Biomimicry
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Robotic Bee Drones Could Be The Future Of Agriculture

Robotic Bee Drones Could Be The Future Of Agriculture | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"This robotic bee drone prototype gives bees a hand in pollinating flowers and could be a solution to the dwindling bee population. [...] Part-awareness rising project, part-potential solution to a very real problem, Plan Bee is a self sustainable drone that stimulates the growth of plants by cross-pollination. The drone sucks pollen through tiny holes located underneath and then pushes it back out through the vents on top. As the drone flies over the field, the pollen will fall on the flowers nearby. The device is also equipped with a UV camera to locate the flowers."

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Renato P. dos Santos's curator insight, March 31, 9:03 AM
Not the 'Black Mirror' type, please. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt5709236/
DroneFeed.io's curator insight, April 4, 1:22 AM

Something interesting

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Bee Model Could Be Breakthrough for Autonomous Drone Development

Bee Model Could Be Breakthrough for Autonomous Drone Development | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Bees control their flight using the speed of motion (optic flow) of the visual world around them. A study by Scientists at the University of Sheffield Department of Computer Science suggests how motion-direction detecting circuits could be wired together to also detect motion-speed, which is crucial for controlling bees’ flight.

“Honeybees are excellent navigators and explorers, using vision extensively in these tasks, despite having a brain of only one million neurons,” said Alex Cope, PhD., lead researcher on the paper. “Understanding how bees avoid walls, and what information they can use to navigate, moves us closer to the development of efficient algorithms for navigation and routing, which would greatly enhance the performance of autonomous flying robotics,” he added.
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Hairy Animals Teach Us How to Keep Robots Clean

Hairy Animals Teach Us How to Keep Robots Clean | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Drones and other autonomous vehicles, including Mars rovers, are susceptible to failure because of the accumulation of dirt and other airborne particles that interfere with electronics and sensors. Associate professor David Hu and his colleagues from Georgia Institute of Technology scrutinized more than two dozen studies and analyzed 27 animals to better understand how the critters kept clean. What the scientists found could improve the way sensitive electronics, robots, sensors and unmanned aerial vehicles are kept free of pollen and dirt."

 
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A Drone With Bug Vision

A Drone With Bug Vision | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Almost anything that flies, be it a plane, a spacecraft, or a drone, has an inertial navigation system with accelerometers and gyroscopes that control yaw, pitch and roll, and thus the flight path. Flying insects like bees, however, don't have inertial systems to guide them; they rely exclusively on what they see. This has inspired two researchers at the Aix-Marseille University in France to build a drone that imitates the way these insects navigate. Their mission was to design it to fly and circumvent obstacles by relying solely on visual cues. "

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Nature Inspires Flying Robot Design

Nature Inspires Flying Robot Design | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Nature is inspiring the design of the next generation of drones, or flying robots, that could eventually be used for everything from military surveillance to search and rescue."

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9 Drones Inspired by Nature

9 Drones Inspired by Nature | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Drones are becoming an undeniable part of our future and many researchers look toward the natural world for design inspiration.
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Bat Bot is an Autonomous Drone That Mimics a Bat's Flight

Bat Bot is an Autonomous Drone That Mimics a Bat's Flight | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Robotic birds and winged insects are relatively easy to create, but with over 40 joints in their wings, bats offer a new level of intricacy. Or, as Caltech professor and Jet Propulsion Laboratory researcher Soon-Jo Chung put it during a press conference, "bat flight is the holy grail of aerial robotics. [...] By simplifying that wing structure into just nine key joints covered by a flexible membrane, however, the team successfully created the first Bat Bot. Built from carbon fiber bones and 3D-printed socket joints, Bat Bot weighs just 93 grams and the silicon-based wing membrane is only 56 microns thick with a roughly one-foot wingspan."

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Insect Eyes Enable Drones to Fly Independently

Insect Eyes Enable Drones to Fly Independently | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"After studying how insects navigate through dense vegetation, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have come up with a system that can be applied to flying robots. By adapting the system to drones, they can be made to adjust their speed to their surroundings and fly on their own- completely without human intervention and control. The breakthrough was made by vision researchers Emily Baird and Marie Dacke at the Department of Biology in Lund. Among other things, their research shows how bees that fly through dense forests assess light intensity to avoid other objects and find holes in the vegetation to enable them to navigate safely."

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Swans Help Create Smoother Camera Drone Videos

Swans Help Create Smoother Camera Drone Videos | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The next time you see a graceful, dramatic video shot by a camera drone, you may have a swan to thank for the absence of any jittery footage. Stanford University researchers aredeveloping camera suspension technology inspired by whooping swans, whose heads remain remarkably still even when they're making aggressive in-flight maneuvers. Thanks to a blend of high-speed video and computer modeling, the scientists discovered that the swan's neck acts much like a vehicle's suspension, passively countering the effects of flapping wings or headwinds."

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Special Research Journal Issue on Biomimetic Drone Control

Special Research Journal Issue on Biomimetic Drone Control | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The Journal of Bioinspiration and Biomimetics has a special issue on bioinspired drone control. Chock full of fascinating stuff, most of it free to read."

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Rise Of The Insect Drones

Rise Of The Insect Drones | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Nature spent millions of years perfecting flapping-wing flight. Now engineers can reproduce it with machines.
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