Biomimicry
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NASA Is Considering The Use Of Soft Robotic Squids To Explore Europa

NASA Is Considering The Use Of Soft Robotic Squids To Explore Europa | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"NASA has chosen its next batch of proposals under its advanced concepts program, including the use of soft-robotic rovers for exploring gas-giant moons, and autonomous robots capable of crawling, hopping, and rolling around the surface of the Moon. [...] One of the more interesting proposals calls for a soft robotic squid/eel hybrid. The device would be equipped with a short antenna on its back to draw power from changing magnetic fields. The aquatic rover could be used to explore the subsurface oceans on Europa and Enceladus."

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Biomimicry Inspires Squid-like Building - Green Building Elements

Biomimicry Inspires Squid-like Building - Green Building Elements | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The Biotic-Tech Skyscraper City uses biomimicry and is inspired by squid, using transparency, flexibility, movement and protective pigmentation.
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How Squid and Octopus Might Point the Way to Nanotechnology-based Stealth Coatings

How Squid and Octopus Might Point the Way to Nanotechnology-based Stealth Coatings | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"For a long time, scientists have been fascinated by the dramatic changes in color used by marine creatures like squids and octopuses, but they never quite understood the mechanism responsible for this. Only recently they found out that a neurotransmitter, acetylcholine, sets in motion a cascade of events that culminate in the addition of phosphate groups to a family of unique proteins called reflectins. This process allows the proteins to condense, driving the animal's color-changing process. The latest findings revealed that there is a nanoscale mechanism behind cephalopods' ability to change color."

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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, August 13, 2013 6:40 AM

Watch this amazing video of a camouflaging octopus

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A Blueprint for Reversible Wrinkling in Composite Materials

A Blueprint for Reversible Wrinkling in Composite Materials | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A new model gives scientists guidelines to develop ‘smart’ composite materials with wrinkled microstructures.
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Squishy Robots Change Color, Glow

Squishy Robots Change Color, Glow | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A squishy robot inspired by the octopus and squid can change color and even glow in the dark.
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Squid-skin Displays Bring Us Closer to Biotech Camouflage

Squid-skin Displays Bring Us Closer to Biotech Camouflage | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Cephalopods are curious creatures, able to flex their bodies into nifty shapes and camouflage themselves from sight. Unsurprisingly, they have also been inspiring biomimicry-led designs for years because of this. This month a paper to be published in Nature Communications deals with their flexi-strechy skills and describes how man can now engineer an elastic film that lights up when stimulated using electricity. Meanwhile, a team of US material scientists has opted to create a new method of colour display using a technique they say will get us that much closer to the holy grail of cephalopod biomimicry studies: camouflaging "squid skin" that morphs into background shades automatically, (otherwise known as a metamaterial)."

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Dinner Plate Squid used to Develop Color-changing Camouflage

Dinner Plate Squid used to Develop Color-changing Camouflage | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Pencil squid have long proven useful to humans, mostly in the form of fried calamari on dinner plates, but a novel use for the creature has been discovered by researchers at University of California, Irvine, who have developed a camouflage coating from a protein in the everyday squid."

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Octopuses Inspire 3D-printed Propulsion Systems for Boats

Octopuses Inspire 3D-printed Propulsion Systems for Boats | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Octopuses and squid are amazing animals. Their unique attributes have already inspired invisibility cloak technology and more comfortable medical implants. Now, their ability to flee quickly from predators has inspired a new propulsion system for boats and other water craft."

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Material for Implants Mimics Squid Beaks

Material for Implants Mimics Squid Beaks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Many medical implants require hard materials that have to connect to or pass through soft body tissue, a mechanical mismatch that can lead to problems including a breakdown of the skin from abdominal feeding tubes or where wires pass through the chest to power heart pumps. Enter the squid.

The tip of a squid’s beak is harder than human teeth, but the base is as soft as the animal’s Jell-O-like body. In order to connect the two, a major part of the beak has a mechanical gradient that acts as a shock absorber so the animal can bite a fish with bone-crushing force, yet suffer no wear and tear on its fleshy mouth."

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