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Insect Gears Could Change the Way You Look at Eengineering

Insect Gears Could Change the Way You Look at Eengineering | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Issus coleoptratus is an unlikely hero, but one whose jumping prowess could revolutionize ballistics and spring-loaded machines. [...] In Science, Malcolm Burrows and Gregory Sutton (of the University of Cambridge and University of Bristol, respectively) describe a mechanism on the hind legs of a jumping insect that can only be described as a gear, cogs and all.

Although the structure had been seen before, their investigation of its action, using high speed cameras, has revealed its function: the first known case of an intermeshing gear mechanism that was not cast or forged, but that had evolved."

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Insect Nervous System Copied To Boost Computing Power

Insect Nervous System Copied To Boost Computing Power | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Brains are the most powerful computers known. Now microchips built to mimic insects' nervous systems have been shown to successfully tackle technical computing problems like object recognition and data mining, researchers say.
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Rise Of The Insect Drones

Rise Of The Insect Drones | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Nature spent millions of years perfecting flapping-wing flight. Now engineers can reproduce it with machines.
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Scientists of Kiel University Unravel Widespread Natural Adhesion System

Scientists of Kiel University Unravel Widespread Natural Adhesion System | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Adhesion is an extremely important factor in living nature: insects can climb up walls, plants can twine up them, and cells are able to adhere to surfaces. During evolution, many of them developed mushroom-shaped adhesive structures and organs. Lars Heepe and his colleagues at Kiel University have discovered why the specific shape is advantageous for adhesion. The answer is in homogeneous stress distribution between a surface and the adhesive element. [...] The findings of the study made in Kiel can be used for further development of glue-free adhesive surfaces with enhanced performance."

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Movement Without Muscles Study in Insects Could Inspire Robot and Prosthetic Limb Developments

Movement Without Muscles Study in Insects Could Inspire Robot and Prosthetic Limb Developments | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Neurobiologists from the University of Leicester have shown that insect limbs can move without muscles - a finding that may provide engineers with new ways to improve the control of robotic and prosthetic limbs. Their work helps to explain how insects control their movements using a close interplay of neuronal control and 'clever biomechanical tricks,' says lead researcher Dr Tom Matheson, a Reader in Neurobiology at the University of Leicester."

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Harvard is Building Robotic Cockroaches

Harvard is Building Robotic Cockroaches | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The art and science of biomimicry teaches us to find solutions to our problems by looking at what nature has come up with to solve similar problems. This is what the microrobotics team at Harvard has apparently done with these small cockroach-like autonomous robots. Like insects, their legs move so fast that we must slow down a video of their movements to understand how they do it."

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The Artificial Insect Eye That Will Give Sight To Tiny Drones

The Artificial Insect Eye That Will Give Sight To Tiny Drones | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Humans see the world through a pair of high resolution, single lens eyes that allow us to adjust focus and pinpoint fine details. But simpler creatures, like insects, instead rely on compound eyes that have lower resolution but offer a much wider distortion-free field-of-view that's actually better suited for lightning fast motion perception. And as researchers work towards designing autonomous drones that will behave like futuristic artificial bugs, it's only fitting that they also work to replicate how an insect sees.

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Robot Ants Mimic Insect Behaviour

Robot Ants Mimic Insect Behaviour | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Tiny robotic ants created by scientists in the US are able to navigate through a network by following one another's trail, footage reveals.
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Traffic Signals Inspired by Bugs

Traffic Signals Inspired by Bugs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The way ants and termites navigate their own versions of gridlock inspires an algorithm that helps control human traffic on busy streets.
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Antennae Help Flies "Cruise" In Gusty Winds

Antennae Help Flies "Cruise" In Gusty Winds | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Caltech researchers uncover a mechanism for how fruit flies regulate their flight speed, using both vision and wind-sensing information from their antennae.
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Termite-like Robots Can Construct Buildings wWith no Central Leader

Termite-like Robots Can Construct Buildings wWith no Central Leader | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Insects don’t have the capacity to reason, and yet some are capable of building complex structures and executing complex foraging expeditions with no central organizing. That’s why researchers recently sent ants to the International Space Station and will observe how the change in gravity affects the ants’ ability to organize. At Harvard, scientists are taking their inspiration from termites, which can spend generations building mounds that stretch multiple feet into the air. On Thursday, a research team revealed a crew of iPad-sized robots that can build structures with no input from a central leader."

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Insect-Eye Camera Offers Wide-Angle Vision for Tiny Drones

Insect-Eye Camera Offers Wide-Angle Vision for Tiny Drones | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Entomologists study insects known for their hard exoskeletons, jointed appendages, segmented bodies, bilateral symmetry and antennae. But perhaps the most impressive part of an insect is its lateral compound eyes. Scientists wishing to study insects have over 1 million species to select from!

Insect eyes are so impressive scientist and researcher John Rogers of the Science Research Group at Urbana-Champaign, University of Illinois, is designing miniature drones cameras based on their unique design. The big challenge for engineers is to build a drone camera with a 180° range of vision and clear vision throughout that line of sight. Insects have this ability when born."

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Sieg Holle's curator insight, January 3, 9:30 AM

tech breakthrough?

 

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Shape-changing Lens Blends Human and Insect Vision

Shape-changing Lens Blends Human and Insect Vision | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"One example of biomimicry that keeps popping up on the pages of Gizmag is the use of insect eyes as a model for innovative new optical devices. It seems that the potential for development in this area is far from exhausted with the announcement of another bug-inspired lens breakthrough from Ohio State University. This experimental lens developed by associate professor of biomedical engineering and ophthalmology, Yi Zhao, combines the wide angle properties of insect vision with the depth-of-field capabilities of a human eye."

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3D Printer-Built Robot Has Insect Moves

3D Printer-Built Robot Has Insect Moves | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Some robotics experts focused on biomimicry have turned to work in tech hives where their tiny robots are designed to imitate the moves of insects. At UC Berkleley's Biomimetic Millisystems Lab, David Zarrouk, Andrew Pullin, Nick Kohut, and Ronald Fearing are working on STAR, which stands for Sprawl Tuned Autonomous Robot. In their paper of the same title, "STAR, A Sprawl Tuned Autonomous Robot," they present their project, a six-legged, sprawl-tuned robot with a variable leg sprawl angle in the transverse plane to adapt its stiffness, height, and leg-to-surface contact angle."

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Super Fly Hearing Powers Captured in Miniature Microphone

Super Fly Hearing Powers Captured in Miniature Microphone | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A new microphone based on a fly's ear could spur the next big improvement in the acoustical performance of hearing aids, as well as inspire better instruments wherever optimizing directional noise capture to improve signal to noise ratio matters."

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How Insects’ Wings Help Engineers…

How Insects’ Wings Help Engineers… | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Insects are one of the most successful groups of animals…so what can we learn from them? Examining how insects' wings and legs wear out over time may help engineers as they search for ways to make safe, more durable types of material.

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Innovate: Solar Designs from Nature

Innovate: Solar Designs from Nature | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
In the quest to draw power from the sun, nothing is more motivated than plants and insects.
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