Biomimicry
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Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
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Bee-Inspired Algorithm Helps Delivery Companies Plan The Most Efficient Route

Bee-Inspired Algorithm Helps Delivery Companies Plan The Most Efficient Route | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"For a delivery truck making rounds, minor tweaks in a route can save huge amounts of time and gas. That's why UPS spent a decade and hundreds of millions of dollars building an algorithm to help calculate where trucks should turn. A startup called Routific designed an algorithm to help everyone else—like local flower delivery companies—also save fuel.  To help find the best routes, they took inspiration from bees. Their algorithm is based on the "bees algorithm," which describes how bees find the best route to flowers. Scout bees fly long distances in random directions, and if they find food, they fly back and buzz around in the so-called "waggle dance" to notify everyone else. When others go to the same location, they'll come back and waggle even harder if they find a better spot."



Photo details: Apis mellifera by Muhammad Mahdi Karim (www.micro2macro.net) Facebook Youtube), GFDL 1.2, via Wikimedia Commons

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A Nature-Inspired Scooter Reinvents The Cargo Bike So That It's Easier To Pedal

A Nature-Inspired Scooter Reinvents The Cargo Bike So That It's Easier To Pedal | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Mocan looks like a scooter, but has plenty of room to carry big items. [...]  Designed as part of the Biomimicry Student Design Challenge, which asks students to look for inspiration in nature, the Mocan imitates the squiggle movement of centipedes and snakes. Instead of pedaling, you move a handle back and forth to move quickly down the street."

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Walking the Talk: Bio-inspiration for Personal Transportation

Walking the Talk: Bio-inspiration for Personal Transportation | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Transportation can be divided into the mass transit, individual vehicle, and pedestrian categories. In previous posts I have written about the first two, in describing how bio-inspired design has improved trains and been instrumental in the development of autonomous vehicles. In this last of three themed columns in the “Getting There” series, I write about how nature might inspire a better pedestrian system.

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Biomimicry as applied to the Japanese Shinkansen train

Biomimicry as applied to the Japanese Shinkansen train | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Who would have guessed that the design of an electric passenger train had been influenced by animal biology?"

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Bubble Surfing Brings Savings

Bubble Surfing Brings Savings | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Penguins release streams of lubricating bubbles from their feathers to help them surge out of the sea. Now shipping engineers and operators are looking for similar ways to reduce friction between ships and sea water, with a system that releases air to create a carpet of bubbles along the bottom of the ship."

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9 Ways of Getting Around Inspired by Biomimicry

9 Ways of Getting Around Inspired by Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"[...] a number of designers and roboticists have already been looking at how the creatures of nature move. On the following slides, you'll find some ofthe ways nature's creativity is already being put to use."

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Traffic Signals Inspired by Bugs

Traffic Signals Inspired by Bugs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The way ants and termites navigate their own versions of gridlock inspires an algorithm that helps control human traffic on busy streets.
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