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CoCoRo Underwater Mini-Robots School Like Fish and Share Knowledge

CoCoRo Underwater Mini-Robots School Like Fish and Share Knowledge | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The European Union CoCoRo research consortium has been developing three varieties of autonomous underwater robots that school together like fish. By doing so, the little bots can share and learn from each others' "knowledge" of their environment, acting as a collective cognitive system.
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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, June 11, 5:35 PM

*A partir de abril de 2011, la Unión Europea CoCoRo (Colectivo Cognitive Robots) consorcio de investigación ha desarrollado tres variedades de robots submarinos autónomos que hacen escuela juntos como peces. De esta manera, los pequeños robots pueden compartir y aprender de "conocimiento" cada otros de su entorno, actuando como un sistema cognitivo colectivo que es más inteligente que cualquiera de sus partes individuales.

Los robots se comunican entre sí a través de una función de intermitente LED, utilizando la electrónica de a bordo, como los sistemas de visión por ordenador, brújulas y acelerómetros para encontrar su camino alrededor de los ambientes acuáticos.

Utilizando un algoritmo inspirado en el comportamiento de la agrupación de las abejas (no pescados!), Pueden buscar a otros de su especie y luego asentarse juntos alrededor de una ubicación de la base central, tomando conciencia del  creciente tamaño de su grupo a medida que lleguen más robots. Entonces pueden dejar ese grupo para ir por sus propias misiones, posteriormente, volver a compartir sus hallazgos con el grupo.

En un experimento, grupos de dos tipos de los robots - "Jeff" robots y robots "Lirio" - se pusieron en una piscina para localizar un avión estrellado simulado (en realidad un grupo de imanes, que se utiliza para simular campo electro-magnético del avión) . Mientras que los robots Lily patrullaban la superficie, el Jeffs fue más profundo.

Una vez que uno de los robots Jeff situados los imanes, lo que solía sus LEDs para indicar la otra Jeffs, que respondió mediante la recopilación de alrededor de ella sobre el "restos". Los robots Lily observaron este comportamiento desde arriba, y respondieron formando un racimo en la superficie en la misma ubicación.

Los robots también se han probado en el océano abierto en Italia, donde, según informes, fueron capaces de agruparse y patrullar a pesar de las olas, las corrientes y el agua salada corrosiva.

Aunque el proyecto CoCoRo concluyó en septiembre pasado, los investigadores apenas están empezando a conocer los resultados. Se espera que la tecnología podría finalmente encontrar su camino en los robots acuáticos escolares autónomos utilizados para el monitoreo ecológico, reconocimiento, u otras aplicaciones.

 

Algunos de los robots puede verse en acción, en el vídeo a continuación.

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Swarms of Bees Inspired this Energy-saving Innovation

Swarms of Bees Inspired this Energy-saving Innovation | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"When it comes to managing a building’s cooling and heating costs, just look up. It turns out there’s a lot to be learned from the birds and the bees, according to Toronto-based REGEN Energy. The clean tech firm co-ordinates HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) systems by tapping into the ability of insect colonies and flocks of birds to display a greater collective intelligence."

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Eben Lenderking's curator insight, December 29, 2014 4:44 AM
En Ingles...Another reason to love bees and what the natural world can teach us...
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The Remarkable Self-organization of Ants

The Remarkable Self-organization of Ants | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Give a colony of garden ants a week and a pile of dirt, and they'll transform it into an underground edifice about the height of a skyscraper in an ant-scaled city. Without a blueprint or a leader, thousands of insects moving specks of dirt create a complex, spongelike structure with parallel levels connected by a network of tunnels. [...] Knowing the rules behind ant-made structures could help scientists understand how other complex systems emerge in nature."

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Sustainability as an Emergent Property: What Can We Learn from the Super-Organisms?

Sustainability as an Emergent Property: What Can We Learn from the Super-Organisms? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"In the ongoing drive to create and communicate about sustainability in the emerging economy, it can be useful to conceive of sustainability not as a quantifiable end goal, but as an emergent property.  [...] We could learn a thing or two from the collective creatures, the super-organisms, for whom emergence is no big deal —or whom sustainability is given, understood and inevitable."

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What Ant Colony Networks Can Tell Us About What’s Next for Digital Networks

What Ant Colony Networks Can Tell Us About What’s Next for Digital Networks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Ever notice how ant colonies so successfully explore and exploit resources in the world … to find food at 4th of July picnics, for example? You may find it annoying. But as an ecologist who studies ants and collective behavior, I think it’s intriguing — especially the fact that it’s all done without any central control. What’s especially remarkable: the close parallels between ant colonies’ networks and human-engineered ones. One example is “Anternet”, where we, a group of researchers at Stanford, found that the algorithm desert ants use to regulate foraging is like the Traffic Control Protocol (TCP) used to regulate data traffic on the internet. Both ant and human networks use positive feedback: either from acknowledgements that trigger the transmission of the next data packet, or from food-laden returning foragers that trigger the exit of another outgoing forager."

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How the Science of Swarms Can Help Us Fight Cancer and Predict the Future

How the Science of Swarms Can Help Us Fight Cancer and Predict the Future | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Thanks to new observation technologies, powerful software, and statistical methods, the mechanics of collectives are being revealed.
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Like a Fish Out of Water - Nissan's EPORO robot car concept

Like a Fish Out of Water - Nissan's EPORO robot car concept | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Nissan's EPORO robot car prototypes are programmed to think and act like a school of fish to avoid collision.
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Festo's Fantastical Insectoid Robots Include Bionic Ants and Butterflies

Festo's Fantastical Insectoid Robots Include Bionic Ants and Butterflies | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The German automation giant unleashes a swarm of new robotic insects. [...] The theme of Festo’s “Bionic Learning Network” program this year is “Join the Network,” and their flagship projects are both based around swarms of small robots that mimic the way insects work together and interact with each other."

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Waggl, Inspired by Honeybees to Help People Make Decisions, Secures $1M

Waggl, Inspired by Honeybees to Help People Make Decisions, Secures $1M | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Michael Papay, chief executive at Bay Area startup Waggl, said his app is inspired by (and named after) the decision making dance that honeybees have used for millions of years.”

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Lance LeTellier's curator insight, May 6, 2014 8:49 AM
Wow, that's crazy!
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Termite-like Robots Can Construct Buildings wWith no Central Leader

Termite-like Robots Can Construct Buildings wWith no Central Leader | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Insects don’t have the capacity to reason, and yet some are capable of building complex structures and executing complex foraging expeditions with no central organizing. That’s why researchers recently sent ants to the International Space Station and will observe how the change in gravity affects the ants’ ability to organize. At Harvard, scientists are taking their inspiration from termites, which can spend generations building mounds that stretch multiple feet into the air. On Thursday, a research team revealed a crew of iPad-sized robots that can build structures with no input from a central leader."

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Why Organizations Should Embrace Randomness Like Ant Colonies

Why Organizations Should Embrace Randomness Like Ant Colonies | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Consider the common ant. Each one is by genetic design capable of only a few simple behaviors and binary choices, making it a pretty dumb, rigid, inflexible being. Yet the collective behavior of an ant colony is adaptive, flexible and even creative; it’s a highly structured social organization. Now consider your average human. Most of us are individually adaptive, flexible and very creative. Yet the large organizations in which we work are often inflexible and incapable of adaptation and true innovation. Why are ant colonies so much better than the sum of their parts, while governments and companies are so often much worse?"

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Swarming Robots Could be the Servants of the Future

Swarming Robots Could be the Servants of the Future | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers in the Sheffield Centre for Robotics, jointly established by the University of Sheffield and Sheffield Hallam University, have been working to program a group of 40 robots, and say the ability to control robot swarms could prove hugely beneficial in a range of contexts, from military to medical."

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Successful Trial Accomplished with UAV Swarm Technology

Successful Trial Accomplished with UAV Swarm Technology | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

A small fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles was successfully controlled by a US warfighter supplemented with a military radio and a laptop. Earlier in 2012, flight trials were carried out in Oregon, during which a single source directed the Boeing ScanEagle UAVs. These tests will foster hovering of UAVs swarms over the battlefield in future, through which relevant tactical data can be acquired more rapidly and efficiently.

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Swarming and Transporting

Swarming and Transporting | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"At the Fraunhofer Institute for Material Flow and Logistics IML in Dortmund, Germany, researchers are working to harness swarm intelligence as a means of improving the flow of materials and goods in the warehouse environment."

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