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Conférence environnementale : l'économie circulaire pour les nuls - Le Nouvel Observateur

Conférence environnementale : l'économie circulaire pour les nuls - Le Nouvel Observateur | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
Le Nouvel Observateur
Conférence environnementale : l'économie circulaire pour les nuls
Le Nouvel Observateur
L'économie circulaire, qu'est-ce que c'est ?

Via Raphael Souchier
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Raphael Souchier's curator insight, September 22, 2013 10:04 AM

Il est temps de s'y mettre

biomimicry as design strategy
Integrating all of our senses in the exploration of the design strategy found in nature
Curated by Rowan Edwards
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Biomimicry incubators: the business case for conservation

Biomimicry incubators: the business case for conservation | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
The business opportunities found in biomimicry - the application of characteristics found in species to human innovation - makes a strong case for biodiversity...
Rowan Edwards's insight:
Eliminating the old 'story of stuff' and replacing with new is proving hard.
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Toward a sustainable, bio-inspired future

Toward a sustainable, bio-inspired future | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
A dog. A burr. A trip to the Alps. The story of George de Mestral’s invention of Velcro reads like t...
Rowan Edwards's insight:
Biomimicry used to enhance management with ideas of super-organisms is cool. But ultimately it should work towards solving our current "story of stuff" paradigm.
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Toward a sustainable, bio-inspired future

Toward a sustainable, bio-inspired future | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
A dog. A burr. A trip to the Alps. The story of George de Mestral’s invention of Velcro reads like t...
Rowan Edwards's insight:
Biomimicry used to enhance management with ideas of super-organisms is cool. But ultimately it should work towards solving our current "story of stuff" paradigm.
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Lorem ipsum dolor sit er elit lamet, consectetaur cillium adipisicing pecu, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ull... | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
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The "first man-made biological leaf" could enable humans to colonise space

“ RCA graduate Julian Melchiorri says the synthetic biological leaf he developed, which absorbs water and carbon dioxide to produce oxygen just like a plant, could…”
Via Roberto S L Naboni
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Rewilding the Land Can Repair Damage We've Caused and Reconnect Us to the Natural World.

Rewilding the Land Can Repair Damage We've Caused and Reconnect Us to the Natural World. | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
We need to become enchanted with nature again, author says.
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No need for water, enzymes are doing it for themselves even under hydrophobic conditions

No need for water, enzymes are doing it for themselves even under hydrophobic conditions | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
New research by scientists at the University of Bristol has challenged one of the key axioms in biology - that enzymes need water to function. The breakthrough could eventually lead to the development of new industrial catalysts for processing biodiesel.

 

Enzymes are large biological molecules that catalyse thousands of different chemical reactions that are essential for all life, from converting food into energy, to controlling how our cells replicate DNA.

 

Throughout this diverse range of biological environments in which enzymes perform their various roles, the only constant is an abundance of water.

However, new findings published today [6 October] in Nature Communications, show that water is not essential for enzymes to fulfil their biological role.

 

This discovery could pave the way for the development of new thermally robust industrial enzymes that could be utilised in harsh processing conditions, with applications ranging from detergent technologies to alternative energies via biofuel production.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Rowan Edwards's insight:

yet another reason to re-connect with nature. 

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Bloom's revised Taxonomy with verbs! - Infographic

Bloom's revised Taxonomy with verbs! - Infographic | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
“ Need some extra verbs? Here you go! ~Mia”
Via Ana Cristina Pratas, LuizQuaglia
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, June 6, 11:58 AM

Learning and teaching are about action therefore verbs are the appropriate words to bring nouns to life i.e. curriculum.

Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, June 7, 10:51 AM

Cute!

David Swaddle's curator insight, June 16, 11:28 PM

A nice infographic to keep at hand when writing questions and setting learning objectives.

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Artificial membranes form bio-silicon interfaces

Artificial membranes form bio-silicon interfaces | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
A group of scientists in Chile has created* artificial biomembranes, mimicking those found in living organisms on silicon surfaces, a step toward creating bio-silicon interfaces, where biological “sensor” molecules can be printed onto a cheap silicon chip with integrated electronic circuits.Described in The Journal of Chemical Physics from AIP Publishing, the artificial membranes have potential applications such as detecting bacterial contaminants in food, toxic pollution in the environment, and dangerous diseases .The idea is to create a “biosensor that can transmit electrical signals through the membrane,” said María José Retamal, a Ph.D. student at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and first author of the paper.Lipid membranes separate distinct spaces within cells and define walls between neighboring cells — a functional compartmentalization that serves many physiological processes, protecting genetic material, regulating what comes in and out of cells, and maintaining the function of separate organs.Synthetic membranes that mimic nature offer the possibility of containing membrane proteins — biological molecules that could be used for detecting toxins, diseases and many other biosensing applications.More work is needed to standardize the process by which proteins are to be inserted in the membranes, to define the mechanism by which an electrical signal would be transmitted when a protein binds its target, and to calibrate how that signal is detected by the underlying circuitry, Retamal said. -------------------------------------------------------* Retamal and her colleagues created the first artificial membrane without using solvents on a silicon support base. They chose silicon because of its low cost, wide availability and because its “hydrophobicity” (how much it repels water) can be controlled chemically, allowing them to build membranes on top.Next they evaporated a chemical known as chitosan onto the silicon. Chitosan is derived from chitin, a sugar found in the shells of certain crustaceans, like lobsters or shrimp. Whole bags of the powder can be bought from chemical companies worldwide. They chose this ingredient for its ability to form a moisturizing matrix. It is insoluble in water, but chitosan is porous, so it is capable of retaining water.Finally they evaporated a phospholipid molecule known as dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) onto the chitosan-covered silicon substrate and showed that it formed a stable “bilayer,” the classic form of a membrane. Spectroscopy showed that these artificial membranes were stable over a wide range of temperatures.
Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Biomimicry 3D Printed Soft Chair is a Furniture First | Inside3DP.com

Biomimicry 3D Printed Soft Chair is a Furniture First | Inside3DP.com | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
Design student Lilian van Daal has 3D printed a soft chair entirely out of one recyclable material by mimicking plant cells in construction.
Rowan Edwards's insight:

We'd get there faster with more biologists and organic chemists at the design table. Biomimicry as a design solution needs more action at the results table.

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Floating cities: Is the ocean humanity’s next frontier?

Floating cities: Is the ocean humanity’s next frontier? | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it

Floating cities are nothing new. In the early 1960s, Buckminster Fuller designed a city – Triton – that was intended to float off the coast of Tokyo Bay. It was later considered but never commissioned by the US government.

“Three-quarters of our planet Earth is covered with water, most of which may float organic cities,” Fuller explains in his book Critical Path. “Floating cities pay no rent to landlords. They are situated on the water, which they desalinate and recirculate in many useful and non-polluting ways.”

Fifty years on, with heavy pollution causing climate change and rising sea levels, Fuller’s floating city concept is being seriously considered as an antidote to those problems.


Via Lauren Moss
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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, August 7, 11:18 PM

Ciudades flotantes....será la humanidad del océano la próxima frontera?....

Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, August 12, 4:42 AM

With the advent of climate change and sea level rise, such cities may be necessary in the near future.

 

China has may build a floating city. Chinese Construction Company has already has already commissioned plans to test this ambitious project from a smaller scale, beginning in 2015. http://sco.lt/9K70an

 

The eco-friendly project is expected to be self-sufficient, with on-island food production, power generation, and waste management systems. However, there is little information about how food security would be achieved out in the ocean.

 

More scoops on climate change and food security here:

http://www.scoop.it/t/aquascaping-and-nature/?tag=Climate+Change

http://www.scoop.it/t/aquascaping-and-nature?q=food+security

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Animal Printheads, Biomimicry and More: How Nature Will Shape the Built Environment of the Future

Animal Printheads, Biomimicry and More: How Nature Will Shape the Built Environment of the Future | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
© John Becker Biomimicry is quickly emerging as one of the next architectural frontiers. New manufacturing processes such as 3D printing, coupled with

Via Roberto S L Naboni
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Microgrids: They're Kind of a Big Deal

Microgrids: They're Kind of a Big Deal | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
For locals participating in the Pecan Street Demonstration in Austin’s suburban town of Mueller, TX, residential carbon footprint data is about as available as square footage. Their home utility consumption is monitored by the Pecan Street Research Institute at The University of Texas-Austin a

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Biomimicry incubators: the business case for conservation

Biomimicry incubators: the business case for conservation | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
The business opportunities found in biomimicry - the application of characteristics found in species to human innovation - makes a strong case for biodiversity...
Rowan Edwards's insight:
Eliminating the old 'story of stuff' and replacing with new is proving hard.
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Toward a sustainable, bio-inspired future

Toward a sustainable, bio-inspired future | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
A dog. A burr. A trip to the Alps. The story of George de Mestral’s invention of Velcro reads like t...
Rowan Edwards's insight:
Biomimicry used to enhance management with ideas of super-organisms is cool. But ultimately it should work towards solving our current "story of stuff" paradigm.
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Toward a sustainable, bio-inspired future

Toward a sustainable, bio-inspired future | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
A dog. A burr. A trip to the Alps. The story of George de Mestral’s invention of Velcro reads like t...
Rowan Edwards's insight:
Biomimicry used to enhance management with ideas of super-organisms is cool. But ultimately it should work towards solving our current "story of stuff" paradigm.
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Lorem ipsum dolor sit er elit lamet, consectetaur cillium adipisicing pecu, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ull... | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
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Biomimicry: Turning dewdrops into drinking water - FT.com

Biomimicry: Turning dewdrops into drinking water - FT.com | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
Some plants and insects living in deserts have evolved ways to collect precious water directly from fog and dew, a talent that human inhabitants of arid regions surely envy.
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High Efficiency Achieved for Harvesting Hydrogen Fuel From the Sun using Earth-Abundant Materials

High Efficiency Achieved for Harvesting Hydrogen Fuel From the Sun using Earth-Abundant Materials | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it

Today, the journal Science published the latest development in Michael Grätzel’s laboratory at EPFL: producing hydrogen fuel from sunlight and water. By combining a pair of solar cells made with a mineral called perovskite and low cost electrodes, scientists have obtained a 12.3 percent conversion efficiency from solar energy to hydrogen, a record using earth-abundant materials as opposed to rare metals.

The race is on to optimize solar energy’s performance. More efficient silicon photovoltaic panels, dye-sensitized solar cells, concentrated cells and thermodynamic solar plants all pursue the same goal: to produce a maximum amount of electrons from sunlight. Those electrons can then be converted into electricity to turn on lights and power your refrigerator.

At the Laboratory of Photonics and Interfaces at EPFL, led by Michael Grätzel, where scientists invented dye solar cells that mimic photosynthesis in plants, they have also developed methods for generating fuels such as hydrogen through solar water splitting. To do this, they either use photoelectrochemical cells that directly split water into hydrogen and oxygen when exposed to sunlight, or they combine electricity-generating cells with an electrolyzer that separates the water molecules.

By using the latter technique, Grätzel’s post-doctoral student Jingshan Luo and his colleagues were able to obtain a performance so spectacular that their achievement is being published today in the journal Science. Their device converts into hydrogen 12.3 percent of the energy diffused by the sun on perovskite absorbers – a compound that can be obtained in the laboratory from common materials, such as those used in conventional car batteries, eliminating the need for rare-earth metals in the production of usable hydrogen fuel.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, October 7, 3:23 AM

This development  could be a game changer when it comes to alternate energy. The Michael Gratzel Laboratory at EPFL has produced hydrogen from sunlight and water.  By connecting a pair of solar cells made from a common material known as perovskite and low-cost electrodes, scientists "have obtained a 12.3% conversion from solar energy to hydrogen...a record using earth-abundant materials as opposed to rare metals."  The day is coming when common metals, such as those used  in automobile batteries, will be joined with solar panels to produce the most abundant fuel in the universe--hydrogen.  Hydrogen-powered vehicles are in development now by several car manufacturers, including Ford, GM, Nissan, Toyota, Honda, Mercedes, and BMW.  Current hybrid vehicles require expensive Lithium-Ion batteries and exotic metals available in only a few countries.  Once easily produced hydrogen fuel is available, our dependence on unfriendly regimes for key metals will diminish.  Couple that with a reduced demand for foreign oil, this country may adopt a more realistic, objective foreign policy.  Aloha, Russ.

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Metropolis Magazine, March 2014 | Bionic City®

Metropolis Magazine, March 2014 | Bionic City® | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
How biomimetics could be the key to our urban future (RT @BionicCity: How Do We Make Our #Cities More Resilient?
Via LuizQuaglia
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Naomi Klein: the hypocrisy behind the big business climate change battle

Naomi Klein: the hypocrisy behind the big business climate change battle | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
“Soon after reporting on the 2010 BP oil spill, Naomi Klein discovered that she was pregnant – and miscarried. Was there a connection? She looks at the 'greenwashing' of big business and its effects”
Via Raphael Souchier
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Raphael Souchier's curator insight, September 14, 3:50 AM

Le drame actuel de l'humanité est qu'elle est prise entre deux logiques irréductibles ...

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Why the story of materials is really the story of civilisation

Why the story of materials is really the story of civilisation | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
Mark Miodownik on his lifelong fascination with the materials that he believes are the hallmark of human culture, from the stone age to the silicon chip
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Spitting fish 'adjust for distance'

Spitting fish 'adjust for distance' | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
Scientists say the jets of water that archer fish use to shoot down prey are precisely tuned, to make maximum impact at just the right distance.
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The "first man-made biological leaf" could enable humans to colonise space

RCA graduate Julian Melchiorri says the synthetic biological leaf he developed, which absorbs water and carbon dioxide to produce oxygen just like a plant, could…

Via Roberto S L Naboni
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Rescooped by Rowan Edwards from Sustainable Technologies
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Harvesting energy from humidity: Free, green energy from leaping water droplets

Harvesting energy from humidity: Free, green energy from leaping water droplets | biomimicry as design strategy | Scoop.it
The study of a super-hydrophobic surface has led to discovery of a method for generating power from condensation. Condensing water droplets literally leap off the surface and produce an electric charge that can be harvested.

Via Digital Sustainability, Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Digital Sustainability's curator insight, July 15, 10:57 AM

It’s time to get rid of that dehumidifier — you are just throwing awayfree energy by sucking all the moisture out of the air, according to some new research published by a team from MIT. Postdoc researchers Nenad Miljkovic and engineering professor Evelyn Wang figured out last year that water droplets jumping off a hydrophobic surface could gain an electric charge, but now they’re worked out how to capture that energy, essentially pulling power out of thin air.

The team happened upon this mechanism quite by accident. The goal when the leaping water was discovered was to design a more efficient heat transfer material for power plants. That’s not nearly as sexy as conjuring power from humidity, but Miljkovic and Wang noticed something odd when working with a super-hydrophobic surface (pictured above). The condensing water droplets sometimes spontaneously jumped away from the hydrophobic surface, which was the goal as it cools much more efficiently. They didn’t expect the water droplets to produce an electric charge in the process, and that may have significant ramifications.

It’s the natural tendency of water to flow away from a hydrophobic surface, but in turning the leaping water into a viable method of power generation, the researchers had to give it somewhere to go. To encourage the water droplets to take a leap, a hydrophilic surface was placed just above the hydrophobic one. So the water really wants to make the trip from hydrophobic to hydrophilic, and it brings a few electrons along for the ride. The charge difference between the two plates can then be used to provide power.