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Biomimetics: the Nature as a Source of Inspiration for A350 XWB Design.

Biomimetics: the Nature as a Source of Inspiration for A350 XWB Design. | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
"[...] In a macroscopic axis, the A350 XWB considers the actively deformation of the surfaces to provide the best aerodynamic performance and control of load for each flight conditions; takeoff, climb, cruise, approach, landing, maneuver, turbulence-encounters, etc. This is what birds, fish and marine mammals perform beautifully, called "morphing".  The idea is to move from a 'rigid' world to flexibility and adaptation technologies."
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Bio-inspired Unmanned Aircraft Capable of Soaring Like Birds

Bio-inspired Unmanned Aircraft Capable of Soaring Like Birds | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Researchers are developing a bio-inspired unmanned aircraft capable of soaring like birds, boosting energy efficiency and endurance. The research team is aiming to be the first in the world to demonstrate an autonomous unmanned aircraft that can mimic birds by using updrafts around buildings to stay airborne.
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Bird-friendly Glass Makes UK Debut

Bird-friendly Glass Makes UK Debut | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Glass manufacturer looks to biomimicry for design inspiration. A lookout tower in Lindisfarne is the first UK building to use a new glazing designed to save the lives of birds. Each year millions of birds die by crashing into glazed buildings but Ornilux – a new glazing developed by German manufacturer Arnold Glas – is intended to make the lookout tower and visitor centre at Lindisfarne bird-friendly.

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Taking Cues from Birds to Green the Airline Industry

Taking Cues from Birds to Green the Airline Industry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

A team of doctoral students from the Aeronautics and Astronautics program at Stanford University conceptualized a way for commercial planes to save fuel by flying in formation. “In principle, the idea of flying aircraft in formation is the same as for migrating birds,” said Tristan Flanzer, one of the team members. “While in formation, birds experience lower drag and therefore can fly further. Aircrafts can take advantage of the same principles to reduce their drag."

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Technology Unlocks the Mysteries of Bird Flight

Technology Unlocks the Mysteries of Bird Flight | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
As long as there have been people watching birds, there have been theories as to how and why they do what they do. In the modern era, theories about why birds flock and why they migrate in v-formations have abounded, yet answers have been few. But new research using creative technology on both starling murmurations and bald ibis’ migration reveals that complex flight dynamics and rapid-fire adjustments based on sensory feedback previously believed impossible for birds are indeed occurring.
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Birds' V Formation Mystery 'Solved'

Birds' V Formation Mystery 'Solved' | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The mystery of why so many birds fly in a V formation may have been solved. Scientists from the Royal Veterinary College fitted data loggers to a flock of rare birds that were being trained to migrate by following a microlight. This revealed that the birds flew in the optimal position - gaining lift from the bird in front by remaining close to its wingtip. The study, published in the journal Nature, also showed that the birds timed their wing beats."

Miguel Prazeres's insight:

Flying commercial planes in formation much like birds do has been conceptualized as a way to save fuel by flying in formation: http://www.triplepundit.com/2009/08/taking-cues-from-birds-to-green-the-airline-industry/

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Grasping Concept Modelled on a Bird's Beak

Grasping Concept Modelled on a Bird's Beak | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

The PowerGripper [tool] is modelled on the complex kinematics of the bird’s beak. In mechanical terms, this is known as Watt’s linkage.

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