Biomimicry
63.7K views | +28 today
Follow
Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Robotic Bee Drones Could Be The Future Of Agriculture

Robotic Bee Drones Could Be The Future Of Agriculture | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"This robotic bee drone prototype gives bees a hand in pollinating flowers and could be a solution to the dwindling bee population. [...] Part-awareness rising project, part-potential solution to a very real problem, Plan Bee is a self sustainable drone that stimulates the growth of plants by cross-pollination. The drone sucks pollen through tiny holes located underneath and then pushes it back out through the vents on top. As the drone flies over the field, the pollen will fall on the flowers nearby. The device is also equipped with a UV camera to locate the flowers."

more...
Renato P. dos Santos's curator insight, March 31, 9:03 AM
Not the 'Black Mirror' type, please. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5709236/
DroneFeed.io's curator insight, April 4, 1:22 AM

Something interesting

Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Mudskipper Robot Gives Us a Lesson in Locomotion

Mudskipper Robot Gives Us a Lesson in Locomotion | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The mudskipper is a fascinating animal, in that it's a fish that both swims in the water and crawls on the land. It's probably not unlike the prehistoric fishes that first ventured out of the ocean, hundreds of millions of years ago. Looking at it, you might think that its two pectoral fins do all the work when it's out of the water, while its tail just flaps around. By building a robotic version of the mudskipper, however, scientists have learned that its tail plays a crucial role while it's on the land – the finding could have implications for the design of walking robots.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Actuators Inspired by Muscle

Actuators Inspired by Muscle | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

To make robots more cooperative and have them perform tasks in close proximity to humans, they must be softer and safer. A new actuator developed by a team led by George Whitesides, Ph.D. - who is a Core Faculty member at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering [...] - generates movements similar to those of skeletal muscles using vacuum power to automate soft, rubber beams.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Insect Eyes Enable Drones to Fly Independently

Insect Eyes Enable Drones to Fly Independently | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"After studying how insects navigate through dense vegetation, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have come up with a system that can be applied to flying robots. By adapting the system to drones, they can be made to adjust their speed to their surroundings and fly on their own- completely without human intervention and control. The breakthrough was made by vision researchers Emily Baird and Marie Dacke at the Department of Biology in Lund. Among other things, their research shows how bees that fly through dense forests assess light intensity to avoid other objects and find holes in the vegetation to enable them to navigate safely."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Octopus-Inspired Robots Can Grasp, Crawl, and Swim

Octopus-Inspired Robots Can Grasp, Crawl, and Swim | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Most of today’s robots only function well in highly structured environments, like factory assembly lines. But thanks to some clever biomimicry, we might soon be seeing robots with a more flexible approach. To build their squishy aquatic robots, a team of researchers in Italy drew inspiration from the octopus. The animal’s movements don’t require a lot of brainpower. Rather than relying on top-down instructions from the central nervous system, many of an octopus’s movements happen almost spontaneously–the result of the physical interplay between the animal’s body and its surrounding environment. By utilizing this strategy, called embodied intelligence, the team created soft robots that could grasp objects, crawl along the seafloor, and even swim–with a lot less computing power than you might imagine.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Hairy Animals Teach Us How to Keep Robots Clean

Hairy Animals Teach Us How to Keep Robots Clean | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Drones and other autonomous vehicles, including Mars rovers, are susceptible to failure because of the accumulation of dirt and other airborne particles that interfere with electronics and sensors. Associate professor David Hu and his colleagues from Georgia Institute of Technology scrutinized more than two dozen studies and analyzed 27 animals to better understand how the critters kept clean. What the scientists found could improve the way sensitive electronics, robots, sensors and unmanned aerial vehicles are kept free of pollen and dirt."

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Robotic Sensor Inspired by Animal Whiskers Developed to Measure Fluid Flow

Robotic Sensor Inspired by Animal Whiskers Developed to Measure Fluid Flow | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Many mammals, including seals and rats, rely on their whiskers to sense their way through dark environments. Inspired by these animals, scientists working at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Illinois' Advanced Digital Sciences Centre in Singapore have developed a robotic 'whisker' tactile sensor array designed to produce tomographic images by measuring fluid flow."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

This Little Seahorse Will Teach Us How To Build Better Robots

This Little Seahorse Will Teach Us How To Build Better Robots | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
It’s hip to be square if you’re a seahorse—or rather, it has certain adaptive advantages. Cylindrical tails may be much more popular in the animal kingdom, but the seahorse’s bizarre square-prism tail has far better mechanical properties.
more...
Diana Ries Sheldon's curator insight, July 9, 2015 8:28 AM

@exfirebabe @sebring-airport

Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Moths' Method Of Flying Through Dark May Help Engineers Build Tiny Flying Robots

Moths' Method Of Flying Through Dark May Help Engineers Build Tiny Flying Robots | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Hawkmoths are able see in the dark, and now, researchers know how they do it. This ability allows them to track the movements of flowers blowing in the wind, even at night, as the insects hover in the air.

Manduca sexta, roughly the size of a hummingbird, were studied by researchers using infrared cameras as they traveled between mechanical flowers. As the team varied light conditions, they also altered the speed at which the artificial flowers swayed from side to side. They then recorded how well the proboscis (feeding probe) of the insects stayed within the target flower. The moths are able to slow down their brains while seeking nectar, improving their eyesight under conditions of low visibility, the study found. While their minds are working on reduced speed, the creatures are also able to maintain rapid flapping of their wings and maintaining complex flight characteristics."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

CoCoRo Underwater Mini-Robots School Like Fish and Share Knowledge

CoCoRo Underwater Mini-Robots School Like Fish and Share Knowledge | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The European Union CoCoRo research consortium has been developing three varieties of autonomous underwater robots that school together like fish. By doing so, the little bots can share and learn from each others' "knowledge" of their environment, acting as a collective cognitive system.
more...
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, June 11, 2015 5:35 PM

*A partir de abril de 2011, la Unión Europea CoCoRo (Colectivo Cognitive Robots) consorcio de investigación ha desarrollado tres variedades de robots submarinos autónomos que hacen escuela juntos como peces. De esta manera, los pequeños robots pueden compartir y aprender de "conocimiento" cada otros de su entorno, actuando como un sistema cognitivo colectivo que es más inteligente que cualquiera de sus partes individuales.

Los robots se comunican entre sí a través de una función de intermitente LED, utilizando la electrónica de a bordo, como los sistemas de visión por ordenador, brújulas y acelerómetros para encontrar su camino alrededor de los ambientes acuáticos.

Utilizando un algoritmo inspirado en el comportamiento de la agrupación de las abejas (no pescados!), Pueden buscar a otros de su especie y luego asentarse juntos alrededor de una ubicación de la base central, tomando conciencia del  creciente tamaño de su grupo a medida que lleguen más robots. Entonces pueden dejar ese grupo para ir por sus propias misiones, posteriormente, volver a compartir sus hallazgos con el grupo.

En un experimento, grupos de dos tipos de los robots - "Jeff" robots y robots "Lirio" - se pusieron en una piscina para localizar un avión estrellado simulado (en realidad un grupo de imanes, que se utiliza para simular campo electro-magnético del avión) . Mientras que los robots Lily patrullaban la superficie, el Jeffs fue más profundo.

Una vez que uno de los robots Jeff situados los imanes, lo que solía sus LEDs para indicar la otra Jeffs, que respondió mediante la recopilación de alrededor de ella sobre el "restos". Los robots Lily observaron este comportamiento desde arriba, y respondieron formando un racimo en la superficie en la misma ubicación.

Los robots también se han probado en el océano abierto en Italia, donde, según informes, fueron capaces de agruparse y patrullar a pesar de las olas, las corrientes y el agua salada corrosiva.

Aunque el proyecto CoCoRo concluyó en septiembre pasado, los investigadores apenas están empezando a conocer los resultados. Se espera que la tecnología podría finalmente encontrar su camino en los robots acuáticos escolares autónomos utilizados para el monitoreo ecológico, reconocimiento, u otras aplicaciones.

 

Algunos de los robots puede verse en acción, en el vídeo a continuación.

Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

A Robotic "Hand" Based on the Chameleon's Tongue

A Robotic "Hand" Based on the Chameleon's Tongue | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Mechanical robot grippers are designed to grasp specific shapes. This is perfect for assembly lines, where every object is the same. But what if a more flexible solution were required? Think of a conveyor belt covered with random junk that needed to be sorted for recycling:

Imagine a robot hand that needs to pick up a can, a glass dish, a plastic bottle cap, a paper clip, et cetera, all on the fly.

 

Enter the FlexShapeGripper, which eschews metal claws for a silicone bag filled with fluid [...] Fascinatingly, the FlexShapeGripper was inspired by a lizard: the chameleon is able to catch a variety of different insects by putting its tongue over the respective prey and securely enclosing it. The FlexShapeGripper uses this principle to grip the widest range of objects in a form-fitting manner. Using its elastic silicone cap, it can even pick up several objects in a single gripping process and put them down together, without the need for a manual conversion." 

Miguel Prazeres's insight:

Check out the accompanying video.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Underwater Vehicle Uses a Balloon to Dart Like an Octopus

Underwater Vehicle Uses a Balloon to Dart Like an Octopus | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"When you inflate a balloon and then release it without tying the valve shut, it certainly shoots away quickly. Octopi utilize the same basic principle, although they suck in and then rapidly expel water. An international team of scientists have now replicated that system in a soft-bodied miniature underwater vehicle, which could pave the way for very quickly-accelerating full-size submersibles."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Bio-inspired Autonomous Vehicles Expand Navy Littoral Capabilities

Bio-inspired Autonomous Vehicles Expand Navy Littoral Capabilities | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Researchers at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have taken inspiration from nature—from fish, in particular—to design and develop novel underwater propulsion, control, and sensing solutions for near-shore and littoral zone missions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Bat Bot is an Autonomous Drone That Mimics a Bat's Flight

Bat Bot is an Autonomous Drone That Mimics a Bat's Flight | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Robotic birds and winged insects are relatively easy to create, but with over 40 joints in their wings, bats offer a new level of intricacy. Or, as Caltech professor and Jet Propulsion Laboratory researcher Soon-Jo Chung put it during a press conference, "bat flight is the holy grail of aerial robotics. [...] By simplifying that wing structure into just nine key joints covered by a flexible membrane, however, the team successfully created the first Bat Bot. Built from carbon fiber bones and 3D-printed socket joints, Bat Bot weighs just 93 grams and the silicon-based wing membrane is only 56 microns thick with a roughly one-foot wingspan."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Robotic Stingray Powered by Light-Activated Muscle Cells

Robotic Stingray Powered by Light-Activated Muscle Cells | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Kevin Kit Parker wants to build a human heart. His young daughter loves the New England Aquarium in Boston. In this Science report, father’s and daughter’s obsessions have combined in an unlikely creation: a nickel-sized artificial stingray whose swimming is guided by light and powered by rat heart muscle cells. 
more...
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Bee Model Could Be Breakthrough for Autonomous Drone Development

Bee Model Could Be Breakthrough for Autonomous Drone Development | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Bees control their flight using the speed of motion (optic flow) of the visual world around them. A study by Scientists at the University of Sheffield Department of Computer Science suggests how motion-direction detecting circuits could be wired together to also detect motion-speed, which is crucial for controlling bees’ flight.

“Honeybees are excellent navigators and explorers, using vision extensively in these tasks, despite having a brain of only one million neurons,” said Alex Cope, PhD., lead researcher on the paper. “Understanding how bees avoid walls, and what information they can use to navigate, moves us closer to the development of efficient algorithms for navigation and routing, which would greatly enhance the performance of autonomous flying robotics,” he added.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

A Seahorse Tail Could Inspire Better Robots, Surgical Tools

A Seahorse Tail Could Inspire Better Robots, Surgical Tools | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
An advance in understanding why the seahorse’s tail is made of square plates could inform the next generation of robotics and armor. In an engineering study that looked at the mechanics of how the fish’s tail works, researchers found the structure’s shape is optimized to resist crushing and to grasp while bending and twisting.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Bacteria Have ‘Biological Wheels’ That We Can Finally See In 3D

Bacteria Have ‘Biological Wheels’ That We Can Finally See In 3D | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Among bacteria’s many attributes, perhaps one of its most overlooked yet important ones is its ability to propel itself via flagellum, a unique appendage hanging off its end. This mechanism is a perfect example of a naturally occurring, biological wheel. Aside from the beautiful novelty of these images, researchers could study them to develop better motors for nano-robots, or to design better antibiotics that target the flagellum specific to a certain bacteria.[...] Now, for the first time, scientists were able to take a high resolution, 3D look at these wheels at work, using an electron microscope."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

3D-Printed Robotic Tentacle Reaches New Level of Squirminess

3D-Printed Robotic Tentacle Reaches New Level of Squirminess | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A new developed approach to 3D printing has produced an octopus-inspired robotic device claimed to offer an unprecedented level of agility. Engineers crafted the artificial muscle using commercially available material and say it points to a future of advanced robotic devices inspired by nature.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Robot Can Leap From Water's Surface

Robot Can Leap From Water's Surface | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Scientists have developed a tiny robot - based on the water strider insect - that can jump on water. The robotic version uses the same forces to jump as the water strider - pushing off without breaking the surface. It takes off with a downward force that never exceeds the surface tension of water - the force that "glues" surface water molecules together."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Cockroach Robot Squeezes Through Cracks

Cockroach Robot Squeezes Through Cracks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"While researchers hope this robot won’t be crawling around your kitchen floor, they do think a new cockroach-inspired bot will be able to slip through tiny cracks to find people buried in the rubble of collapsed buildings. Dubbed “veloci-roach,” the crawling device uses sensors and locomotion like many other bio-inspired devices. But this one flips on its side to shimmy through spaces that would normally prove too small..."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

NASA Is Considering The Use Of Soft Robotic Squids To Explore Europa

NASA Is Considering The Use Of Soft Robotic Squids To Explore Europa | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"NASA has chosen its next batch of proposals under its advanced concepts program, including the use of soft-robotic rovers for exploring gas-giant moons, and autonomous robots capable of crawling, hopping, and rolling around the surface of the Moon. [...] One of the more interesting proposals calls for a soft robotic squid/eel hybrid. The device would be equipped with a short antenna on its back to draw power from changing magnetic fields. The aquatic rover could be used to explore the subsurface oceans on Europa and Enceladus."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Robotic Arm Inspired by Octopus Tentacles Aimed at Helping Surgeons

Robotic Arm Inspired by Octopus Tentacles Aimed at Helping Surgeons | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Surgeries might be easier and safer due to a new invention by researchers from the Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies in Italy, a robotic arm that was inspired by tentacles of an octopus. 

The robotic arm device moves by using its inflatable chambers, imitating the natural motion of an octopus twisting and elongating its tentacles in any direction it desires."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

A Drone With Bug Vision

A Drone With Bug Vision | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Almost anything that flies, be it a plane, a spacecraft, or a drone, has an inertial navigation system with accelerometers and gyroscopes that control yaw, pitch and roll, and thus the flight path. Flying insects like bees, however, don't have inertial systems to guide them; they rely exclusively on what they see. This has inspired two researchers at the Aix-Marseille University in France to build a drone that imitates the way these insects navigate. Their mission was to design it to fly and circumvent obstacles by relying solely on visual cues. "

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Really! Can Robots fly?

Really! Can Robots fly? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The new robot uses adaptive morphology inspired by the common vampire bat, Desmodus rotundus, meaning that the wings have been actuated using a foldable skeleton mechanism covered with a soft fabric such that they can be used both as wings and as legs (whegs).
more...
No comment yet.