Biomimicry
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Nature inspired innovation
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How Birds are Helping Airbus Build Quieter Planes

How Birds are Helping Airbus Build Quieter Planes | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The habits and anatomy of birds are being used by boffins at Airbus to develop quieter and more fuel efficient planes. The aviation giant, which makes and designs wings in Broughton, Flintshire, and Filton, Gloucestershire, employs Professor Norman Wood to unlock the mysteries of the natural world to help gain a commercial advantage. 
It is using so-called ‘biomimicry’ in the design of intelligent wings that react automatically to the environment, just as an eagle’s or a peregrine falcon’s do."

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Innovative by Nature: Airbus Establishes a Company-wide Network for Bionics Projects

Innovative by Nature: Airbus Establishes a Company-wide Network for Bionics Projects | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Airbus believes that much can be learned by studying the natural world, and in putting this philosophy into practice as a global innovation leader, the company has launched numerous projects inspired by biological systems and methods in order to develop new technical solutions. [...] One bionics project at Airbus seeks a new method for stiffening surfaces by leveraging physical qualities of the Victoria water lily (Victoria amazonica) – which has intrigued engineers with its superior ability to support significant point loads. The plant’s leaf vein structure provides Airbus with a model for reinforcing surfaces, and can now be found on the inner surface of a 3D-printed aircraft spoiler drawn up as part of a concept study." 

 
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Technology Unlocks the Mysteries of Bird Flight

Technology Unlocks the Mysteries of Bird Flight | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
As long as there have been people watching birds, there have been theories as to how and why they do what they do. In the modern era, theories about why birds flock and why they migrate in v-formations have abounded, yet answers have been few. But new research using creative technology on both starling murmurations and bald ibis’ migration reveals that complex flight dynamics and rapid-fire adjustments based on sensory feedback previously believed impossible for birds are indeed occurring.
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Antennae Help Flies "Cruise" In Gusty Winds

Antennae Help Flies "Cruise" In Gusty Winds | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Caltech researchers uncover a mechanism for how fruit flies regulate their flight speed, using both vision and wind-sensing information from their antennae.
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Bees no Drones When it Comes to Landing

Bees no Drones When it Comes to Landing | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Australian neuroscientists studying bees' flight have uncovered a surprisingly simple guidance strategy which could be used by drones, stealth fighters and even spacecraft. Experiments at the Australian National University revealed that bees land safely by ensuring that the surface they are approaching expands at a constant rate within their field of vision."

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Albatross's Effortless Flight Decoded—May Influence Future Planes

Albatross's Effortless Flight Decoded—May Influence Future Planes | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Aerospace engineers may have finally figured out how albatrosses go so far without flapping, and the findings could shape future planes.
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Studying Owls to Improve Aircraft

Studying Owls to Improve Aircraft | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Many owls have the extraordinary ability to fly in almost complete silence. Could this adaptation have implications for the way we design aircraft?

 

Photo details: Snowy Owl, Saint Barthelemy, Near Montreal, Quebec. Copyright © 2010, Alan D. Wilson. http://www.naturespicsonline.com

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Yves Bonis's curator insight, December 9, 2014 3:51 AM

Le vol silencieux des hiboux a déjà inspiré le Shinkansen - le "TGV" japonais. Il pourrait bien aider également l'aviation...

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Biomimetics: the Nature as a Source of Inspiration for A350 XWB Design.

Biomimetics: the Nature as a Source of Inspiration for A350 XWB Design. | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
"[...] In a macroscopic axis, the A350 XWB considers the actively deformation of the surfaces to provide the best aerodynamic performance and control of load for each flight conditions; takeoff, climb, cruise, approach, landing, maneuver, turbulence-encounters, etc. This is what birds, fish and marine mammals perform beautifully, called "morphing".  The idea is to move from a 'rigid' world to flexibility and adaptation technologies."
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Marcelo Errera's curator insight, July 10, 2015 10:42 AM

The design evolution process never ends. There are some robust associations between features that guide the designs which live longer. 

 

In other words, the best design today will eventually be replaced by tomorrow's  best of "de jour".

 

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Eagle's Wings Inspire More Fuel Efficient Planes

Eagle's Wings Inspire More Fuel Efficient Planes | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"[...] The wing tips of steppe eagles are an ideal shape to maximize lift with a minimal wingspan. The curvature at the end of the wing reduces drag. Engineers designing the A380 copied that design, resulting in fuel savings of up to 3%, depending on if it is a long or short distance flight."

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Birds' V Formation Mystery 'Solved'

Birds' V Formation Mystery 'Solved' | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The mystery of why so many birds fly in a V formation may have been solved. Scientists from the Royal Veterinary College fitted data loggers to a flock of rare birds that were being trained to migrate by following a microlight. This revealed that the birds flew in the optimal position - gaining lift from the bird in front by remaining close to its wingtip. The study, published in the journal Nature, also showed that the birds timed their wing beats."

Miguel Prazeres's insight:

Flying commercial planes in formation much like birds do has been conceptualized as a way to save fuel by flying in formation: http://www.triplepundit.com/2009/08/taking-cues-from-birds-to-green-the-airline-industry/

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Airbus and Biomimicry: Nature Inspired Aviation

Airbus and Biomimicry: Nature Inspired Aviation | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"What do velvet, the skin of a shark, and advancements in aircraft aerodynamics have in common? The answer rests in a field of scientific study that involves examining what can be extracted, learned and duplicated from the natural world. Known as ‘biomimicry,” or biologically inspired engineering, this is the study and imitation of nature’s best ideas to help solve human challenges. A growing number of aeronautical innovations have been inspired by an array of natural structures, organs and materials – and these tried and tested patterns of the natural world will continue to be a powerful source of inspiration in the future." 

 

Photo details: Bald Eagle , Morris Valley Road, Harrison Mills, British ColumbiaCopyright © 2008, Alan D. Wilson. http://www.naturespicsonline.com

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Taking Cues from Birds to Green the Airline Industry

Taking Cues from Birds to Green the Airline Industry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

A team of doctoral students from the Aeronautics and Astronautics program at Stanford University conceptualized a way for commercial planes to save fuel by flying in formation. “In principle, the idea of flying aircraft in formation is the same as for migrating birds,” said Tristan Flanzer, one of the team members. “While in formation, birds experience lower drag and therefore can fly further. Aircrafts can take advantage of the same principles to reduce their drag."

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