Biomimicry
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Nature inspired innovation
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Silvery Hairs Turn Ants into Walking Mirrors

Silvery Hairs Turn Ants into Walking Mirrors | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

One ant species in the Sahara Desert is covered by a silvery sheen of body hair that acts as a wearable sun shield for the creatures, a new study finds. The silvery hairs completely reflect the light like mirrors, preventing the ants from absorbing too much heat. That may help to explain how the Saharan silver ants can stay cool when temperatures in the arid region reach a blistering 122 degrees Fahrenheit (50 degrees Celsisus).

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Crickethair Sensor is 'Highlight' of Bio-Inspired Technology

Crickethair Sensor is 'Highlight' of Bio-Inspired Technology | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"One of the top ten highlights of the past year, in terms of technology that is inspired by nature. That was how the journal Bioinspiration & Biomimetics described a paper by researchers from the University of Twente's MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology. The publication describes new technology involving the use of sensors to measure flow patterns. Source of inspiration: the hairs on cricket abdomens."

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University of Akron's Research into Geckos' Natural Stickiness may Pay Off in Companies and Products

University of Akron's Research into Geckos' Natural Stickiness may Pay Off in Companies and Products | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

The University of Akron's research into what makes geckos' feet stick to almost anything -- part of an emerging field called bio-inspiration -- could have big payoffs in industrial adhesives, electronics, robotics and other fields.

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Carl Messenger-Lehmann's curator insight, December 30, 2014 1:41 AM

We Know gecko's are cool - we just didn't realize they were this cool!

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Spider Hairs Biomimicry for Hydrophobic Surfaces

Spider Hairs Biomimicry for Hydrophobic Surfaces | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Engineering researchers have created what they say is a “nearly perfect hydrophobic interface” by mimicking spiders. By using plastic to reproduce the shape and patterns of the minute hairs that grow on the bodies of spiders, the researchers have created one of the most water-phobic surfaces yet.

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Blue Tarantulas May Help Humans Make Better Wide-angle Computer Displays

Blue Tarantulas May Help Humans Make Better Wide-angle Computer Displays | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"At least 40 species of tarantulas come in shades of blue.  [...] To find out more about the "tarantula blue," researchers used different microscopy techniques to analyze tarantula hairs. They found that although these species share a shade of blue, tarantulas don't use pigments to produce it. Instead, the blue colors are produced thanks to nanostructures in the spiders' hair, which reflect blue light. And these nanostructures differ between species, the scientists found. Most importantly, however, these blue colors don’t change intensity or hue as the viewing angle changes. That's a big differentiator from the highly iridescent structural colors seen in most birds, butterflies, and beetles."

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Here's to Hoping Geckskin (Biomimetic Gecko-Based Tape) Sticks Around

Here's to Hoping Geckskin (Biomimetic Gecko-Based Tape) Sticks Around | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

More than five years ago we first wrote about Geckel, a biomimetic adhesive based on geckos' and mussels' ability to stick to things. But as of this year the material was still "under development." Perhaps Duncan Irschick and Alfred Crosby, from UMass Amherst, will have better luck. The pair of scientists--one from Biology, the other from Polymer Science & Engineering--have devised "Geckskin," a reusable tape that can reportedly stick something weighing 700 pounds to a flat wall. Manufacturers of wall mounts for flatscreen TVs ought to be worried.

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Electronic Sensor Rivals Sensitivity of Human Skin

Electronic Sensor Rivals Sensitivity of Human Skin | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Devices inspired by beetle wings could give robots a more nuanced sense of touch.
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