Biomimicry
46.1K views | +34 today
Follow
Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Swans Help Create Smoother Camera Drone Videos

Swans Help Create Smoother Camera Drone Videos | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The next time you see a graceful, dramatic video shot by a camera drone, you may have a swan to thank for the absence of any jittery footage. Stanford University researchers aredeveloping camera suspension technology inspired by whooping swans, whose heads remain remarkably still even when they're making aggressive in-flight maneuvers. Thanks to a blend of high-speed video and computer modeling, the scientists discovered that the swan's neck acts much like a vehicle's suspension, passively countering the effects of flapping wings or headwinds."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Study Offers Insights into Unique Color Vision of Mantis Shrimp

Study Offers Insights into Unique Color Vision of Mantis Shrimp | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"New research conducted by marine biologists reveals that the mantis shrimp Haptosquilla trispinosa uses a unique color vision system. [...] «Modern cameras struggle with the amount of data they take in due to increased pixel numbers. Maybe there is a more efficient way and the bio-inspiration provided by the shrimp could be the answer», Ms Thoen [lead author of study] concluded."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

A Camera That Sees Like the Human Eye

"The retina is an enormously powerful tool. It sorts through massive amounts of data while operating on only a fraction of the power that a conventional digital camera and computer would require to do the same task. Now, engineers at a company called iniLabs in Switzerland are applying lessons from biology in an effort to build a more efficient digital camera inspired by the human retina."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Bug's Eye Inspires Hemispherical Digital Camera That Delivers Unmatched Field of View

Bug's Eye Inspires Hemispherical Digital Camera That Delivers Unmatched Field of View | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Inspired by the complex fly eye, an interdisciplinary team led by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Northwestern University has developed a hemispherical digital camera with nearly 200 tiny lenses, delivering exceptionally wide-angle field of view and sharp images."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Shrimp's Eyes Inspire New Cancer-detecting Camera

Shrimp's Eyes Inspire New Cancer-detecting Camera | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Shrimps' eyes have been revealed as the latest weapon against cancer, with their unique vision set to be adapted to diagnostic cameras. University of Queensland research has found the shrimps' compound eyes were able to detect polarised light, which could be mimicked to detect cancer cells."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

Insect-Eye Camera Offers Wide-Angle Vision for Tiny Drones

Insect-Eye Camera Offers Wide-Angle Vision for Tiny Drones | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Entomologists study insects known for their hard exoskeletons, jointed appendages, segmented bodies, bilateral symmetry and antennae. But perhaps the most impressive part of an insect is its lateral compound eyes. Scientists wishing to study insects have over 1 million species to select from!

Insect eyes are so impressive scientist and researcher John Rogers of the Science Research Group at Urbana-Champaign, University of Illinois, is designing miniature drones cameras based on their unique design. The big challenge for engineers is to build a drone camera with a 180° range of vision and clear vision throughout that line of sight. Insects have this ability when born."

more...
Sieg Holle's curator insight, January 3, 2014 9:30 AM

tech breakthrough?

 

Scooped by Miguel Prazeres
Scoop.it!

The Artificial Insect Eye That Will Give Sight To Tiny Drones

The Artificial Insect Eye That Will Give Sight To Tiny Drones | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Humans see the world through a pair of high resolution, single lens eyes that allow us to adjust focus and pinpoint fine details. But simpler creatures, like insects, instead rely on compound eyes that have lower resolution but offer a much wider distortion-free field-of-view that's actually better suited for lightning fast motion perception. And as researchers work towards designing autonomous drones that will behave like futuristic artificial bugs, it's only fitting that they also work to replicate how an insect sees.

more...
No comment yet.