Biomimicry
64.8K views | +8 today
Follow
Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Learning From Teeth And Seashells

Learning From Teeth And Seashells | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Teeth and seashells are tough and durable materials and are considered among the toughest that nature has to offer. Based on the super-strong properties, scientists have been looking at how these materials are structured in order to create tougher materials. New research has uncovered the secret to the inner strength of the materials: they are composed different layers within which numerous micro-platelets are joined together. These platelets are aligned in identical orientation within each layer. This structural complexity has proved difficult to replicate, at least until André Studart, who is the Professor of Complex Materials at ETH Zurich, began studying images at the molecular level."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Synthetic Enamel Through Biomimetics

Synthetic Enamel Through Biomimetics | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Dentists, put away your drills - synthetic tooth enamel can seal tiny cavities without the pain, and with less damage to the patient's teeth."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Limpet Teeth Set New Strength Record

Limpet Teeth Set New Strength Record | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Engineers in the UK have found that limpets' teeth consist of the strongest biological material ever tested. Limpets use a tongue bristling with tiny teeth to scrape food off rocks and into their mouths, often swallowing particles of rock in the process. The teeth are made of a mineral-protein composite, which the researchers tested in tiny fragments in the laboratory.They found it was stronger than spider silk, as well as all but the very strongest of man-made materials.

The findings, published in the Royal Society's journal Interface, suggest that the secret to the material's strength is the thinness of its tightly packed mineral fibres - a discovery that could help improve the man-made composites used to build aircraft, cars and boats, as well as dental fillings."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Replicating Hardest Known Biomaterial Could Lead to Better Solar Cells and Batteries

Replicating Hardest Known Biomaterial Could Lead to Better Solar Cells and Batteries | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

A UCR researcher is taking inspiration from the teeth of a marine snail to build the technology that could lead to more efficient solar cells, fast-charging batteries and abrasion-resistant clothing.

more...
No comment yet.