Biomimicry
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Nature inspired innovation
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New "Artificial Synapse" Gets Closer to Mimicking Brain Connections

New "Artificial Synapse" Gets Closer to Mimicking Brain Connections | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A brain-inspired computing component provides the most faithful emulation yet of connections among neurons in the human brain, researchers say. The so-called memristor, an electrical component whose resistance relies on how much charge has passed through it in the past, mimics the way calcium ions behave at the junction between two neurons in the human brain, the study said. That junction is known as a synapse. The researchers said the new device could lead to significant advances in brain-inspired—or neuromorphic—computers, which could be much better at perceptual and learning tasks than traditional computers, as well as far more energy efficient."

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Carnegie Mellon Joins IARPA Project to Reverse-engineer Brain Algorithms

Carnegie Mellon Joins IARPA Project to Reverse-engineer Brain Algorithms | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Carnegie Mellon University is embarking on a five-year, $12 million research effort to reverse-engineer the brain, seeking to unlock the secrets of neural circuitry and the brain's learning methods. Researchers will use these insights to make computers think more like humans."

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Stanford Bioengineers Create Circuit Board Modeled on the Human Brain

Stanford Bioengineers Create Circuit Board Modeled on the Human Brain | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Stanford bioengineers have developed faster, more energy-efficient microchips based on the human brain – 9,000 times faster and using significantly less power than a typical PC. This offers greater possibilities for advances in robotics and a new way of understanding the brain. For instance, a chip as fast and efficient as the human brain could drive prosthetic limbs with the speed and complexity of our own actions."

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Nickelate Synaptic Transistors Could Improve Parallel Computing

Nickelate Synaptic Transistors Could Improve Parallel Computing | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Materials scientists at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have created a new type of transistor that mimics the behavior of a synapse. The synaptic transistor simultaneously modulates the flow of information in a circuit and physically adapts to changing signals. The technology could lead to creation of a new kind of artificial intelligence which is embedded in the very architecture of a computer rather than software."

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“Neuristor”: Memristors Used to Create a Neuron-like Behavior

“Neuristor”: Memristors Used to Create a Neuron-like Behavior | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Computing hardware is composed of a series of binary switches; they're either on or off. The other piece of computational hardware we're familiar with, the brain, doesn't work anything like that. Rather than being on or off, individual neurons exhibit brief spikes of activity, and encode information in the pattern and timing of these spikes. The differences between the two have made it difficult to model neurons using computer hardware. In fact, the recent, successful generation of a flexible neural system required that each neuron be modeled separately in software in order to get the sort of spiking behavior real neurons display.

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Samuel Free's curator insight, March 27, 2015 4:22 AM

Strange how complex technology resembles complex biology. i wonder if they could be amalgamated in the future. 

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IBM Scientists Imitate the Functionality of Neurons With a Phase-change Device

IBM Scientists Imitate the Functionality of Neurons With a Phase-change Device | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"IBM scientists have created randomly spiking neurons using phase-change materials to store and process data. This demonstration marks a significant step forward in the development of energy-efficient, ultra-dense integrated neuromorphic technologies for applications in cognitive computing. Inspired by the way the biological brain functions, scientists have theorized for decades that it should be possible to imitate the versatile computational capabilities of large populations of neurons. However, doing so at densities and with a power budget that would be comparable to those seen in biology has been a significant challenge, until now."

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The Human Brain’s Remarkably Low Power Consumption, and How Computers Might Mimic its Efficiency

The Human Brain’s Remarkably Low Power Consumption, and How Computers Might Mimic its Efficiency | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A new paper discusses the efficiency of neuronal computing and the ways in which we might better model the brain's function in future hardware. In some significant ways, we're clearly on the right track already.
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Insect Nervous System Copied To Boost Computing Power

Insect Nervous System Copied To Boost Computing Power | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Brains are the most powerful computers known. Now microchips built to mimic insects' nervous systems have been shown to successfully tackle technical computing problems like object recognition and data mining, researchers say.
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Neuro-Inspired Chips for Robots and Smartphones

Neuro-Inspired Chips for Robots and Smartphones | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The world’s largest smartphone chipmaker, Qualcomm, says it is ready to start helping partners manufacture a radically different kind of a chip—one that mimics the neural structures and processing methods found in the brain."

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