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Camouflage Sheet Inspired by Octopus

Camouflage Sheet Inspired by Octopus | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Based on the camouflage abilities of octopuses and cuttlefish, engineers in the US have built a flexible material that changes colour to match its surroundings. The new design features a grid of 1mm cells, containing a temperature-driven dye that switches colour on demand."

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Hummingbirds are the 'Jewels of the Jungle' Yet Their Iridescent Plumes are Pigment Free

Hummingbirds are the 'Jewels of the Jungle' Yet Their Iridescent Plumes are Pigment Free | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Beating its tiny wings up to 80 times a second a hummingbird will dart from flower to flower, its iridescent plumage dazzling in the tropical sun. But these busy birds are con artists. Their feathers are pigment-free, the colours the product of microscopic structures that refract sunlight like a prism, spraying out its reds, blues and greens."

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TED Conferences Use Security Technology Inspired by Butterflies

TED Conferences Use Security Technology Inspired by Butterflies | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The TED2014 conference kicks off today in Vancouver, marking the 30th anniversary of the event. The theme of this year's conference is "the next chapter," and each attendee will receive a sample of what could be the next chapter in anti-counterfeit technology. The TED2014 ID badges feature a small iridescent panel with a "30 years TED" logo. The image isn't a hologram, but is created by billions of nano-scale holes. The technology is inspired by the wings of the Morpho butterfly, and this is one of its first major real-world applications. The super-tiny holes reflect and transmit light in a distinctive way, making the logo easy to identify and hard to copy."

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Smartwatch Uses Bio-ispired Mirasol Display Technology

Smartwatch Uses Bio-ispired Mirasol Display Technology | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The Mirasol display technology (developed by Qualcomm) is based on biomimetics - that is, technology that imitates nature. The natural phenomenon that makes a butterfly’s wings or a peacock’s feathers shimmer and give off their rich, striking colors is the same exact quality that drives how Mirasol displays generate color. How do butterflies and peacocks do it? Through microscopic structures on their wings and feathers they are each able to create truly vivid colors simply by causing light to interfere with itself. This "interference" is the reason the term "interferometric" comes into play."

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Harnessing The Power Of Peacocks To Make Colorful Images

Harnessing The Power Of Peacocks To Make Colorful Images | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The gloriously colored, iridescent feathers of the male peacock aren't what they seem on the surface. They look that way largely because the feathers contain nanometer-scale protein structures that break up incoming light waves, recombine and reflect them as rich, vibrant colors. Scientists at the University of Michigan think they have a technology that emulates this process to display pictures without chemicals or electrical power. Eventually, the technology could replace the displays now used on smartphones, tablets, and computer screens, with strikingly high definition."

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Russ Roberts's curator insight, June 11, 2013 8:41 AM

This discovery could change the way we view images on our tablets, cell phones, and computer screens.  There may be some amateur radio applications here.  Aloha de KH6JRM.

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Bioinspired Fibers Change Color When Stretched

Bioinspired Fibers Change Color When Stretched | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A team of materials scientists at Harvard University and the University of Exeter, UK, have invented a new fiber that changes color when stretched. Inspired by nature, the researchers identified and replicated the unique structural elements that create the bright iridescent blue color of a tropical plant’s fruit."

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Electronic Paper Displays: Kindles and Cuttlefish: Biomimetics Informs e-paper Displays

Electronic Paper Displays: Kindles and Cuttlefish: Biomimetics Informs e-paper Displays | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Both electronic paper (e-paper) and certain biological organisms share the need for adaptive, reflective surfaces to communicate information. The goal of each is to use numerous colors, textures, polarization, and contrast variations without optical losses in order to maximize and control (in an energy-efficient way) the desired physical appearance. Recognizing these display commonalities, researchers at the University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH), the USA Marine Biological Laboratory (Woods Hole, MA), the Air Force Research Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Dayton, OH), and the Army Research Laboratory (Adelphi, MD) are attempting to merge the knowledge base of biomimetics used for biological adaptive coloration and appearance (with a focus on cephalopods such as squid, cuttlefish, and octopus) and synthetic reflective e-paper displays (such as Amazon’s Kindle and the Sony Reader) using a series of scientific metrics

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Color-Changing Cuttlefish Inspire Green TV Screens

Color-Changing Cuttlefish Inspire Green TV Screens | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Cuttlefish are camouflage experts that can change skin color in under a second to hide from predators, or prey on others. They're inspiring more than just awe from scientists. Now researchers at MIT are working on electronic screens and ink that use less than one hundredth the energy of traditional screens--all modeled on the color-changing abilities of cuttlefish.

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Brightly Colored Bird Feathers Inspire New Kind of Laser

Brightly Colored Bird Feathers Inspire New Kind of Laser | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

A new kind of laser captures light just like some colorful bird feathers. The device mimics the nanoscale structure of colorful feathers to make high-intensity laser light with almost any color.

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Bio-inspiration Transforming Cosmetics: Consumer Awareness Rising

Bio-inspiration Transforming Cosmetics: Consumer Awareness Rising | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Industry and consumer awareness of biomimetics is on the rise as demand for naturals continues to climb, with the combination of science and nature increasingly appealing for skin care products. 
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'Chameleon' Crystals Could Camouflage Clothing and Cars

'Chameleon' Crystals Could Camouflage Clothing and Cars | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
"Just as a chameleon can instantly morph its skin color to match its surroundings, a new method of controlling crystals using light and chemistry could make clothing or cars change color on demand. The method involves shining a laser on tiny latex particles to make them assume a 3-D crystalline shape or pattern, such as a letter M. When the laser is switched on or off, the crystals appear or disappear."
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Study Offers Insights into Unique Color Vision of Mantis Shrimp

Study Offers Insights into Unique Color Vision of Mantis Shrimp | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"New research conducted by marine biologists reveals that the mantis shrimp Haptosquilla trispinosa uses a unique color vision system. [...] «Modern cameras struggle with the amount of data they take in due to increased pixel numbers. Maybe there is a more efficient way and the bio-inspiration provided by the shrimp could be the answer», Ms Thoen [lead author of study] concluded."

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Deciphering Butterflies' Designer Colors: Findings Could Inspire New Hue-changing Materials

Deciphering Butterflies' Designer Colors: Findings Could Inspire New Hue-changing Materials | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Butterfly wings can do remarkable things with light, and humans are still trying to learn from them. Physicists have now uncovered how subtle differences in the tiny crystals of butterfly wings create stunningly varied patterns of color even among closely related species. The discovery, reported today in the Optical Society's (OSA) open-access journal Optical Materials Express, could lead to new coatings for manufactured materials that could change color by design, if researchers can figure out how to replicate the wings' light-manipulating properties."

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Butterflies Inspire Anti-Counterfeit Technology

Butterflies Inspire Anti-Counterfeit Technology | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
"A Canadian company is fighting counterfeiters by employing one of the most sophisticated structures in nature: a butterfly wing. To be precise, Nanotech Security Corp. in Vancouver is using the natural structure of the wings of a Morpho butterfly, a South American insect famous for its bright, iridescent blue or green wings, to create a visual image that would be practically impossible to counterfeit. The technology was developed at British Columbia’s Simon Fraser University, and licensed to the company."
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Dragons Colour Study Could Fuel Breakthroughs

Dragons Colour Study Could Fuel Breakthroughs | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The CSIRO is hoping a new Australian study of native bearded dragons could lead to breakthroughs in medicine and the gathering solar energy.
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Squishy Robots Change Color, Glow

Squishy Robots Change Color, Glow | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A squishy robot inspired by the octopus and squid can change color and even glow in the dark.
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Radiant Light Film: Learning to Make Rainbows from Butterflies

Radiant Light Film: Learning to Make Rainbows from Butterflies | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Radiant light film contains no metal whatsoever, so it’s non-corroding, thermally stable, non-conductive, and won’t produce electro-magnetic interference; it’s a well-mannered material that manages to create a striking effect with a minimum of fuss. Taking a cue from butterfly wings, the colors in the film are created NOT through the use of pigments but rather through a series of microscopic ridges spaced a few hundred nanometers apart. Variations in the spacing of the ridges produce a range of colors (blue to magenta to gold) though the reflection and interference of different wavelengths of light, and as a result the material appears to change hue as you adjust your viewing angle.

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