Biomimicry
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Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
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Coconuts Can Inspire Us to Make Stronger Buildings

Coconuts Can Inspire Us to Make Stronger Buildings | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Coconut palms can grow as high as 30m, and when the ripe fruits fall to the ground their walls must protect them from splitting open. To protect the internal seed, coconuts have a structure of three layers which allow them to withstand heavy impacts. The university’s Plant Biomechanics Group believes this specialised structure could be applied in architecture, and has been working with civil engineers and material scientists to develop this idea as part of a programme called Biological Design and Integrative Structures. [...] The group found that the ladder-like design of vessels in the coconut’s inner endocarp layer “dissipates energy via crack deflection," meaning newly-developed cracks created by an impact don't run directly through the hard shell, but are diverted and stop before the crack separates the fruit. "

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With This Self-Healing Concrete, Buildings Repair Themselves

With This Self-Healing Concrete, Buildings Repair Themselves | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A concrete developed by Dutch scientists and embedded with limestone-producing bacteria is ready to hit the market
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Astonishing Water-sensitive Building Material Acts Just Like Pine Cones

Astonishing Water-sensitive Building Material Acts Just Like Pine Cones | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Royal College of Art design student Chao Chen has developed a revolutionary new building material that responds to the presence of water. After observing the hydro-sensitive behavior of pine cones, which open and close depending upon their exposure to water, Chen has developed a wood laminate material that similarly bends and flexes in response to atmospheric humidity, soil moisture or rain. Applications for the technology include shelters that seal up when it rains and building cladding that opens to let in more light on a dull, drizzly day but closes to block out heat when the weather is hot and dry."

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Urban Infrastructure: What Would Nature Do?

Urban Infrastructure: What Would Nature Do? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"When urban infrastructure meets nature’s designers, amazing things can happen. More and more, biomimicry is being thought of as a way to reconsider the ways we build and operate cities. Today, these lessons are being actively applied in the realm of urban infrastructure and design in an effort to make places that are more sustainable, more livable, more intuitively designed and, at their core, more natural."

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Understanding the Basic Principles of Organic Design

Understanding the Basic Principles of Organic Design | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"In recent years, architects, biologists, and engineers have been thinking about the possible connection the architectural field can have with living entities, such as insects or trees. Most of the time, architects design projects based on the imitation of natural forms. This imitation takes place in a field where there haven’t been previous studies about the organism being imitated, its basic organic functions, and its interaction with the environment. This concept is called biomorphism.

 

When you add in concepts such as biomimicry and biomimetics as theoretical foundations, the design process is focused on the understanding of the functions of the project, how its functions and structure can be solved by studying a specific organism, and, in some supported research projects, how it can be built with parametric design."

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Laurence's curator insight, November 4, 2014 3:05 AM

La nature est belle, l'imiter pour son esthétisme est une bonne idée. La beauté apaise.

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University of Stuttgart Unveils Woven Pavilion Based on Beetle Shells

University of Stuttgart Unveils Woven Pavilion Based on Beetle Shells | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A robotically woven carbon-fibre pavilion based on the lightweight shell encasing a beetle's wings and abdomen is revealed by the University of Stuttgart.
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5 Projects Which Mimic Nature. Which is Your Favourite?

5 Projects Which Mimic Nature. Which is Your Favourite? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Imagine a concert hall of coral rising like Atlantis from the sea. Or a data centre in the side of a mountain, complete with Bond villain subterranean lake. Exploration Architecture has produced designs for a restaurant on Old Street roundabout, and even started farming in the desert, but which is your favourite? The designs are all ‘biomimetic’ solutions; they all have mimicked nature to solve a human design problem. " 

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This Amazing High-Rise Apartment Building Looks Like A Giant Tree

This Amazing High-Rise Apartment Building Looks Like A Giant Tree | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
With balconies budding like leaves, no one could complain for lack of outdoor space in this building in France.
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Mercedes Jahn's curator insight, March 30, 2014 1:03 PM

No words needed ...

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HOK Uses Biomimicry to Inspire Master Plan for Brunei Capital City

HOK Uses Biomimicry to Inspire Master Plan for Brunei Capital City | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"HOK’s 2035 master plan for Bandar Seri Begawan in Brunei looks to the city’s original water-driven form for future inspiration. [...] The city rests at the intersection of three rivers, and is surrounded by the Borneo rainforest, but has suffered from a lack of cohesive direction."

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Qatar Sprouts a Towering Cactus Skyscraper

Qatar Sprouts a Towering Cactus Skyscraper | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The Minister of Municipal Affairs & Agriculture (MMAA) in Qatar is getting a brand new office building that takes the form of a towering cactus. Designed by Bangkok-based Aesthetics Architects, the modern office and adjoining botanical dome take cues from cacti and the way that they successfully survive in hot, dry environments."

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From High-Rise to Low Impact: A Building That Mimics a Forest

From High-Rise to Low Impact: A Building That Mimics a Forest | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"It’s nearly 100 feet tall, fed by the sun and rain that fall on it, and is composed largely of wood. But it’s not a tree. It’s the world’s greenest office building.

The Bullitt Center, finished in the summer of 2013 and located on the edge of Seattle’s downtown, is designed to mimic the Douglas fir forests that once stood on the site."

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Borrowing From Nature

"Architets have long taken inspiration from nature. In ancient Egypt columns were modelled on palm trees and lotus plants, and building designers have borrowed the shapes and proportions of natural forms ever since as they strived to achieve aesthetic perfection. Some architects now believe that such biomimicry has more to offer than simply making buildings look good. They are copying functional systems found in nature to provide cooling, generate energy and even to desalinate water. And they insist that doing these things using biomimetic designs is not just a gimmick, but makes financial sense."

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MIT Researchers to 3D Print a Pavilion by Imitating Silkworms

MIT Researchers to 3D Print a Pavilion by Imitating Silkworms | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
MIT researchers headed by Mediated Matter Group founder Neri Oxman to 3D print a pavilion by imitating silkworms.
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Sam McCormick's curator insight, March 20, 2013 9:08 AM

This article relates to possible techniques for large scale 3D printing of self supporting structures for architectural applications. If this proves a cost effective method of creating extremely strong, lightweight materials, it could be applied to prosthetics, exoskeletons and the casings of implant peripherals that need to be carried by the host.

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Learning From Nature: Architects and Biomimicry

Learning From Nature: Architects and Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

From creating breathable metals to copying how animals cool their homes, architects and designers are increasingly using the principles of biomimicry in their work. Christopher DeWolf takes a look at how the discipline is evolving.

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Wooden Orchids

Wooden Orchids | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The Orchid, a source of life and symbol of sustainability and fecundity, is the inspiration for the shopping mall ‘Wooden Orchids’ designed by architect Vincent Callebaut. On the southern shore of the Yangtze river in China, Wooden Orchids is designed as an innovative solution to the main socio-economic problem – the rural exodus into super cities which causes undue stress on city resources. The project aims to create a new eco-responsible shopping and rich cultural experience, while maintaining it as a tourist destination that combines passive bioclimatic principles and renewable energy technology to assure 70 per cent energy saving.

Based on biomimicry, the architecture of the shopping hub is directly inspired by the petals of an orchid flower and designed as repetition of a basic designed module. The site is divided into two lots, each in proportions of the golden section 1:1.618. The natural order of Fibonacci numbers, observed everywhere in nature, has been adopted to develop the hierarchy and flow of spaces and places, representing the right balance between solid and void, between shadow and light."

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AskNature's curator insight, July 10, 2015 11:52 AM

The biomimicry analogue is pretty loose here, but the resulting structure and reasoning are striking nonetheless.

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Building Cities Like Forests: When Biomimicry Meets Urban Design

Building Cities Like Forests: When Biomimicry Meets Urban Design | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"During the last century and a half, humans have created cities that ignore natural cycles such as the weather and surrounding conditions, and have developed urban areas that have little to do with life in the natural world. The control of resources and mastery of energy sources has allowed us to become carelessly independent from our natural environment—which has led to a downward unsustainable path, currently incapable of supporting the massive population growth predicted for the world’s biggest cities. [...] Nature is holding sustainable solutions to numerous city design and development problems we are currently facing—we just have to look deeper to see where the solutions are already being applied in the natural world."

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What Your Bones Have in Common With the Eiffel Tower

What Your Bones Have in Common With the Eiffel Tower | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The Eiffel Tower weighs less than the air around it. It achieves this by exploiting the same structural ideas that make your bones so strong yet so light.
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Hydroceramic Walls Could Cool Buildings By Sweating Like Human Skin

Hydroceramic Walls Could Cool Buildings By Sweating Like Human Skin | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Our reliance on air conditioning, however magical an innovation, has become a serious environmental burden. Which is why researchers in Barcelona designed a material they say can naturally cool rooms by about 5 degrees Celsius, using a moisture-absorbing polymer that "sweats" much like our own body.
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Biomimicry Inspires Squid-like Building - Green Building Elements

Biomimicry Inspires Squid-like Building - Green Building Elements | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The Biotic-Tech Skyscraper City uses biomimicry and is inspired by squid, using transparency, flexibility, movement and protective pigmentation.
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Achim Menges Developes Hygroskin and Hygroscope: Biomimetic Meteorosensitive Pavilions

Achim Menges Developes Hygroskin and Hygroscope: Biomimetic Meteorosensitive Pavilions | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Research on the spruce cone has led to a complex skin system that responds to localized climatic environments through the natural, mechanical properties of wood and humidity."

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The Termite and the Architect

The Termite and the Architect | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"In  1991, the multinational Old Mutual investment group approached the Zimbabwean architect Mick Pearce with an audacious assignment. The group wished to construct a retail and office complex called the Eastgate Centre in Zimbabwe’s capital city of Harare that, at 55,000 square meters, would be the country’s largest commercial building. What Old Mutual didn’t wish to do was pay the high cost of air-conditioning such a massive space. Could Pearce, working with the Arup construction firm, devise a design that relied solely on passive, natural climate  control? Pondering the problem, Pearce found inspiration in the termite mounds that dotted the savannas across his country. "

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Coastal Resilience Through Biomimicry

Coastal Resilience Through Biomimicry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The resort town of Blackpool on the UK’s northeast coast is a classic example of what can go wrong when you work against natural coastline dynamics. It was built on a sand dune, which, as the town expanded, the Victorians replaced with a monumental 10-meter/30-foot-high seawall. This severed the town from its main asset, its beach, and as competition grew from continental European destinations, Blackpool fell into economic decline. To make matters worse, by the early 2000s the seawall was failing to hold back increasingly stormy winter seas, which began to flood the town. The solution has been to learn from the dunes. The high wall has been replaced with a gently sloping set of steps stretching the length of the town, mimicking the incline of sand dunes to dissipate wave energy.."

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5 Smart Building Skins That Breathe, Farm Energy, and Gobble Up Toxins

5 Smart Building Skins That Breathe, Farm Energy, and Gobble Up Toxins | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Technically speaking, the smart facade-or building envelope that adapts to environmental conditions-dates back to the first window. But the contemporary idea of the smart facade has only been around for a few short decades, helped along by recent advances in chemical and material science. And over the past three years, we've seen the category boom. Below, check out some of the most interesting building facades to come across the screen in recent years: From a thermal metal screen that curls up when it's hot, to a titanium dioxide-covered wall that scrubs the air of pollutants."

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Opportunities in Biomimicry Await in Function, Not Just Form

Opportunities in Biomimicry Await in Function, Not Just Form | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Rather than simply aping nature's physical appearance, architects and designers are finding inspiration and potential revenue streams by studying nature's systems and materials.
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Termite Technology to Shape New ‘Breathing’ Buildings

Termite Technology to Shape New ‘Breathing’ Buildings | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers are investigating how termite mounds can be used to shape future buildings which feature walls that breathe as part of a major new international study involving Nottingham Trent University (UK). The $1.35millon project will examine how the unique structure of the termite mound enables stale and fresh air to be exchanged while maintaining a comfortable level of temperature. Described as a lung by the researchers, the termite mound is the only habitat known in the animal kingdom to have been proven to exchange oxygen and carbon dioxide without losing heat, which enables termites to live in harsh climates they could not otherwise inhabit. One of the ultimate aims of the project is to create buildings which feature walls that breathe in the same way and reduce the need for central heating or air conditioning."

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