Biomimicry
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Insects are Helping us Develop the Future of Hearing Aids

Insects are Helping us Develop the Future of Hearing Aids | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Spend a summer in the countryside in a warm climate and you’ll likely hear crickets chirping, males of the species “singing” in an attempt to attract a female. What’s surprising is how small the creatures are given the very high sound levels they produce. Could studying crickets allow us to learn something about how to design a small speaker that is also loud, just as you need for a hearing aid?"

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Ecologist Develops Elephant-inspired Hearing Aid

Ecologist Develops Elephant-inspired Hearing Aid | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"American ecologist and hearing specialist Caitlin O'Connell-Rodwell is developing a new hearing aid inspired by elephants. Along with sound, elephants pick up ground-based vibrations, as the skin of their feet and trunks contains mechanoreceptors that can sense them. [...] She has partnered with HNU Photonics, a research company based on Maui, Hawaii, to develop a patch that adheres to the skin; this transduces sound into vibrations, which the braininterprets as a kind of Braille or Morse code."

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Super Fly Hearing Powers Captured in Miniature Microphone

Super Fly Hearing Powers Captured in Miniature Microphone | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A new microphone based on a fly's ear could spur the next big improvement in the acoustical performance of hearing aids, as well as inspire better instruments wherever optimizing directional noise capture to improve signal to noise ratio matters."

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Bat Biosonar Biomimicry for Improved Sonar Technology

Comparable to some other animals on our planet, bats use other methods instead sight in order to navigate or hunt. They are able to “see” in the dark by sending out sound waves that bounce back to the bats’ ears from objects such as fruit on trees and flying insect prey. The echolocation or biosonar is currently a simpler way for robots to perceive shapes than pattern recognition programs and is much more applicable in areas without the needed light.
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Wind Turbines With Owl Wings Could Silently Make Extra Energy

Wind Turbines With Owl Wings Could Silently Make Extra Energy | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Moving silently through the air is not just for the birds. Wind farms inspired by the stealthy flight of owls could generate more energy without annoying those who live nearby, say researchers."

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Altin Pevqeli's curator insight, September 14, 2015 10:26 PM

If they did make turbines inspired by the flight of owls which is silent, it would be a tremendous job. It would solve one of the biggest problems of turbine which is noise. If there isn't much noise people wouldn't mind them, making it so people could build more in areas.

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A Voice Processor as Smart as the Human Ear

A Voice Processor as Smart as the Human Ear | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

The human  auditory system is remarkable for its ability to interpret sounds, isolate  those of interest and block out the rest, allowing us to hear in the busy world  around us. Working like the human ear, [...] earSmart™ Advanced Voice processors make mobile devices acutely aware of their surroundings.

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