Biomimicry
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Mudskipper Robot Gives Us a Lesson in Locomotion

Mudskipper Robot Gives Us a Lesson in Locomotion | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The mudskipper is a fascinating animal, in that it's a fish that both swims in the water and crawls on the land. It's probably not unlike the prehistoric fishes that first ventured out of the ocean, hundreds of millions of years ago. Looking at it, you might think that its two pectoral fins do all the work when it's out of the water, while its tail just flaps around. By building a robotic version of the mudskipper, however, scientists have learned that its tail plays a crucial role while it's on the land – the finding could have implications for the design of walking robots.
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Researchers Develop Clog-Resistant Filtration System Inspired by 3D Printed Fish Mouths

Researchers Develop Clog-Resistant Filtration System Inspired by 3D Printed Fish Mouths | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Filters can be found all around us, from our cars to our coffee makers. But they have one universal quality: they get clogged eventually. But a 3D printed solution could be just around the corner, as the Professor of Biology and ichthyologist Laurie Sanderson from the College of William and Mary has a patent pending for a bio-inspired alternative. Learning from the mouth structure of filter-feeding fish (using 3D printed models), she has developed a new mechanism that prevents filter clogging by trapping particles in vortices in the fluids.
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This Little Seahorse Will Teach Us How To Build Better Robots

This Little Seahorse Will Teach Us How To Build Better Robots | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
It’s hip to be square if you’re a seahorse—or rather, it has certain adaptive advantages. Cylindrical tails may be much more popular in the animal kingdom, but the seahorse’s bizarre square-prism tail has far better mechanical properties.
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Diana Ries Sheldon's curator insight, July 9, 2015 8:28 AM

@exfirebabe @sebring-airport

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Cuttlefish's Shifting Colors Could Be Reproduced in 'Artificial Skin'

Cuttlefish's Shifting Colors Could Be Reproduced in 'Artificial Skin' | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The shifting colors on the skin of cuttlefish and other cephalopods could lead to bio-inspired camouflage and signalling, researchers say.
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CoCoRo Underwater Mini-Robots School Like Fish and Share Knowledge

CoCoRo Underwater Mini-Robots School Like Fish and Share Knowledge | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The European Union CoCoRo research consortium has been developing three varieties of autonomous underwater robots that school together like fish. By doing so, the little bots can share and learn from each others' "knowledge" of their environment, acting as a collective cognitive system.
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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, June 11, 2015 5:35 PM

*A partir de abril de 2011, la Unión Europea CoCoRo (Colectivo Cognitive Robots) consorcio de investigación ha desarrollado tres variedades de robots submarinos autónomos que hacen escuela juntos como peces. De esta manera, los pequeños robots pueden compartir y aprender de "conocimiento" cada otros de su entorno, actuando como un sistema cognitivo colectivo que es más inteligente que cualquiera de sus partes individuales.

Los robots se comunican entre sí a través de una función de intermitente LED, utilizando la electrónica de a bordo, como los sistemas de visión por ordenador, brújulas y acelerómetros para encontrar su camino alrededor de los ambientes acuáticos.

Utilizando un algoritmo inspirado en el comportamiento de la agrupación de las abejas (no pescados!), Pueden buscar a otros de su especie y luego asentarse juntos alrededor de una ubicación de la base central, tomando conciencia del  creciente tamaño de su grupo a medida que lleguen más robots. Entonces pueden dejar ese grupo para ir por sus propias misiones, posteriormente, volver a compartir sus hallazgos con el grupo.

En un experimento, grupos de dos tipos de los robots - "Jeff" robots y robots "Lirio" - se pusieron en una piscina para localizar un avión estrellado simulado (en realidad un grupo de imanes, que se utiliza para simular campo electro-magnético del avión) . Mientras que los robots Lily patrullaban la superficie, el Jeffs fue más profundo.

Una vez que uno de los robots Jeff situados los imanes, lo que solía sus LEDs para indicar la otra Jeffs, que respondió mediante la recopilación de alrededor de ella sobre el "restos". Los robots Lily observaron este comportamiento desde arriba, y respondieron formando un racimo en la superficie en la misma ubicación.

Los robots también se han probado en el océano abierto en Italia, donde, según informes, fueron capaces de agruparse y patrullar a pesar de las olas, las corrientes y el agua salada corrosiva.

Aunque el proyecto CoCoRo concluyó en septiembre pasado, los investigadores apenas están empezando a conocer los resultados. Se espera que la tecnología podría finalmente encontrar su camino en los robots acuáticos escolares autónomos utilizados para el monitoreo ecológico, reconocimiento, u otras aplicaciones.

 

Algunos de los robots puede verse en acción, en el vídeo a continuación.

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Glass Sponges Hold Internal Secrets to Structural Strength

Glass Sponges Hold Internal Secrets to Structural Strength | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Scientists often look to biology for inspiration and innovation, emulating the way that nature builds to advance human engineering. Creatures of the ocean's depths are some of the most mysterious and fascinating subjects for study, due to the challenges of collecting them from very deep waters and for their unique adaptations for colonizing the sea floor. One such group is the hexactinellids, a collection of predominantly deep-sea sponges that produce elaborate skeletal systems of glass. Known as glass sponges, over the years their skeletal systems and their constituent elements (called spicules) have served as useful model systems for the design and fabrication of robust and damage tolerance."

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Limpet's Shell Could Inspire Next-gen Transparent Displays

Limpet's Shell Could Inspire Next-gen Transparent Displays | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"..an MIT/Harvard study suggests that a specific type of limpet's shell may hold the key to transparent displays that require no internal light source. The mollusk in question is the blue-rayed limpet which, as its name implies, has bright blue stripes on its translucent shell. It is believed that these are used to make potential predators mistake it for a poisonous snail, which also has blue markings. The iridescent lines appear blue due to the fact that the shell material in those areas reflects the blue spectrum of incoming light, while absorbing other colors so that they don't drown out the blue."

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Limpet Teeth Set New Strength Record

Limpet Teeth Set New Strength Record | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Engineers in the UK have found that limpets' teeth consist of the strongest biological material ever tested. Limpets use a tongue bristling with tiny teeth to scrape food off rocks and into their mouths, often swallowing particles of rock in the process. The teeth are made of a mineral-protein composite, which the researchers tested in tiny fragments in the laboratory.They found it was stronger than spider silk, as well as all but the very strongest of man-made materials.

The findings, published in the Royal Society's journal Interface, suggest that the secret to the material's strength is the thinness of its tightly packed mineral fibres - a discovery that could help improve the man-made composites used to build aircraft, cars and boats, as well as dental fillings."

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Underwater Vehicle Uses a Balloon to Dart Like an Octopus

Underwater Vehicle Uses a Balloon to Dart Like an Octopus | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"When you inflate a balloon and then release it without tying the valve shut, it certainly shoots away quickly. Octopi utilize the same basic principle, although they suck in and then rapidly expel water. An international team of scientists have now replicated that system in a soft-bodied miniature underwater vehicle, which could pave the way for very quickly-accelerating full-size submersibles."

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Octopus-Inspired Robot Enhanced With Webbing

Octopus-Inspired Robot Enhanced With Webbing | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Studying the movements of creatures in the natural world is very useful to robotics as the latest version of a robotic octopus from Greece shows. But real octopodes could also learn from their robotic cousin, which uses its octopus-inspired anatomy to propel itself in new ways.
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Sea Creatures Inspire Bottle Design

Sea Creatures Inspire Bottle Design | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Inspired by diatoms and radiolarians, a new bottle used biomimicry as a basis for its new design. [...] Carlos Rego, a designer with Logoplaste Innovation Lab in Portugal, has found functional patterns in nature that have added beauty to his designs for something as utilitarian as a bottle. Those same patterns added strength while decreasing weight — and therefore material — from those bottles. And recently, the organisms that inspired the company’s latest design may also benefit from it. This story is about learning from nature how to minimize materials while still providing needed strength, how to cooperate, and how to design to make products that are not just less harmful to life, but are also restorative."

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Vinicius Ferraz's curator insight, May 12, 2015 10:40 AM

pessoas se interessam pela relação natureza/inovação

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The Car Designer Who Turned a Sailfish Into a Supercar

The Car Designer Who Turned a Sailfish Into a Supercar | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The sailfish can swim faster than a cheetah can run – and the secrets behind its speed inspired McLaren’s Frank Stephenson to create a new car.
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Camouflage Sheet Inspired by Octopus

Camouflage Sheet Inspired by Octopus | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Based on the camouflage abilities of octopuses and cuttlefish, engineers in the US have built a flexible material that changes colour to match its surroundings. The new design features a grid of 1mm cells, containing a temperature-driven dye that switches colour on demand."

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The Jelly Inside a Shark's Nose is More Electrically Sensitive Than Any Man Made Material on Earth

The Jelly Inside a Shark's Nose is More Electrically Sensitive Than Any Man Made Material on Earth | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A biological material that has existed for millions of years may find new applications in modern electronics. A team of scientists from UC Santa Cruz, the University of Washington, and the Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason discovered that shark “jelly” is the highest proton conductive biological substance ever found, according to GizMag. In plain English, that means the material is extremely good at detecting weak electrical signals from great distances away — something that scientists and engineers believe could be useful in future sensor design.
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Underwater Fin Could Break Speed Record

Underwater Fin Could Break Speed Record | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Animal Dynamics, a company formed of biomechanics from the University of Oxford’s Department of Zoology, islooking to break the human-powered water speed record in a canoe propelled by an underwater fin, mimicking the way that dolphins or whales swim. The team believes that a flapping fin design could be a more efficient than a traditional propeller mechanism, as it works with the natural flow of water, rather than against it. Instead of using paddles, the catamaran-style canoe has a hydrofoil under its bow which is operated by a driver using a pedaling system. The cycling motion drives a fin downwards through the water, creating the thrust to propel the canoe forwards."

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Biomimicry Wave Energy Device Ready To Leave The Nest

Biomimicry Wave Energy Device Ready To Leave The Nest | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A new bio-inspired method of harvesting energy from the ocean has completed its shakedown on land, and now it’s finally ready for its first real test offshore. Called bioWAVE, the wave energy device won’t be venturing too far — Port Fairy in Australia is as far as it’s going — but we can hardly contain our excitement because we’ve been waiting 7 years for this moment."

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NASA Is Considering The Use Of Soft Robotic Squids To Explore Europa

NASA Is Considering The Use Of Soft Robotic Squids To Explore Europa | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"NASA has chosen its next batch of proposals under its advanced concepts program, including the use of soft-robotic rovers for exploring gas-giant moons, and autonomous robots capable of crawling, hopping, and rolling around the surface of the Moon. [...] One of the more interesting proposals calls for a soft robotic squid/eel hybrid. The device would be equipped with a short antenna on its back to draw power from changing magnetic fields. The aquatic rover could be used to explore the subsurface oceans on Europa and Enceladus."

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Robotic Arm Inspired by Octopus Tentacles Aimed at Helping Surgeons

Robotic Arm Inspired by Octopus Tentacles Aimed at Helping Surgeons | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Surgeries might be easier and safer due to a new invention by researchers from the Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies in Italy, a robotic arm that was inspired by tentacles of an octopus. 

The robotic arm device moves by using its inflatable chambers, imitating the natural motion of an octopus twisting and elongating its tentacles in any direction it desires."

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​In the Future, Your City Could Change Colors Like an Octopus

​In the Future, Your City Could Change Colors Like an Octopus | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Most of us were born and will die a certain color, but octopuses are masters of their hue, changing from transparent to shades of red, pink, purple and blue by stretching and relaxing their skin. If we could unlock their secret and wrap our buildings in octopus skin, then city skylines might shimmer a spectrum of colors and opacities as the sun waxed and waned."

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3D Printed Fish Scales Inspire Human Armor Development

3D Printed Fish Scales Inspire Human Armor Development | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Another incredible adaptive animal and insect feature is the development of protective scales that provide insulation, and serve as a camouflage to ward off predators. In fact, animal scale functioning is so impressive that recently “dermal modification” — or the adaptive properties of animal skins — has inspired the scientific development of human armor using 3D printing."

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Yves Bonis's curator insight, February 27, 2015 4:08 AM

Très inspirant... d'autant qu'on doit pouvoir en faire autre chose que des armures. Allons au-delà du simple fac simile des fonctions du vivant et je crois que nous pourrons nous inclure correctement dans l'avenir du monde.

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The Octopus and Bioinspiration

The Octopus and Bioinspiration | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Photo details: Octopus vulgaris, Comingio Merculiano, 1896. Wikimedia Commons, public domain.

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Octopus are an incredible source of inspiration. Check out the fantastic examples in this collection of scoops.

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Memo to Carmakers: This Fish Is a Bad Model

Memo to Carmakers: This Fish Is a Bad Model | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"In 2005, Mercedes-Benz revealed a concept car with a strange shape. Called the Bionic, the cartoonishly snub-nosed vehicle was modeled after Ostracion cubicus, the yellow boxfish. Car manufacturers aren’t the only ones to take inspiration from this weird coral dweller. But researchers now say engineers who mimicked the boxfish might have been misled."

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Squid-skin Displays Bring Us Closer to Biotech Camouflage

Squid-skin Displays Bring Us Closer to Biotech Camouflage | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Cephalopods are curious creatures, able to flex their bodies into nifty shapes and camouflage themselves from sight. Unsurprisingly, they have also been inspiring biomimicry-led designs for years because of this. This month a paper to be published in Nature Communications deals with their flexi-strechy skills and describes how man can now engineer an elastic film that lights up when stimulated using electricity. Meanwhile, a team of US material scientists has opted to create a new method of colour display using a technique they say will get us that much closer to the holy grail of cephalopod biomimicry studies: camouflaging "squid skin" that morphs into background shades automatically, (otherwise known as a metamaterial)."

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Speedo's New Nemesis Fins are Making Waves

Speedo's New Nemesis Fins are Making Waves | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Speedo’s cutting edge new Nemesis Fins are making waves in the swimming world. The most comfortable fitness and swim training fin on the market, Speedo’s new Nemesis Fin was designed using biomimicry and inspired by the pectoral fin of the Humpback Whale. The scalloped outer edge of the fins, like that of the Humpback Whale, creates greater surface area for water to pass over versus a smooth, straight edge. This technology creates enhanced propulsion, allowing the swimmer to push more water during kicking drills and training sets."

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Sharks Have Tough Skin Worthy of Biomimicry

Sharks Have Tough Skin Worthy of Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Sharks have tough skin that is worthy of biomimicry by nanotechnology designers and engineers. New coatings, textiles and other technologies that mimic the special biological properties of shark skin have been developed in recent years and many more such innovations are emerging across multiple industries."

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