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Sharks Have Tough Skin Worthy of Biomimicry

Sharks Have Tough Skin Worthy of Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Sharks have tough skin that is worthy of biomimicry by nanotechnology designers and engineers. New coatings, textiles and other technologies that mimic the special biological properties of shark skin have been developed in recent years and many more such innovations are emerging across multiple industries."

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Inspired by Moth Eyeballs, Chemists Develop Gold Coating That Dims Glare

Inspired by Moth Eyeballs, Chemists Develop Gold Coating That Dims Glare | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Moth eyeballs are made up of tiny cones that reduce glare. UC Irvine researchers copied the pattern on a new, flexible material and coated it with a bit of gold to make a product that could improve solar panels, LED displays and disguising of weapons."

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Antibacterial Power of Black Silicon

Antibacterial Power of Black Silicon | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Earlier this year, we reported about a finding which revealed that physical structure of Psaltoda claripenniscicada wings can shred certain types of rod-shaped bacteria. After analyzing the surface, researchers at the Swinburne University of Technology used biomimicry to create a surface with similar properties. This nanosurface could lead to development of a new generation of nanostructured antibacterial materials. 

“Based on this discovery, we investigated other insects that may possess similar surface architectures that might kill more bacteria, in particular the deadly strains of the Staphylococcus aureus or golden staph bacterium”, said Elena Ivanova, microbiology professor at the Swinburne University of Technology. Their search led them to the wings of the Diplacodes bipunctata (Wandering Percher dragonfly), whose spike-like nanostructure destroys both rod-shaped and spherical bacteria."


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Deciphering Butterflies' Designer Colors: Findings Could Inspire New Hue-changing Materials

Deciphering Butterflies' Designer Colors: Findings Could Inspire New Hue-changing Materials | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Butterfly wings can do remarkable things with light, and humans are still trying to learn from them. Physicists have now uncovered how subtle differences in the tiny crystals of butterfly wings create stunningly varied patterns of color even among closely related species. The discovery, reported today in the Optical Society's (OSA) open-access journal Optical Materials Express, could lead to new coatings for manufactured materials that could change color by design, if researchers can figure out how to replicate the wings' light-manipulating properties."

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Controlling Wettability: 'Sticky tape' for Water Droplets Mimics Rose Petal

Controlling Wettability: 'Sticky tape' for Water Droplets Mimics Rose Petal | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

A new nanostructured material may lead to surfaces that stay dry forever, never need cleaning and are able to repel bacteria and even prevent mold and fungi growth. "The newly discovered material uses raspberry particles -- so-called because of their appearance -- which can trap tiny water droplets and prevent them from rolling off surfaces, even when that surface is turned upside down," said Dr Andrew Telford from the University's School of Chemistry and lead author of the research recently published in the journal, Chemistry of Materials. The raspberry particles mimic the surface structure of some rose petals.

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Cactus-inspired Material Cleans Oily Water

Cactus-inspired Material Cleans Oily Water | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Arrays of tiny copper spikes can clean oil from water, mimicking the way cacti pull water out of desert air.
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Harnessing The Power Of Peacocks To Make Colorful Images

Harnessing The Power Of Peacocks To Make Colorful Images | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The gloriously colored, iridescent feathers of the male peacock aren't what they seem on the surface. They look that way largely because the feathers contain nanometer-scale protein structures that break up incoming light waves, recombine and reflect them as rich, vibrant colors. Scientists at the University of Michigan think they have a technology that emulates this process to display pictures without chemicals or electrical power. Eventually, the technology could replace the displays now used on smartphones, tablets, and computer screens, with strikingly high definition."

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Russ Roberts's curator insight, June 11, 2013 11:41 AM

This discovery could change the way we view images on our tablets, cell phones, and computer screens.  There may be some amateur radio applications here.  Aloha de KH6JRM.

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Snake's Ultra-black Spots May Aid High-Tech Quest

Snake's Ultra-black Spots May Aid High-Tech Quest | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Scientists have identified nanostructures in the ultra-black skin markings of an African viper which they said [...] could inspire the quest to create the ultimate light-absorbing material."

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Cicada Wing Surface Biomimicry Could Lead to Anti-bacterial Surfaces

Cicada Wing Surface Biomimicry Could Lead to Anti-bacterial Surfaces | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"An international research group of researchers Australia's Swinburne University of Technology and Spain’s Universitat Rovira i Virgili investigated cicada insect and came up with a discovery that may lead to a surface able to destroy bacteria solely through its physical structure."

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Laurence's curator insight, March 12, 2013 8:41 AM

"...Une découverte qui pourrait déboucher sur un revêtement auto-destructeur de bactéries, de part sa seule structure physique ...des tests confirment toutefois que le système de défense sous forme de nanopiliers de la cigale, n'est vraiment efficace que contre les bactéries à membrane suffisamment souple..."

Si ces recherches aboutissent, imaginons les applications : poignées de porte, écrans tactiles, combiné de téléphone, sièges dans les transports publics et, pourquoi pas, emballage alimentaire ...? les bactéries sont partout !

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Engineers Follow Mother Nature's Lead on Keeping Clean

Engineers Follow Mother Nature's Lead on Keeping Clean | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

A recent study conducted by researchers at Ohio State University has found that rice leaves and butterfly wings make use of some unique surface characteristics that promote self-cleaning. The researchers believe that incorporating some of these features into man-made products might be key to tackling problems associated with biofouling.

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Nature-Inspired Nano-material Builds a Better Electrode, Points to Greener Future

Nature-Inspired Nano-material Builds a Better Electrode, Points to Greener Future | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

From the apple falling on Newton\'s head to batteries made out of root extract, scientists have long turned to nature for ideas. Following that tradition, the brainiacs over at the University of Reading have developed a new nano-material electrode coating based on the cellular structure of plants.

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Scorpions May Have Lessons to Teach Aircraft Designers

Scorpions May Have Lessons to Teach Aircraft Designers | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

The north African desert scorpion, Androctonus australis, is a hardy creature. Most animals that live in deserts dig burrows to protect themselves from the sand-laden wind. Not Androctonus. It usually toughs things out at the surface. Yet when the sand whips by at speeds that would strip paint away from steel, the scorpion is able to scurry off without apparent damage. Han Zhiwu of Jilin University, in China, and his colleagues wondered why.

 

Their curiosity is not just academic. Aircraft engines and helicopter rotor-blades are constantly abraded by atmospheric dust, and a way of slowing down this abrasion would be welcome. Dr Han suspects that scorpions may provide an answer. As he writes in Langmuir, he has discovered that the surface of Androctonus's exoskeleton is odd. And when that oddness is translated into other materials it seems to protect them, as well.

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University of Akron's Research into Geckos' Natural Stickiness may Pay Off in Companies and Products

University of Akron's Research into Geckos' Natural Stickiness may Pay Off in Companies and Products | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

The University of Akron's research into what makes geckos' feet stick to almost anything -- part of an emerging field called bio-inspiration -- could have big payoffs in industrial adhesives, electronics, robotics and other fields.

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Quenching the World's Water and Energy Crises, One Tiny Droplet at a Time

Quenching the World's Water and Energy Crises, One Tiny Droplet at a Time | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"In the Namib Desert of Africa, the fog-filled morning wind carries the drinking water for a beetle called the Stenocara. iny droplets collect on the beetle's bumpy back. The areas between the bumps are covered in a waxy substance that makes them water-repellant, or hydrophobic (water-fearing). Water accumulates on the water-loving, or hydrophilic, bumps, forming droplets that eventually grow too big to stay put, then roll down the waxy surface. [...]  More than a decade ago, news of this creature's efficient water collection system inspired engineers to try and reproduce these surfaces in the lab. Small-scale advances in fluid physics, materials engineering and nanoscience since that time have brought them close to succeeding."




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Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors

Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Imitating nature is not a new idea. When the GE team put Morpho wings under a powerful microscope, they saw a layer of tiny scales just tens of micrometers across. In turn, each of the scales had arrays of ridges a few hundred nanometers wide. This complex structure absorbs and bends light and givesMorfo butterflies their trademark shimmering blue and green coat."

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 6, 5:50 PM

Great ideas are often taken from nature! Check this one out!

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Waterproof Surface is 'Driest Ever'

Waterproof Surface is 'Driest Ever' | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"US engineers have created the "most waterproof material ever" - inspired by nasturtium leaves and butterfly wings. The new "super-hydrophobic" surface could keep clothes dry and stop aircraft engines icing over, they say."

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Springtails Inspire Great Leap in Super Materials

Springtails Inspire Great Leap in Super Materials | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Norwegian researchers are using insights from the animal kingdom in their quest to design new self-cleansing and water-repellant surface materials.
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Butterfly Inspires Nanodevice

Butterfly Inspires Nanodevice | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Butterfly wings have inspired the design of a tiny crystal that could make telecommunications faster.
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Crickethair Sensor is 'Highlight' of Bio-Inspired Technology

Crickethair Sensor is 'Highlight' of Bio-Inspired Technology | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"One of the top ten highlights of the past year, in terms of technology that is inspired by nature. That was how the journal Bioinspiration & Biomimetics described a paper by researchers from the University of Twente's MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology. The publication describes new technology involving the use of sensors to measure flow patterns. Source of inspiration: the hairs on cricket abdomens."

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Sharklet: A Biotech Startup Fights Germs With Sharks

Sharklet: A Biotech Startup Fights Germs With Sharks | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Forget chemicals or pills in the fight against nasty bacterial infections. Entrepreneur Mark Spiecker is betting that the secrte lies with sharks. Those fast and carnivorous fish just happen to have microscopic textures on their skin that make them highly resistant to barnacles, algae and, surprisingly, most human bacteria."

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Harvard Creates Beautiful, Self-Assembled Nanoflowers to Better Understand Nature

Harvard Creates Beautiful, Self-Assembled Nanoflowers to Better Understand Nature | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The beautiful flowers that you see above, and dotted throughout the rest of this story, are around 25 micrometers tall and 10 micrometers wide. Even more impressively, these flowers self-assembled from three fairly normal chemical compounds. Rather than just an exercise in aesthetics, though, scientists hope these nanoflowers can improve our scientific understanding of how immensely complex structures in nature, such as human embryos, self-assemble."

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Engineers Mimic How Peacocks do Color for Screen Displays

Engineers Mimic How Peacocks do Color for Screen Displays | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Engineers trying to mimic the peacocks’ color mechanism for screens have locked in structural color, which is made with texture rather than chemicals.
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Researchers Reverse Engineer Fireflies To Make More Efficient LEDs

Researchers Reverse Engineer Fireflies To Make More Efficient LEDs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Sometimes, a trick gets pulled off better in nature than it does in a laboratory. That might be the case with new research claiming fireflies' unique
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Butterfly-Wing Wafers to Clad Iridescent Buildings

Butterfly-Wing Wafers to Clad Iridescent Buildings | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Now no one can say butterflies are all style and no substance. This might look like a pretty lily pad but it is actually a wafer created with lasers to mimic the iridescent colours of a butterfly's wings. For extra credit, Shu Yang at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, who led the project, also made the wafer water-repellent - another property of butterflies' wings, which helps them fly through rain.

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Morpho Butterflies Inspire Dye-Free Colored Fibers-Morphotex

Morpho Butterflies  Inspire Dye-Free Colored Fibers-Morphotex | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Morphotex is the world’s first optical coloring fiber, inspired by the chromogenic principle of Morpho butterflies that inhabit areas along the Amazon in South Africa. Called “living jewels,” the cobalt-blue wings of Morpho butterflies impart vivid color although they have no pigmentation.

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