Biomimicry
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Newlight Technologies Produces AirCarbon Plastic From CO2

Newlight Technologies Produces AirCarbon Plastic From CO2 | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"In recent years, the desire to emulate botanical processes for environmental benefit has inspired "design similes," such as cities that behave like forests, buildings that act as trees, or products that operate like plants. Although such comparisons serve to promote ideal goals, they are difficult to put into actual practice. Irvine, Calif.-based Newlight Technologies has found a way to achieve the latter objective, with a plastic that is made by mimicking the material production method of plants. AirCarbon is a type of polyester that is made from air rather than oil. Like plants, Newlight's "GHG-to-Plastic" process captures CO2 from the air, and isolates the carbon and oxygen elements. The company then polymerizes C and O and reassembles them into a long-chain thermopolymer. The resulting plastic is biodegradable, recyclable in multiple stages, and has programmable compostability."

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How Does Nature Make Materials?

How Does Nature Make Materials? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

How does nature make materials?Let Biomimicry 3.8 Institute's Director of Youth Education Sam Stier give you some insight into nature's premier polymer producer. Check AskNature Nugget Ep. 8: Plants and Plastic.

 

Photo details: Mountain Fireweed, Bow Pass Summit, Banff National Park, Alberta. Copyright © 2009, Alan D. Wilson. http://www.naturespicsonline.com

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Biomimetics: Smart Geometry at Work

Biomimetics: Smart Geometry at Work | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"[...] Compared to many engineering materials, the substances/materials of biology do not have any especially outstanding characteristic. They are successful not so much because of what they are but because of the way in which they are put together. The bulk of mechanical loads in biology are carried by polymer fibres such as cellulose (plants), collagen (animals), chitin (insects, crustaceans) and silks (spiders's webs). The fibres are bonded together by various substances (polysaccharrides, polyphenols, etc.), sometimes in combination with minerals such as calcium carbonate (mollusk shells) and hydroxyapatite (bone). Their geometrical organization and the degree of interaction between them provide the means of tailoring properties for specific requirements, meeting the necessary functional performance."

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