Biomimicry
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Fish-eyed Lens Cuts Through the Dark

Fish-eyed Lens Cuts Through the Dark | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Combining the best features of a lobster and an African fish, engineers have created an artificial eye that can see in the dark. And their fishy false eyes could help search-and-rescue robots or surgical scopes make dim surroundings seem bright as day.
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Insect Eyes Enable Drones to Fly Independently

Insect Eyes Enable Drones to Fly Independently | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"After studying how insects navigate through dense vegetation, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have come up with a system that can be applied to flying robots. By adapting the system to drones, they can be made to adjust their speed to their surroundings and fly on their own- completely without human intervention and control. The breakthrough was made by vision researchers Emily Baird and Marie Dacke at the Department of Biology in Lund. Among other things, their research shows how bees that fly through dense forests assess light intensity to avoid other objects and find holes in the vegetation to enable them to navigate safely."

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Moths' Method Of Flying Through Dark May Help Engineers Build Tiny Flying Robots

Moths' Method Of Flying Through Dark May Help Engineers Build Tiny Flying Robots | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Hawkmoths are able see in the dark, and now, researchers know how they do it. This ability allows them to track the movements of flowers blowing in the wind, even at night, as the insects hover in the air.

Manduca sexta, roughly the size of a hummingbird, were studied by researchers using infrared cameras as they traveled between mechanical flowers. As the team varied light conditions, they also altered the speed at which the artificial flowers swayed from side to side. They then recorded how well the proboscis (feeding probe) of the insects stayed within the target flower. The moths are able to slow down their brains while seeking nectar, improving their eyesight under conditions of low visibility, the study found. While their minds are working on reduced speed, the creatures are also able to maintain rapid flapping of their wings and maintaining complex flight characteristics."

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Shrimp's Eyes Inspire New Cancer-detecting Camera

Shrimp's Eyes Inspire New Cancer-detecting Camera | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Shrimps' eyes have been revealed as the latest weapon against cancer, with their unique vision set to be adapted to diagnostic cameras. University of Queensland research has found the shrimps' compound eyes were able to detect polarised light, which could be mimicked to detect cancer cells."

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Insect-Eye Camera Offers Wide-Angle Vision for Tiny Drones

Insect-Eye Camera Offers Wide-Angle Vision for Tiny Drones | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Entomologists study insects known for their hard exoskeletons, jointed appendages, segmented bodies, bilateral symmetry and antennae. But perhaps the most impressive part of an insect is its lateral compound eyes. Scientists wishing to study insects have over 1 million species to select from!

Insect eyes are so impressive scientist and researcher John Rogers of the Science Research Group at Urbana-Champaign, University of Illinois, is designing miniature drones cameras based on their unique design. The big challenge for engineers is to build a drone camera with a 180° range of vision and clear vision throughout that line of sight. Insects have this ability when born."

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Sieg Holle's curator insight, January 3, 2014 9:30 AM

tech breakthrough?

 

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A Camera That Sees Like the Human Eye

"The retina is an enormously powerful tool. It sorts through massive amounts of data while operating on only a fraction of the power that a conventional digital camera and computer would require to do the same task. Now, engineers at a company called iniLabs in Switzerland are applying lessons from biology in an effort to build a more efficient digital camera inspired by the human retina."

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Nanostructures Modelled Like Moth Eyes May Boost Medical Imaging

Nanostructures Modelled Like Moth Eyes May Boost Medical Imaging | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Using the compound eyes of the humble moth as their inspiration, an international team of physicists has developed new nanoscale materials that could someday reduce the radiation dosages received by patients getting X-rayed, while improving the resolution of the resulting images.

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Biomimetics Used to Create Microlenses

Biomimetics Used to Create Microlenses | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Colloids have looked to nature to develop a relatively simple and inexpensive method of producing calcium carbonate lenses packed together in a regular arrangement. The researchers took inspiration from the brittle star (Ophiocoma wendtii), which is studded with tiny crystalline lenses made of calcium carbonate, that together form a type of compound eye."

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Bee Model Could Be Breakthrough for Autonomous Drone Development

Bee Model Could Be Breakthrough for Autonomous Drone Development | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Bees control their flight using the speed of motion (optic flow) of the visual world around them. A study by Scientists at the University of Sheffield Department of Computer Science suggests how motion-direction detecting circuits could be wired together to also detect motion-speed, which is crucial for controlling bees’ flight.

“Honeybees are excellent navigators and explorers, using vision extensively in these tasks, despite having a brain of only one million neurons,” said Alex Cope, PhD., lead researcher on the paper. “Understanding how bees avoid walls, and what information they can use to navigate, moves us closer to the development of efficient algorithms for navigation and routing, which would greatly enhance the performance of autonomous flying robotics,” he added.
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Scientists Tap Dragonfly Vision to Build a Better Bionic Eye

Scientists Tap Dragonfly Vision to Build a Better Bionic Eye | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers have developed an artificial-intelligence system based on a dragonfly’s vision that they say could aid the blind and help create a better driverless car. [...] In the latest research, published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, scientists showed how a computer program can mimic the eyesight of a dragonfly. Compared with humans, dragonflies have a limited ability to distinguish details and shapes of objects. But they are one of the insect kingdom’s best predators because their wide field of vision and ability to detect fast movements allow them to keep track of prey even among a swarm of insects."

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Display Design and the Human Vision System

Display Design and the Human Vision System | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"PenTile® technology is biomimetic, meaning it is designed to compliment the complex mechanics of the eye-brain system. As a simple example of eye mechanics consider how the eye utilizes the color blue. The eye has cone receptors that sense color and brightness, and discern patterns. These cones are sensitive to different wavelengths of color—primarily red, green, and blue. The blue cones detect mostly color (chroma) information, while the red and green cones do most of the work resolving images by discerning luminance, edges, and structural details of images, as well as contributing to color vision. The red and green cones are used independently, each cone seeing a "dot" of black and white—ignoring its color to produce high resolution luminance perception—and are used in opposition, comparing the amount of red versus green, to produce low resolution color perception.

 

The PenTile RGBW™ layout uses each red, green, blue and white subpixel to present high-resolution luminance information to the red and green cones, while using the combined effect of all the color subpixels to present lower-resolution chroma (color) information to all three cone types. Combined, this optimizes the match of display technology to the biological mechanisms of human vision."

 

Photo details: Brown eyes, 2007 by Alecgarci 149. Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons. 

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Study Offers Insights into Unique Color Vision of Mantis Shrimp

Study Offers Insights into Unique Color Vision of Mantis Shrimp | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"New research conducted by marine biologists reveals that the mantis shrimp Haptosquilla trispinosa uses a unique color vision system. [...] «Modern cameras struggle with the amount of data they take in due to increased pixel numbers. Maybe there is a more efficient way and the bio-inspiration provided by the shrimp could be the answer», Ms Thoen [lead author of study] concluded."

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Shape-changing Lens Blends Human and Insect Vision

Shape-changing Lens Blends Human and Insect Vision | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"One example of biomimicry that keeps popping up on the pages of Gizmag is the use of insect eyes as a model for innovative new optical devices. It seems that the potential for development in this area is far from exhausted with the announcement of another bug-inspired lens breakthrough from Ohio State University. This experimental lens developed by associate professor of biomedical engineering and ophthalmology, Yi Zhao, combines the wide angle properties of insect vision with the depth-of-field capabilities of a human eye."

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Human Eye Gives Researchers Visionary Design for New Lens Technology

Human Eye Gives Researchers  Visionary Design for New  Lens Technology | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Drawing heavily upon nature for inspiration, a team of researchers has created a new artificial lens that is nearly identical to the natural lens of the human eye. This innovative lens, which is made up of thousands of nanoscale polymer layers, may one day provide a more natural performance in implantable lenses to replace damaged or diseased human eye lenses, as well as consumer vision products; it also may lead to superior ground and aerial surveillance technology.

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Measuring Transient X-rays With Lobster Eyes

Measuring Transient X-rays With Lobster Eyes | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A technology that mimics the structure of a lobster's eyes is now being applied to a new instrument that could help revolutionize X-ray astronomy and keep astronauts safe on the International Space Station."

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Bird-Friendly Glass Designed With Help From Spiders

Bird-Friendly Glass Designed With Help From Spiders | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Arnold Glas has developed Ornilux, a spider-web inspired glass that reduces bird strikes into windows by an estimated 75 percent."

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