetics and 3D printing for sustainability.  Innonatives is a platform where any company may post a significant challenge and seek the public’s assistance in solving the issue. In this case, the partnership of Biomimetics Hessen and the Association of German Industrial Designers (VDID) are posting a major challenge. They invite the community to: 


«Present Their most brilliant and radical ideas on how Both techniques (Biomimetics and 3D Printing) can be used in combination to generate radical improvements towards environmental, social and economic sustainability».

 

It’s not clear when the challenge closes, but the ten best ideas as determined by an “expert jury” will be presented in a special event on 15 October in Germany."

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Airbus Starts 3D Printing Airplane Cabin Partition That Mimics Cells and Bones' Structure

Airbus Starts 3D Printing Airplane Cabin Partition That Mimics Cells and Bones' Structure | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Airbus and its subsidiary APWorks, in collaboration with Autodesk-owned architecture firm The Living, has started 3D printing the world’s largest metal 3D printed airplane part. The jet partition, 3D printed in a high-tech alloy called “Scalmalloy”, is 45% lighter than current partitions. [...] To create the most durable and lightweight design possible, the project team sought inspiration from nature. Bionics, which involves examining natural mechanics to see how they could be mimicked in technological devices, has been crucial in the production of the 3D printed component. The jet partition was created with custom algorithms, which generated a design that mimics cellular structure and bone growth. Airbus has also been exploring weight-saving aircraft structures based on the construction of super-strong water lilies, and torsion springs based on fish jaws."

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jibeworks's curator insight, January 19, 6:50 PM

3d Printing is a game changer...

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North Face's New Jacket is Made From Synthetic Spider’s Silk

North Face's New Jacket is Made From Synthetic Spider’s Silk | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Spider's silk is as strong as steel, lighter than carbon fibre and tougher than Kevlar.  Several research groups are hoping harness these remarkable properties by creating synthetic versions of the material.

Now, North Face has partnered with one of these teams to create a jacket made from a fiber named 'Qmonos' – the Japanese word for spider."

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Army Ants Act Like Algorithms to Make Deliveries More Efficient

Army Ants Act Like Algorithms to Make Deliveries More Efficient | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"To optimize its delivery drones, maybe Amazon could take inspiration from the actual Amazon. Army ants in Central and South America aggressively seek out the shortest path over the forest floor to bring home enough food and ensure the future of their colony. This focus on efficiency led the insects to develop a clever trick: They link their bodies together to fill potholes and build living bridges. As more ants join in, the bridges shift locations to span larger and larger gaps, shortening the path ants have to take when carrying food back to the nest. But because each brick in the bridge is also a lost forager, the ants reach a point where a slightly better shortcut just isn’t worth the cost, according to new analysis of this insect construction work."

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Developing Surgical Tools for Snaking Through The Body

Developing Surgical Tools for Snaking Through The Body | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A good deal of work is being done to improve how existing surgical procedures are performed by making rigid tools flexible and steerable. [...] One of the teams at TU Delft developed an arthroscopy tool that has a snake-like tip capable of bending in surprising ways. The so-called MultiFlex is an example of the bio-inspired approach that is at the heart of many of the tools being built at TU Delft. It takes ideas from octopus tentacles that have a bunch of muscle rods near the perimeter that work together to flex the tentacle well enough to be featured in horror movies."

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Engineers Help Discover the Surprising Trick Jellyfish Use to Swim

Engineers Help Discover the Surprising Trick Jellyfish Use to Swim | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Millions of years ago, even before the continents had settled into place, jellyfish were already swimming the oceans with the same pulsing motions we observe today. Now through clever experiments and insightful math, an interdisciplinary research team has revealed a startling truth about how jellyfish and lampreys, another ancient species that undulate like eels, move through the water with unmatched efficiency."

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Scientists Tap Dragonfly Vision to Build a Better Bionic Eye

Scientists Tap Dragonfly Vision to Build a Better Bionic Eye | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers have developed an artificial-intelligence system based on a dragonfly’s vision that they say could aid the blind and help create a better driverless car. [...] In the latest research, published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, scientists showed how a computer program can mimic the eyesight of a dragonfly. Compared with humans, dragonflies have a limited ability to distinguish details and shapes of objects. But they are one of the insect kingdom’s best predators because their wide field of vision and ability to detect fast movements allow them to keep track of prey even among a swarm of insects."

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3D-Printed Robotic Tentacle Reaches New Level of Squirminess

3D-Printed Robotic Tentacle Reaches New Level of Squirminess | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A new developed approach to 3D printing has produced an octopus-inspired robotic device claimed to offer an unprecedented level of agility. Engineers crafted the artificial muscle using commercially available material and say it points to a future of advanced robotic devices inspired by nature.
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Biomimicry Global Design Challenge Down to Final Eight

Biomimicry Global Design Challenge Down to Final Eight | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The Biomimicry Institute has announced the finalists of the Global Design Challenge. Eight teams will now go on to prototype their solutions in an accelerator program that will award US$100,000 to the winner.
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Learning From Teeth And Seashells

Learning From Teeth And Seashells | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Teeth and seashells are tough and durable materials and are considered among the toughest that nature has to offer. Based on the super-strong properties, scientists have been looking at how these materials are structured in order to create tougher materials. New research has uncovered the secret to the inner strength of the materials: they are composed different layers within which numerous micro-platelets are joined together. These platelets are aligned in identical orientation within each layer. This structural complexity has proved difficult to replicate, at least until André Studart, who is the Professor of Complex Materials at ETH Zurich, began studying images at the molecular level."

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Underwater Fin Could Break Speed Record

Underwater Fin Could Break Speed Record | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Animal Dynamics, a company formed of biomechanics from the University of Oxford’s Department of Zoology, islooking to break the human-powered water speed record in a canoe propelled by an underwater fin, mimicking the way that dolphins or whales swim. The team believes that a flapping fin design could be a more efficient than a traditional propeller mechanism, as it works with the natural flow of water, rather than against it. Instead of using paddles, the catamaran-style canoe has a hydrofoil under its bow which is operated by a driver using a pedaling system. The cycling motion drives a fin downwards through the water, creating the thrust to propel the canoe forwards."

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Beetle Biomimicry

Beetle Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Water Factory imitates the catchment method used by the Namib desert beetle. The transparent plastic film in the upper part of the water factory has two different types of hydrophilic textures on its surface to increase the contact area between the air and the film. With the combination of two types of textures and air convection generated by a solar fan, moisture in the air condenses into drops at the convex hydrophilic endpoint and is finally gathered in the inner and outer walls of water collectors through hydrophobic groove."

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Swans Help Create Smoother Camera Drone Videos

Swans Help Create Smoother Camera Drone Videos | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The next time you see a graceful, dramatic video shot by a camera drone, you may have a swan to thank for the absence of any jittery footage. Stanford University researchers aredeveloping camera suspension technology inspired by whooping swans, whose heads remain remarkably still even when they're making aggressive in-flight maneuvers. Thanks to a blend of high-speed video and computer modeling, the scientists discovered that the swan's neck acts much like a vehicle's suspension, passively countering the effects of flapping wings or headwinds."

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