Biomimicry
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Nature inspired innovation
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Bacteria Have ‘Biological Wheels’ That We Can Finally See In 3D

Bacteria Have ‘Biological Wheels’ That We Can Finally See In 3D | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Among bacteria’s many attributes, perhaps one of its most overlooked yet important ones is its ability to propel itself via flagellum, a unique appendage hanging off its end. This mechanism is a perfect example of a naturally occurring, biological wheel. Aside from the beautiful novelty of these images, researchers could study them to develop better motors for nano-robots, or to design better antibiotics that target the flagellum specific to a certain bacteria.[...] Now, for the first time, scientists were able to take a high resolution, 3D look at these wheels at work, using an electron microscope."

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Biomimetic Nano-Machines Mimic Muscle Fibers

Biomimetic Nano-Machines Mimic Muscle Fibers | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

An assembly of thousands of nano-machines has produced a coordinated contraction movement - like that of muscle fibers, and it even extended to around ten micrometers, like the movements of muscular fibers.The work provides an experimental validation of a biomimetic approach that has been conceptualized for years in nanoscience and the researchers believe this broadens applications in robotics, information storage and obviously artificial muscles themselves.

 

Photo details: Skeletal muscle. GNU Free Documentation License, 2006, Department of Histology, Jagiellonian University Medical College. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Skeletal_muscle_-_longitudinal_section.jpg

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Cloaked DNA Nanodevices Survive Pilot Mission

Cloaked DNA Nanodevices Survive Pilot Mission | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"It's a familiar trope in science fiction: In enemy territory, activate your cloaking device. And real-world viruses use similar tactics to make themselves invisible to the immune system. Now scientists at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have mimicked these viral tactics to build the first DNA nanodevices that survive the body's immune defenses."

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