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Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
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The Biological Basis of Resilient Cities

The Biological Basis of Resilient Cities | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Biological systems offer design strategies for successfully adapting to an age of climate change and resource depletion. Insights from nature will be essential in creating a green and sustainable future for humankind.
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Coastal Resilience Through Biomimicry

Coastal Resilience Through Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The resort town of Blackpool on the UK’s northeast coast is a classic example of what can go wrong when you work against natural coastline dynamics. It was built on a sand dune, which, as the town expanded, the Victorians replaced with a monumental 10-meter/30-foot-high seawall. This severed the town from its main asset, its beach, and as competition grew from continental European destinations, Blackpool fell into economic decline. To make matters worse, by the early 2000s the seawall was failing to hold back increasingly stormy winter seas, which began to flood the town. The solution has been to learn from the dunes. The high wall has been replaced with a gently sloping set of steps stretching the length of the town, mimicking the incline of sand dunes to dissipate wave energy.."

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To Become More Adaptable, Take a Lesson from Biology

To Become More Adaptable, Take a Lesson from Biology | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Even the best of us are horrible at predicting the future. That's too bad, because our world is full of risk that we'd love to avoid and opportunity that we'd love to seize. Fortunately, there's a rich source of lessons on how to thrive in an unpredictable world, and it has been cranking out success stories for 3.5 billion years. It's called biology."

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Structuring Biomimicry, Improving Building’s Resiliency

Structuring Biomimicry, Improving Building’s Resiliency | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Imitating nature has become a meaningful approach for contemporary architects and design futurists to the built environment, especially for those who foster a future that doesn’t compete with nature but coexist with it. At the light of recent natural disasters around the world, especially those geologically associated such as tsunamis and earthquakes, which have proven its destruction power over the current built environment; architects and structural engineers have found in biomimicry an ecological approach in order to improve future building’s disaster resilience

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Natural Allies for the Next Sandy

Natural Allies for the Next Sandy | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Nature’s own walls, like reefs and marshes, have appeal and provide many other benefits, but questions remain on how much protection they would provide, especially in a major storm.
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Monocultures, Biomimicry and Ethnography

Monocultures, Biomimicry and Ethnography | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Monocultures do not exist in nature because they are not sustainable.  Natural systems are resilient because of their diversity and redundancy, which allows them to maintain a healthy equilibrium. When there’s a change in the system (increase in population of deer), the system responds with a countermeasure (increase in number of predators), to ensure that equilibrium within the ecosystem is maintained.

 

 

Photo details: Marsh Reflections, Pyramid Mountain, Jasper National Park, Alberta, Copyright © 2009, Alan D. Wilson. http://www.naturespicsonline.com"

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Natural Security Nature & Adaptability: Solutions for an Uncertain World

Natural Security Nature & Adaptability: Solutions for an Uncertain World | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Much needed and welcome growth is occurring in the business of looking to nature for ideas and inspiration on how people can make society function better. Initially, these adoptions seemed to come in the form of “ah ha” moments, as when a burr stuck to an inventor’s clothes gave him the inspiration to create Velcro. More recently, “green design” has tried to more systematically incorporate nature’s ways of doing things into buildings, furniture and spaces. But the real power in learning from nature is not in copying its products to improve how people make products but in incorporating its processes to improve how people process the complex and ever changing world around them.

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