Biomimicry
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Nature inspired innovation
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Cuttlefish's Shifting Colors Could Be Reproduced in 'Artificial Skin'

Cuttlefish's Shifting Colors Could Be Reproduced in 'Artificial Skin' | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The shifting colors on the skin of cuttlefish and other cephalopods could lead to bio-inspired camouflage and signalling, researchers say.
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Color-Changing Cuttlefish Inspire Green TV Screens

Color-Changing Cuttlefish Inspire Green TV Screens | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Cuttlefish are camouflage experts that can change skin color in under a second to hide from predators, or prey on others. They're inspiring more than just awe from scientists. Now researchers at MIT are working on electronic screens and ink that use less than one hundredth the energy of traditional screens--all modeled on the color-changing abilities of cuttlefish.

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Electronic Paper Displays: Kindles and Cuttlefish: Biomimetics Informs e-paper Displays

Electronic Paper Displays: Kindles and Cuttlefish: Biomimetics Informs e-paper Displays | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Both electronic paper (e-paper) and certain biological organisms share the need for adaptive, reflective surfaces to communicate information. The goal of each is to use numerous colors, textures, polarization, and contrast variations without optical losses in order to maximize and control (in an energy-efficient way) the desired physical appearance. Recognizing these display commonalities, researchers at the University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH), the USA Marine Biological Laboratory (Woods Hole, MA), the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Dayton, OH), and the Army Research Laboratory (Adelphi, MD) are attempting to merge the knowledge base of biomimetics used for biological adaptive coloration and appearance (with a focus on cephalopods such as squid, cuttlefish, and octopus) and synthetic reflective e-paper displays (such as Amazon’s Kindle and the Sony Reader) using a series of scientific metrics

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