Biomimicry
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Getting a Grip on Mussel Adhesion

Getting a Grip on Mussel Adhesion | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The Asian green mussel (Perna viridis) anchors itself underwater by timed secretion of adhesive proteins from threadlike foot extensions, a team of researchers in Singapore finds1.

Lab experiments and computer simulations reveal that an especially long sticky protein acts as a primer — first catching the surface and repelling water molecules to make way for two proteins that form the final adhesive pad.

The discovery could lead to new submersible glues or improved paints to prevent biofouling on ship hulls and drilling platforms.
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'Gecko Grippers' Head to Space Station

'Gecko Grippers' Head to Space Station | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket loaded with supplies and science experiments blasted off from Florida on Tuesday, boosting an Orbital ATK cargo capsule toward the International Space Station.[...] Perched on top of the rocket was a Cygnus capsule loaded with nearly 7,500 pounds (3,400 kg) of food, science experiments and equipment including a 3-D printer to build tools for astronauts and non-stick grippers modeled after gecko feet.[...] The experimental Gecko Gripper is a new kind of adhesive that mimics the way gecko lizards cling to surfaces without falling. It aims to test a method of attaching things in the weightless environment of space. NASA is looking at robotic versions of gecko feet to attach sensors and other instruments onto and inside satellites.

Photo details: Leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), George Chernilevsky,2009. Wikimedia Commons, public domain.
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Nature’s Strongest Super-Glue Comes Unstuck

Nature’s Strongest Super-Glue Comes Unstuck | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"An international team of scientists led by Newcastle University, UK, and funded by the US Office of Naval Research, have shown for the first time that barnacle larvae release an oily droplet to clear the water from surfaces before sticking down using a phosphoprotein adhesive."

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Flypaper for Elephants: A New Adhesive is Based on Geckos' Feet

Flypaper for Elephants: A New Adhesive is Based on Geckos' Feet | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A team of scientists at the University of Massachusetts has developed a new, reusable adhesive based on the feet of the gecko – the lizard that licks its own eyeballs and climbs up walls. Around 60% of gecko species have adhesive toe pads and these pads were the inspiration for Geckskin – a device that can attach and detach from materials and surfaces repeatedly."

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Scientists of Kiel University Unravel Widespread Natural Adhesion System

Scientists of Kiel University Unravel Widespread Natural Adhesion System | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Adhesion is an extremely important factor in living nature: insects can climb up walls, plants can twine up them, and cells are able to adhere to surfaces. During evolution, many of them developed mushroom-shaped adhesive structures and organs. Lars Heepe and his colleagues at Kiel University have discovered why the specific shape is advantageous for adhesion. The answer is in homogeneous stress distribution between a surface and the adhesive element. [...] The findings of the study made in Kiel can be used for further development of glue-free adhesive surfaces with enhanced performance."

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Clingfish’s Super Strong Grip Could Inspire Better Adhesives

Clingfish’s Super Strong Grip Could Inspire Better Adhesives | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"You know that pesky soap holder whose suction cup never stays attached to the shower wall? Scientists may now have a solution: mimic the clingfish.

These fish live in the intertidal zone—the area at the ocean’s edge where waves are constantly crashing against algae-covered rocks. Despite strong currents and even stronger waves, clingfish survive here by using the mechanism that earned them their name: they cling to the rocks with an adhesive disc on their abdomens that is unhindered by rough, slippery or wet surfaces. With this grip engaged, the fish can prey on mollusks attached to the rocks. We’re talking an unstoppable suction that is also fast and reversible."

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Researchers Uncover the Secret Behind Ivy’s Natural Adhesive

Researchers Uncover the Secret Behind Ivy’s Natural Adhesive | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Charles Darwin was the first to observe that Ivy exudes a liquid adhesive that helps it to cling to surfaces. Now researchers at Ohio State University have identified the protein that allows Ivy to stick. Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) allow Ivy’s adhesive to enter nanoscale openings rather than just coating surfaces. Curing takes place due to calcium-driven electrostatic interactions among carboxyl groups of the AGPs and pectic acids. As water evaporates from the adhesive, chemical bonds are formed between adhesive and substrate. The researchers say that their discovery opens up the possibility of applying its findings to the development of adhesives for a wide range of applications ranging from medical adhesives to coatings and even cosmetics."

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Ford Looks to Make its Cars Easier to Recycle with Gecko Inspired Adhesive

Ford Looks to Make its Cars Easier to Recycle with Gecko Inspired Adhesive | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Dearborn, Michigan based car maker, Ford Motor Company, is working with Procter & Gamble to develop an adhesive inspired by geckos to improve the recyclability of its cars. Ford said that its researchers have considered ways to make auto manufacturing more sustainable for years. A key challenge is glue used to adhere foams to plastics and metals can make disassembling parts for recycling nearly impossible.

Enter the gecko. The company explained that the lizard’s toe pads allow it to stick to most surfaces without liquids or surface tension. The reptile can then easily release itself, leaving no residue.  [...] According to Debbie Mielewski, Ford senior technical leader for plastics and sustainability research, the gecko could inspire a host of adhesive innovations for global applications at Ford."

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The Stickiness of Frog Tongues

The Stickiness of Frog Tongues | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
The frog looks nearly asleep, when suddenly its tongue darts out, snaring an unsuspecting insect. What makes its tongue so sticky? Find out...
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One Day We'll Fix Everything With Glues Copied From Mussels, Oysters, And Barnacles

One Day We'll Fix Everything With Glues Copied From Mussels, Oysters, And Barnacles | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"A researcher has figured out a way to take the power of natural glues and make non-toxic and incredibly strong synthetic adhesives. It could help do everything from securing broken bones to manufacturing cars."

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The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Crucifix Toad Teach Us About Adhesives?

The Biomimicry Manual: What Can the Crucifix Toad Teach Us About Adhesives? | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Deep in the Australian desert, the Crucifix Toad finds genius solutions that we can learn from. Glue, medical adhesives, water conservation, and more.
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Adhesion System of Remora Fish May Lead to Bio-Inspired Adhesive

Adhesion System of Remora Fish May Lead to Bio-Inspired Adhesive | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
A new study provides details of the structure and tissue properties of the unique adhesion system used by remora fish to attach themselves to sharks and other marine animals. The information could lead to a new engineered reversible adhesive.
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