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The Remarkable Self-organization of Ants

The Remarkable Self-organization of Ants | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Give a colony of garden ants a week and a pile of dirt, and they'll transform it into an underground edifice about the height of a skyscraper in an ant-scaled city. Without a blueprint or a leader, thousands of insects moving specks of dirt create a complex, spongelike structure with parallel levels connected by a network of tunnels. [...] Knowing the rules behind ant-made structures could help scientists understand how other complex systems emerge in nature."

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Why Organizations Should Embrace Randomness Like Ant Colonies

Why Organizations Should Embrace Randomness Like Ant Colonies | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Consider the common ant. Each one is by genetic design capable of only a few simple behaviors and binary choices, making it a pretty dumb, rigid, inflexible being. Yet the collective behavior of an ant colony is adaptive, flexible and even creative; it’s a highly structured social organization. Now consider your average human. Most of us are individually adaptive, flexible and very creative. Yet the large organizations in which we work are often inflexible and incapable of adaptation and true innovation. Why are ant colonies so much better than the sum of their parts, while governments and companies are so often much worse?"

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Networks In Nature As Models For Business Networks

Networks In Nature As Models For Business Networks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Are business partnerships like relationships that occur in nature? Can organizations work together to defend their common interests when attacked by a competitor or an uncontrollable market force, like many plants do when threatened?
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Frog Calls Inspire a New Algorithm for Wireless Networks

Frog Calls Inspire a New Algorithm for Wireless Networks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

 
Male Japanese tree frogs use a method of calling that allows them to use their calls at the same time but in a way that allows the females to distinguish between them. Now, researchers from the Polytechnic University of Catalonia have mimicked this form of calling behavior in the creation of an algorithm that assigns colours to network nodes, the use of which can be applied to developing more efficient wireless networks.

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Leaf Veins Inspire New Model for Water and Electricity Distribution Networks

Leaf Veins Inspire New Model for Water and Electricity Distribution Networks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A team of biophysicists at Rockefeller University recently published a paper in Physical Review Letters about a new way to design distribution networks based on the veins that carry water and nutrients in most leaves."

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The Biological Basis of Resilient Cities

The Biological Basis of Resilient Cities | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Biological systems offer design strategies for successfully adapting to an age of climate change and resource depletion. Insights from nature will be essential in creating a green and sustainable future for humankind.
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What Ant Colony Networks Can Tell Us About What’s Next for Digital Networks

What Ant Colony Networks Can Tell Us About What’s Next for Digital Networks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Ever notice how ant colonies so successfully explore and exploit resources in the world … to find food at 4th of July picnics, for example? You may find it annoying. But as an ecologist who studies ants and collective behavior, I think it’s intriguing — especially the fact that it’s all done without any central control. What’s especially remarkable: the close parallels between ant colonies’ networks and human-engineered ones. One example is “Anternet”, where we, a group of researchers at Stanford, found that the algorithm desert ants use to regulate foraging is like the Traffic Control Protocol (TCP) used to regulate data traffic on the internet. Both ant and human networks use positive feedback: either from acknowledgements that trigger the transmission of the next data packet, or from food-laden returning foragers that trigger the exit of another outgoing forager."

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Bumblebee Flight Paths Could Inspire Faster Computers

Bumblebee Flight Paths Could Inspire Faster Computers | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Researchers found that bumblebees can quickly map out the shortest routes between flowers, a behavior that could inspire faster computers.
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Slime Mold Grows Network Just Like Tokyo Rail System

Slime Mold Grows Network Just Like Tokyo Rail System | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Talented and dedicated engineers spent countless hours designing Japan’s rail system to be one of the world’s most efficient. Could have just asked a slime mold. When presented with oat flakes arranged in the pattern of Japanese cities around Tokyo, brainless, single-celled slime molds construct networks of nutrient-channeling tubes that are strikingly similar to the layout of the Japanese rail system."

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