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Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
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Tiny Muscles Help Bats Fine-tune Flight

Tiny Muscles Help Bats Fine-tune Flight | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Bats appear to use a network of hair-thin muscles in their wing skin to control the stiffness and shape of their wings as they fly, according to a new study. The finding provides new insight about the aerodynamic fine-tuning of membrane wings, both natural and man-made.
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Rise Of The Insect Drones

Rise Of The Insect Drones | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Nature spent millions of years perfecting flapping-wing flight. Now engineers can reproduce it with machines.
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How Insects’ Wings Help Engineers…

How Insects’ Wings Help Engineers… | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Insects are one of the most successful groups of animals…so what can we learn from them? Examining how insects' wings and legs wear out over time may help engineers as they search for ways to make safe, more durable types of material.

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Owls' Ability to Fly in Acoustic Stealth Provides Clues to Mitigating Conventional Aircraft Noise

Owls have the uncanny ability to fly silently, relying on specialized plumage to reduce noise so they can hunt in acoustic stealth. Researchers from the University of Cambridge, England, are studying the owl's wing structure to better understand how it mitigates noise so they can apply that information to the design of conventional aircraft.

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Albatross's Effortless Flight Decoded—May Influence Future Planes

Albatross's Effortless Flight Decoded—May Influence Future Planes | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Aerospace engineers may have finally figured out how albatrosses go so far without flapping, and the findings could shape future planes.
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Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors

Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Imitating nature is not a new idea. When the GE team put Morpho wings under a powerful microscope, they saw a layer of tiny scales just tens of micrometers across. In turn, each of the scales had arrays of ridges a few hundred nanometers wide. This complex structure absorbs and bends light and givesMorfo butterflies their trademark shimmering blue and green coat."

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 6, 2:50 PM

Great ideas are often taken from nature! Check this one out!

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Airbus and Biomimicry: Nature Inspired Aviation

Airbus and Biomimicry: Nature Inspired Aviation | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"What do velvet, the skin of a shark, and advancements in aircraft aerodynamics have in common? The answer rests in a field of scientific study that involves examining what can be extracted, learned and duplicated from the natural world. Known as ‘biomimicry,” or biologically inspired engineering, this is the study and imitation of nature’s best ideas to help solve human challenges. A growing number of aeronautical innovations have been inspired by an array of natural structures, organs and materials – and these tried and tested patterns of the natural world will continue to be a powerful source of inspiration in the future." 

 

Photo details: Bald Eagle , Morris Valley Road, Harrison Mills, British ColumbiaCopyright © 2008, Alan D. Wilson. http://www.naturespicsonline.com

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Robotic Bat Wing Mimics a 'Spectacular Flyer'

Robotic Bat Wing Mimics a 'Spectacular Flyer' | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researcher Joseph Bahlman, a graduate student at Brown University, developed the robotic bat wing depicted in this video to help scientists better understand the workings of bat flight. "Bats are just really amazing, spectacular flyers," says Bahlman, a National Science Foundation graduate research fellow. "Their wings are extremely dynamic, so much more dynamic than birds or insects. If you look at the wings of a bat, they're just like our hands, they have all these joints that let their wings adapt into lots of different shapes, giving them a tremendous range of aerodynamic forces and maneuverabilities. They fly much better than anything we've engineered. I would love to figure out how that works and then duplicate it."

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Butterfly-Wing Wafers to Clad Iridescent Buildings

Butterfly-Wing Wafers to Clad Iridescent Buildings | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Now no one can say butterflies are all style and no substance. This might look like a pretty lily pad but it is actually a wafer created with lasers to mimic the iridescent colours of a butterfly's wings. For extra credit, Shu Yang at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, who led the project, also made the wafer water-repellent - another property of butterflies' wings, which helps them fly through rain.

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