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Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
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Squid-skin Displays Bring Us Closer to Biotech Camouflage

Squid-skin Displays Bring Us Closer to Biotech Camouflage | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Cephalopods are curious creatures, able to flex their bodies into nifty shapes and camouflage themselves from sight. Unsurprisingly, they have also been inspiring biomimicry-led designs for years because of this. This month a paper to be published in Nature Communications deals with their flexi-strechy skills and describes how man can now engineer an elastic film that lights up when stimulated using electricity. Meanwhile, a team of US material scientists has opted to create a new method of colour display using a technique they say will get us that much closer to the holy grail of cephalopod biomimicry studies: camouflaging "squid skin" that morphs into background shades automatically, (otherwise known as a metamaterial)."

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Speedo's New Nemesis Fins are Making Waves

Speedo's New Nemesis Fins are Making Waves | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Speedo’s cutting edge new Nemesis Fins are making waves in the swimming world. The most comfortable fitness and swim training fin on the market, Speedo’s new Nemesis Fin was designed using biomimicry and inspired by the pectoral fin of the Humpback Whale. The scalloped outer edge of the fins, like that of the Humpback Whale, creates greater surface area for water to pass over versus a smooth, straight edge. This technology creates enhanced propulsion, allowing the swimmer to push more water during kicking drills and training sets."

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Sharks Have Tough Skin Worthy of Biomimicry

Sharks Have Tough Skin Worthy of Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Sharks have tough skin that is worthy of biomimicry by nanotechnology designers and engineers. New coatings, textiles and other technologies that mimic the special biological properties of shark skin have been developed in recent years and many more such innovations are emerging across multiple industries."

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What Investors Can Learn From Sea Slugs

What Investors Can Learn From Sea Slugs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"We all know that crystal clear feeling that comes after a spell of unplugged time, especially if that time is spent outdoors.  For over 20 years as a professional investor, I've relished these small windows of escape, and my work has benefitted from the clarity that they bring.  More recently I've wondered, what if that clarity could last longer than my sunburn does?  What if instead of being a place to escape, nature could become my personal and professional mentor?"

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Oyster Shell May Inspire ‘Natural Exoskeleton’ Armor

Oyster Shell May Inspire ‘Natural Exoskeleton’ Armor | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

""We often think of seashells as being defined by their delicate beauty. But what if they also hold the secret to producing near-impenetrable human body armor? Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology say the structure of a certain oyster shell could inspire extremely tough and lightweight exoskeletons..."

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Robot Razor Clams Make Better Anchors

Robot Razor Clams Make Better Anchors | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"At MIT, nature has long been a source of inspiration, and in a new project two researchers turn to the razor clam as inspiration for their burrowing robot. The burrowing bot, know as the RoboClam, is about half the size of a lighter but is controlled by an off board set of apparatuses, including pressure regulators, pistons and other control mechanisms."

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Study Offers Insights into Unique Color Vision of Mantis Shrimp

Study Offers Insights into Unique Color Vision of Mantis Shrimp | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"New research conducted by marine biologists reveals that the mantis shrimp Haptosquilla trispinosa uses a unique color vision system. [...] «Modern cameras struggle with the amount of data they take in due to increased pixel numbers. Maybe there is a more efficient way and the bio-inspiration provided by the shrimp could be the answer», Ms Thoen [lead author of study] concluded."

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One Day We'll Fix Everything With Glues Copied From Mussels, Oysters, And Barnacles

One Day We'll Fix Everything With Glues Copied From Mussels, Oysters, And Barnacles | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A researcher has figured out a way to take the power of natural glues and make non-toxic and incredibly strong synthetic adhesives. It could help do everything from securing broken bones to manufacturing cars."

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3D-Printed Fish Scales May Improve Military Armor

3D-Printed Fish Scales May Improve Military Armor | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Human body armor has come a long way since the steel-plated suits of the Middle Ages, but protective animal structures — such as some shells and scales — still beat the most sophisticated man-made gear in terms of mobility and rigidity. Researchers at MIT are now using3D printing to bring humans up to speed with their animal kin by studying some of the sturdiest forms of animal armor, particularly fish scales, to design gear that matches the flexibility, comfort and durability found in the natural world."

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Scientists study 'fishy' behavior to solve an animal locomotion mystery (w/ Video)

Scientists study 'fishy' behavior to solve an animal locomotion mystery (w/ Video) | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A quirk of nature has long baffled biologists: Why do animals push in directions that don't point toward their goal, like the side-to-side sashaying of a running lizard or cockroach? An engineer building a robot would likely avoid these movements because they seem wasteful. So why do animals behave this way?

A multi-institutional research team, led by Johns Hopkins engineers, says it has solved this puzzle. In an article published in the Nov. 4-8 online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team reported that these extra forces are not wasteful after all: They allow animals to increase both stability and maneuverability, a feat that is often described as impossible in engineering textbooks."

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The Biomimicry Manual: How Does Nature Make Saltwater Drinkable?

The Biomimicry Manual: How Does Nature Make Saltwater Drinkable? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A billion people don't have enough drinking water. Desalinating oceans is economically and environmentally expensive. Biomimicry looks at how nature does it.
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'Invisibility Wetsuit' to Protect Against Sharks Launched in Western Australia

'Invisibility Wetsuit' to Protect Against Sharks Launched in Western Australia | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Suits are designed to mimic nature, some camouflaging swimmers, others warning sharks to stay away
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Sharklet: A Biotech Startup Fights Germs With Sharks

Sharklet: A Biotech Startup Fights Germs With Sharks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Forget chemicals or pills in the fight against nasty bacterial infections. Entrepreneur Mark Spiecker is betting that the secrte lies with sharks. Those fast and carnivorous fish just happen to have microscopic textures on their skin that make them highly resistant to barnacles, algae and, surprisingly, most human bacteria."

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Sea Creatures Inspire Bottle Design

Sea Creatures Inspire Bottle Design | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Inspired by diatoms and radiolarians, a new bottle used biomimicry as a basis for its new design. [...] Carlos Rego, a designer with Logoplaste Innovation Lab in Portugal, has found functional patterns in nature that have added beauty to his designs for something as utilitarian as a bottle. Those same patterns added strength while decreasing weight — and therefore material — from those bottles. And recently, the organisms that inspired the company’s latest design may also benefit from it. This story is about learning from nature how to minimize materials while still providing needed strength, how to cooperate, and how to design to make products that are not just less harmful to life, but are also restorative."

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The Car Designer Who Turned a Sailfish Into a Supercar

The Car Designer Who Turned a Sailfish Into a Supercar | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The sailfish can swim faster than a cheetah can run – and the secrets behind its speed inspired McLaren’s Frank Stephenson to create a new car.
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Camouflage Sheet Inspired by Octopus

Camouflage Sheet Inspired by Octopus | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Based on the camouflage abilities of octopuses and cuttlefish, engineers in the US have built a flexible material that changes colour to match its surroundings. The new design features a grid of 1mm cells, containing a temperature-driven dye that switches colour on demand."

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Biomimicry Inspires Squid-like Building - Green Building Elements

Biomimicry Inspires Squid-like Building - Green Building Elements | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The Biotic-Tech Skyscraper City uses biomimicry and is inspired by squid, using transparency, flexibility, movement and protective pigmentation.
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Robot Octopus Shows Off New Sculls

Robot Octopus Shows Off New Sculls | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
"Octopi are pro swimmers, thanks (at least in part) to that octet of arms they've got going on. They've adopted a particular swimming gait called sculling, which works great for them, but until they start publishing scientific papers, we're missing out on all of their gait testing data. Roboticists have had to start from scratch, and along the way, they've experimented with some swimming gaits that we've never seen a real octopus try and pull off."
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Fish Robots Search for Pollution in the Waters

Fish Robots Search for Pollution in the Waters | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A number of robotic fish are going to be used in an experiment in the port of Gijon in Spain in order to evaluate how effectively and cost-efficiently they can detect water pollution. The carp-shaped robots are part of a three-year research project of Huosheng Hu and his robotics team at the School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, University of Essex. The robot fish could be used to inspect rivers, lakes and seas. The life-like creatures, which mimic the undulating movement of real fish, are 1.5 meters (5 feet) long and will be equipped with tiny chemical sensors. These sensors are used to find sources of potentially hazardous pollutants in the water, such as leaks from vessels in the port or underwater pipelines. When they recharge their batteries via a “charging hub” they will be able to transmit the information to the port’s control center. This will enable the authorities to map the source and scale of the pollution virtually in real time."

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Mollusc Shells Inspire Super-glass

Mollusc Shells Inspire Super-glass | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Engineers intrigued by the toughness of mollusc shells, which are composed of brittle minerals, have found inspiration in their structure to make glass 200 times stronger than a standard pane. Counter-intuitively, the glass is strengthened by introducing a network of microscopic cracks, according to a study published in the journal Nature Communications on Tuesday."

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Robot Turtle helps Underwater Archaeologists Inspect Shipwrecks

Robot Turtle helps Underwater Archaeologists Inspect Shipwrecks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The Robot Safari in London Science Museum will see the world premiere of the underwater robot U-CAT, a highly maneuverable robot turtle, designed to penetrate shipwrecks. U-CAT’s locomotion principle is similar to sea turtles. Independently driven four flippers make the robot highly maneuverable; it can swim forward and backward, up and down and turn on spot in all directions. Maneuverability is a desirable feature when inspecting confined spaces such as shipwrecks. The robot carries an onboard camera and the video footage can be later used to reconstruct the underwater site."

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Stingrays' Weird Swimming May Inspire New Submarine Designs

Stingrays' Weird Swimming May Inspire New Submarine Designs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Sometimes the answers to some of the most challenging problems with technology can be found in nature. Researchers hoping to design more agile and fuel-efficient submarines are taking cues from the unique and elegant way stingrays swim. Scientists at Harvard University and the University at Buffalo are studying how stingrays move, including the seemingly effortless way the fish's round and flattened bodies ripple through water. The new research could inspire the development of next-generation unmanned submarines for ocean exploration, clean-up efforts or rescue missions."

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Dolphins Inspire Rescue Radar Device

Dolphins Inspire Rescue Radar Device | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"British engineers said Wednesday they had taken inspiration from dolphins for a new type of radar device that could easily track miners trapped underground or skiers buried in an avalanche. The device, like dolphins, sends out two pulses in quick succession to allow for a targeted search for semiconductor devices, cancelling any background "noise"..."

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How the Blue Whale can teach us about fans, filters and biomimicry

How the Blue Whale can teach us about fans, filters and biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Whales are some of the most extreme creatures on Earth  The 115 foot, 150 foot ton Blue Whale, for instance, is the largest animal that ever lived. These magnificent creatures are social mammals, descended from an ancient land dweller that also gave rise to the hippopotamus family. Like hippos and humans, they are warm-blooded and air-breathing, and stay with their young, nursing them for an extended period of time. And like us, they maintain complex social networks. As you might imagine, the whale faces some special challenges doing all this in the ocean. As usual, where challenge is extreme, the solutions are efficient. So how can the Blue Whale inspire us today?

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Giant Crabster Robot to Explore Shipwrecks and Shallow Seas

Giant Crabster Robot to Explore Shipwrecks and Shallow Seas | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The Japanese spider crab is about to lose its title as the world's largest crustacean thanks to a new robot, the Crabster, developed in South Korea. For the past 2 years, researchers at the Korean Institute of Ocean Science and Technology (KIOST) have been working on a giant robot crab that is about the size and weight of a Smart car. This summer it will help scientists explore wrecks below the sea, weathering harsh tidal currents rushing over it at 1.5 m/s."

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