Biomimicry
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Nature inspired innovation
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The Jelly Inside a Shark's Nose is More Electrically Sensitive Than Any Man Made Material on Earth

The Jelly Inside a Shark's Nose is More Electrically Sensitive Than Any Man Made Material on Earth | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A biological material that has existed for millions of years may find new applications in modern electronics. A team of scientists from UC Santa Cruz, the University of Washington, and the Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason discovered that shark “jelly” is the highest proton conductive biological substance ever found, according to GizMag. In plain English, that means the material is extremely good at detecting weak electrical signals from great distances away — something that scientists and engineers believe could be useful in future sensor design.
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Spider-inspired Sensor Can Detect Human Speech and Pulse

Spider-inspired Sensor Can Detect Human Speech and Pulse | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The wandering spider boasts one of the world’s most sensitive vibration detectors: It can pick up the slightest rustling of a leaf from several meters away. Now, scientists have developed similar sensors that can detect simple human speech. The technology could lead to wearable electronics for speech recognition, health monitoring, and more."

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Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors

Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Imitating nature is not a new idea. When the GE team put Morpho wings under a powerful microscope, they saw a layer of tiny scales just tens of micrometers across. In turn, each of the scales had arrays of ridges a few hundred nanometers wide. This complex structure absorbs and bends light and givesMorfo butterflies their trademark shimmering blue and green coat."

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 6, 2014 5:50 PM

Great ideas are often taken from nature! Check this one out!

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Crickethair Sensor is 'Highlight' of Bio-Inspired Technology

Crickethair Sensor is 'Highlight' of Bio-Inspired Technology | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"One of the top ten highlights of the past year, in terms of technology that is inspired by nature. That was how the journal Bioinspiration & Biomimetics described a paper by researchers from the University of Twente's MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology. The publication describes new technology involving the use of sensors to measure flow patterns. Source of inspiration: the hairs on cricket abdomens."

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Shrew's Whiskers Get Robotic Touch

Shrew's Whiskers Get Robotic Touch | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

There are bionic eyes, ears and even noses and robots can see and hear even better than humans. But a sense of touch is still a challenge. So a group of European researchers turned to whiskers for inspiration. Humans can sense quite a bit with their fingertips, but animals like cats and mice use whiskers as a touch sensor. One reason for looking to whiskers (otherwise known as vibrissae) is that they're more durable than skin-like sensors placed on robotic fingers, which get a lot of wear and tear. Whiskers are also good for dark places where a camera might not be able to see.

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Silkmoth Inspires Novel Explosive Detector

Silkmoth Inspires Novel Explosive Detector | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Imitating the antennas of the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, to design a system for detecting explosives with unparalleled performance is the feat achieved by a French research team.
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Robotic Sensor Inspired by Animal Whiskers Developed to Measure Fluid Flow

Robotic Sensor Inspired by Animal Whiskers Developed to Measure Fluid Flow | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Many mammals, including seals and rats, rely on their whiskers to sense their way through dark environments. Inspired by these animals, scientists working at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Illinois' Advanced Digital Sciences Centre in Singapore have developed a robotic 'whisker' tactile sensor array designed to produce tomographic images by measuring fluid flow."

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Fruit Flies Could Sniff Out Bombs, Drugs

Fruit Flies Could Sniff Out Bombs, Drugs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A fruit fly's sense of smell could potentially be used to sniff out bombs and drugs, according to a new study. Fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) can detect smells such as those from wine, which the insects are naturally attracted to because it smells like their favorite food, fermenting fruit. Now, new research shows that their keen "noses" could with just as much accuracy identify odors from illicit drugs and explosive substances as well."

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E-Whiskers Have Arrived to Fulfill All Your Robot Cat Dreams

E-Whiskers Have Arrived to Fulfill All Your Robot Cat Dreams | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Sensitive electronic whiskers pave the way for increased interaction between robots and their external environments.
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A Blind Fish Inspires New Eyes And Ears For Subs

A Blind Fish Inspires New Eyes And Ears For Subs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

The blind cavefish has a problem. In the absolute blackness where it lives, no light illuminates its world. Yet the small fish has traded its eyesight for a different way to perceive its environment: "touch at a distance."

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Electronic Sensor Rivals Sensitivity of Human Skin

Electronic Sensor Rivals Sensitivity of Human Skin | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Devices inspired by beetle wings could give robots a more nuanced sense of touch.
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