Biomimicry
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Scientists Have Created Self-Healing Fabrics that Also Protect from Harmful Chemicals

Scientists Have Created Self-Healing Fabrics that Also Protect from Harmful Chemicals | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

2Protective clothing is critical to the health and safety of workers who handle hazardous chemicals. A new fabric coating promises to not only neutralize toxins, but also to heal tears and holes on its own while the clothes go through the laundry. The coating, developed by a team of researchers from Penn State and Drexel University, is derived from proteins that make up the rings of teeth on squid suckers."

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The Jelly Inside a Shark's Nose is More Electrically Sensitive Than Any Man Made Material on Earth

The Jelly Inside a Shark's Nose is More Electrically Sensitive Than Any Man Made Material on Earth | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A biological material that has existed for millions of years may find new applications in modern electronics. A team of scientists from UC Santa Cruz, the University of Washington, and the Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason discovered that shark “jelly” is the highest proton conductive biological substance ever found, according to GizMag. In plain English, that means the material is extremely good at detecting weak electrical signals from great distances away — something that scientists and engineers believe could be useful in future sensor design.
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Spider Silk Inspires Creation of ‘Liquid Wire’

Spider Silk Inspires Creation of ‘Liquid Wire’ | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Scientists have discovered a previously unknown property of spider silk, and used it to create a remarkable new “hybrid” material. The new bio-inspired thread, which acts like both a solid and a liquid, could lead to a host of new materials and technologies.
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Ultra-strong 3D Printed Material Inspired by Natural Herringbone Pattern on Mantis Shrimp

Ultra-strong 3D Printed Material Inspired by Natural Herringbone Pattern on Mantis Shrimp | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside and Purdue University have used the mantis shrimp as inspiration for a new 3D printed material. The crustacean’s club-like appendage, used to beat prey, consists of an unusual herringbone pattern, which the researchers synthetically replicated.
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Fibrous Structures

Fibrous Structures | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
“An elytron is very delicate and super lightweight, because after all, the beetle still needs to fly,” says Achim Menges, an architect and professor at the University of Stuttgart. “At the same time it’s very robust and exceptionally high performance.”

It was these elytra, the fibrous structures in the forewing shells of flying beetles, that inspired the Elytra Filament Pavilion.
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Why Nature Prefers Hexagons

Why Nature Prefers Hexagons | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"How do bees do it? The honeycombs in which they store their amber nectar are marvels of precision engineering, an array of prism-shaped cells with a perfectly hexagonal cross-section. The wax walls are made with a very precise thickness, the cells are gently tilted from the horizontal to prevent the viscous honey from running out, and the entire comb is aligned with the Earth’s magnetic field. Yet this structure is made without any blueprint or foresight, by many bees working simultaneously and somehow coordinating their efforts to avoid mismatched cells."

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Marcelo Errera's curator insight, April 22, 11:39 PM
The evolution of design, configuration, structure, organization is a natural phenomenon. Evidence massively supports it. There's no designer, there's only the Constructal Law.

I challenge anyone to count the percentage of "mathematical hexagons" in a honeycomb. 
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Airbus Starts 3D Printing Airplane Cabin Partition That Mimics Cells and Bones' Structure

Airbus Starts 3D Printing Airplane Cabin Partition That Mimics Cells and Bones' Structure | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Airbus and its subsidiary APWorks, in collaboration with Autodesk-owned architecture firm The Living, has started 3D printing the world’s largest metal 3D printed airplane part. The jet partition, 3D printed in a high-tech alloy called “Scalmalloy”, is 45% lighter than current partitions. [...] To create the most durable and lightweight design possible, the project team sought inspiration from nature. Bionics, which involves examining natural mechanics to see how they could be mimicked in technological devices, has been crucial in the production of the 3D printed component. The jet partition was created with custom algorithms, which generated a design that mimics cellular structure and bone growth. Airbus has also been exploring weight-saving aircraft structures based on the construction of super-strong water lilies, and torsion springs based on fish jaws."

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jibeworks's curator insight, January 19, 6:50 PM

3d Printing is a game changer...

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Ford Looks to Make its Cars Easier to Recycle with Gecko Inspired Adhesive

Ford Looks to Make its Cars Easier to Recycle with Gecko Inspired Adhesive | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Dearborn, Michigan based car maker, Ford Motor Company, is working with Procter & Gamble to develop an adhesive inspired by geckos to improve the recyclability of its cars. Ford said that its researchers have considered ways to make auto manufacturing more sustainable for years. A key challenge is glue used to adhere foams to plastics and metals can make disassembling parts for recycling nearly impossible.

Enter the gecko. The company explained that the lizard’s toe pads allow it to stick to most surfaces without liquids or surface tension. The reptile can then easily release itself, leaving no residue.  [...] According to Debbie Mielewski, Ford senior technical leader for plastics and sustainability research, the gecko could inspire a host of adhesive innovations for global applications at Ford."

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Learning From Teeth And Seashells

Learning From Teeth And Seashells | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Teeth and seashells are tough and durable materials and are considered among the toughest that nature has to offer. Based on the super-strong properties, scientists have been looking at how these materials are structured in order to create tougher materials. New research has uncovered the secret to the inner strength of the materials: they are composed different layers within which numerous micro-platelets are joined together. These platelets are aligned in identical orientation within each layer. This structural complexity has proved difficult to replicate, at least until André Studart, who is the Professor of Complex Materials at ETH Zurich, began studying images at the molecular level."

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Water Bear Inspires New Kind of Glass

Water Bear Inspires New Kind of Glass | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A really weird, really tiny animal — the microscopic tardigrade — is the inspiration behind a new material that could improve the efficiency of things like LED lights to solar cells. The material under investigation is glass, and tardigrades (sometimes known as "water bears" or "moss piglets") know a thing or two about glass. These water-dwelling critters, which look like tiny blimps with pudgy bodies and eight stubby legs, are capable of shedding almost all of the water in their cells when exposed to extreme conditions, such as heat, cold or even the vacuum of space."

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Astonishing Water-sensitive Building Material Acts Just Like Pine Cones

Astonishing Water-sensitive Building Material Acts Just Like Pine Cones | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Royal College of Art design student Chao Chen has developed a revolutionary new building material that responds to the presence of water. After observing the hydro-sensitive behavior of pine cones, which open and close depending upon their exposure to water, Chen has developed a wood laminate material that similarly bends and flexes in response to atmospheric humidity, soil moisture or rain. Applications for the technology include shelters that seal up when it rains and building cladding that opens to let in more light on a dull, drizzly day but closes to block out heat when the weather is hot and dry."

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New Nano Materials Inspired by Bird Feathers Play with Light to Create Color

New Nano Materials Inspired by Bird Feathers Play with Light to Create Color | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Inspired by the way iridescent bird feathers play with light, scientists have created thin films of material in a wide range of pure colors — from red to green — with hues determined by physical structure rather than pigments.

Structural color arises from the interaction of light with materials that have patterns on a minute scale, which bend and reflect light to amplify some wavelengths and dampen others. Melanosomes, tiny packets of melanin found in the feathers, skin and fur of many animals, can produce structural color when packed into solid layers, as they are in the feathers of some birds. 

“We synthesized and assembled nanoparticles of a synthetic version of melanin to mimic the natural structures found in bird feathers,” said Nathan Gianneschi, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego. “We want to understand how nature uses materials like this, then to develop function that goes beyond what is possible in nature."

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Fish and Flowers Inspire Diving Goggle Material

Fish and Flowers Inspire Diving Goggle Material | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Light scattering means that many synthetic oil-repellent surfaces are opaque, limiting their use. A transparent, oil-repellent surface would have applications in biology and underwater optics, including in diving goggles and cameras. Now, Feng Chen’s research group at Xi’an Jiaotong University has developed such a material. Fish repel oil by trapping water within their scales to create a self-cleaning, oil-repellent coat and prompted part of the idea behind the work. Chen’s other brainwave was triggered by Diphylleia grayi – also known as the skeleton flower."

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lavieepanouie's curator insight, April 22, 2015 5:16 PM

Ou comment la nature nous inspire !

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Coconuts Can Inspire Us to Make Stronger Buildings

Coconuts Can Inspire Us to Make Stronger Buildings | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Coconut palms can grow as high as 30m, and when the ripe fruits fall to the ground their walls must protect them from splitting open. To protect the internal seed, coconuts have a structure of three layers which allow them to withstand heavy impacts. The university’s Plant Biomechanics Group believes this specialised structure could be applied in architecture, and has been working with civil engineers and material scientists to develop this idea as part of a programme called Biological Design and Integrative Structures. [...] The group found that the ladder-like design of vessels in the coconut’s inner endocarp layer “dissipates energy via crack deflection," meaning newly-developed cracks created by an impact don't run directly through the hard shell, but are diverted and stop before the crack separates the fruit. "

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Researchers Uncover the Secret Behind Ivy’s Natural Adhesive

Researchers Uncover the Secret Behind Ivy’s Natural Adhesive | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Charles Darwin was the first to observe that Ivy exudes a liquid adhesive that helps it to cling to surfaces. Now researchers at Ohio State University have identified the protein that allows Ivy to stick. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) allow Ivy’s adhesive to enter nanoscale openings rather than just coating surfaces. Curing takes place due to calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and pectic acids. As water evaporates from the adhesive, chemical bonds are formed between adhesive and substrate. The researchers say that their discovery opens up the possibility of applying its findings to the development of adhesives for a wide range of applications ranging from medical adhesives to coatings and even cosmetics."

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Novel 4D Printing Method Blossoms From Botanical Inspiration

Novel 4D Printing Method Blossoms From Botanical Inspiration | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A team of scientists at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University and the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has evolved their microscale 3D printing technology to the fourth dimension, time. Inspired by natural structures like plants, which respond and change their form over time according to environmental stimuli, the team has unveiled 4D-printed hydrogel composite structures that change shape upon immersion in water."

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Clubbing Together Shrimp Inspired Materials

Clubbing Together Shrimp Inspired Materials | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The mantis shrimp is a small, multi-coloured marine crustacean, with a number sporting fist-like appendage called a dactyl club. This particular variety of mantis shrimp is known as a smasher, as it crushes its prey with its club. Through the study of these creatures, researchers at University of California Riverside and Purdue University, USA, have taken steps toward developing ultra strong composite materials based on the unique herringbone structure within the dactyl club’s outer layer.
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Ski Design Inspired by Turtle Scales

Ski Design Inspired by Turtle Scales | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Looking for skis to maximize the fun as you hurtle down the slopes? The ideal ski can withstand high levels of pressure in turns yet also be easy to maneuver. These two features usually require two different types of skis: the rigid skis preferred by expert skiers or the flexible ones that intermediate skiers opt for. But a new type of ski offers a two-in-one solution thanks to a design based on turtle scales.
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How Nature Makes Things: Relevant Bio-Inspired Approaches

How Nature Makes Things: Relevant Bio-Inspired Approaches | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Additive manufacturing shows great promise for making things in a way that more closely resembles natural form, but some of the below strategies are worth investigating to reduce or eliminate toxicity and to make more functional products.".

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North Face's New Jacket is Made From Synthetic Spider’s Silk

North Face's New Jacket is Made From Synthetic Spider’s Silk | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Spider's silk is as strong as steel, lighter than carbon fibre and tougher than Kevlar.  Several research groups are hoping harness these remarkable properties by creating synthetic versions of the material.

Now, North Face has partnered with one of these teams to create a jacket made from a fiber named 'Qmonos' – the Japanese word for spider."

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Learning From Nature: Architects and Biomimicry

Learning From Nature: Architects and Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

From creating breathable metals to copying how animals cool their homes, architects and designers are increasingly using the principles of biomimicry in their work. Christopher DeWolf takes a look at how the discipline is evolving.

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Boxfish Shell Inspires New Materials for Body Armor and Flexible Electronics

Boxfish Shell Inspires New Materials for Body Armor and Flexible Electronics | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The boxfish’s unique armor draws its strength from hexagon-shaped scales and the connections between them, engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have found. They describe their findings and the carapace of the boxfish (Lactoria cornuta) in the July 27 issue of the journal Acta Materialia. Engineers also describe how the structure of the boxfish could serve as inspiration for body armor, robots and even flexible elctronics."

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Researchers Use Multi-material 3D Printing to Fabricate the First Biomimetic Shark Skin

Researchers Use Multi-material 3D Printing to Fabricate the First Biomimetic Shark Skin | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Scientists have been trying to unlock the secrets of shark skin for more than 50 years. The key to sharks' hydrodynamic prowess lies in how the rigid, tooth-like structures that coat their flexible skin change the flow of water as sharks swim forward – but attempts to quantify this effect have fallen short. After all, it's tough to fabricate a material that closely mimics shark skin, a marvel of Nature honed over the 400 million years that sharks have sleuthed the seas."

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Marcelo Errera's curator insight, July 14, 2015 3:03 PM

Mimicking is a great way of fast-forwarding the design process. It is a never ending process.

 

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Snake Skin Inspired Surfaces Smash Records, Providing 40 Percent Friction Reduction

Snake Skin Inspired Surfaces Smash Records, Providing 40 Percent Friction Reduction | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Snake skin inspired surfaces smash records, providing an astonishing 40% friction reduction in tests of high performance materials. These new surfaces could improve the reliability of mechanical components in machines such as high performance cars and add grist to the mill of engineers designing a new generation of space exploration robots."

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Glass Sponges Hold Internal Secrets to Structural Strength

Glass Sponges Hold Internal Secrets to Structural Strength | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Scientists often look to biology for inspiration and innovation, emulating the way that nature builds to advance human engineering. Creatures of the ocean's depths are some of the most mysterious and fascinating subjects for study, due to the challenges of collecting them from very deep waters and for their unique adaptations for colonizing the sea floor. One such group is the hexactinellids, a collection of predominantly deep-sea sponges that produce elaborate skeletal systems of glass. Known as glass sponges, over the years their skeletal systems and their constituent elements (called spicules) have served as useful model systems for the design and fabrication of robust and damage tolerance."

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