biomimicry
416 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by David Fox from Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

Stanford's Flying Fish Glider Bests Ordinary Jumping Robots

Stanford's Flying Fish Glider Bests Ordinary Jumping Robots | biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Researchers at Stanford University have developed a small aircraft that resembles a flying fish which can jump and glide over a greater distance than an equivalent jumping robot. Using a carbon fiber spring to take off, the jumpglider has a pivoting wing that stays out of the way during ascent, but which locks into place to glide farther on the way down."


Via Miguel Prazeres
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Fox from Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

Aviation Industry Dons 'Shark Skins' to Save Fuel

Aviation Industry Dons 'Shark Skins' to Save Fuel | biomimicry | Scoop.it

In its never-ending quest to develop more aerodynamic, more fuel-efficient aircraft, the aviation industry believes the ocean's oldest predator, the shark, could hold the key to cutting energy consumption.


Via Miguel Prazeres
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Fox from biomimicry as design strategy
Scoop.it!

How Biomimicry is Inspiring Human Innovation

How Biomimicry is Inspiring Human Innovation | biomimicry | Scoop.it
Creative minds are increasingly turning to nature—banyan tree leaves, butterfly wings, a bird's beak— for fresh design solutions...

Via Rowan Edwards
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Fox from Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

AeroVironment's Mola Robot Flies Underwater on Solar Power

AeroVironment's Mola Robot Flies Underwater on Solar Power | biomimicry | Scoop.it

A mola, or ocean sunfish, is a very big, very flat, and (in this reporter's opinion) rather silly looking tropical bony fish. Aerovioronment has used the sunfish as an inspiration for one of their latest proof of concept robots: Mola, an oceangoing robot that's powered by the sun.


Via Miguel Prazeres
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Fox
Scoop.it!

Microstructures of Plants May Lead to New Bio-Inspired Materials ...

MIT researchers believe engineers may be able design new bio-inspired materials by compiling and analyzing data on the microstructures of a number of different plants. From an engineer's perspective, plants such as palm ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Fox
Scoop.it!

DARPA Funds a Robot that Moves Like a Worm, But Why? - CleanTechnica

DARPA Funds a Robot that Moves Like a Worm, But Why? - CleanTechnica | biomimicry | Scoop.it
DARPA Funds a Robot that Moves Like a Worm, But Why?CleanTechnicaMIT Invents Biomimicry Robot Worm DARPA, the U.S. Defense Advanced Projects Research Agency, is the financial force behind a new biomimicry robotics project from MIT.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Fox from Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

Robot Swarms Aim to Bring Buildings to Life

Robot Swarms Aim to Bring Buildings to Life | biomimicry | Scoop.it

 It doesn’t take much to be considered smart if you’re a building. Add some lights that turn themselves off when nobody is around or install an “intelligent” air conditioning system to regulate the ambient temperature and you’re well on your way. But compared to the living buildings proposed by Akira Mita, today’s smart buildings are the architectural equivalent of single-celled organisms.


Via Miguel Prazeres
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Fox from Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

Cicada Wing Surface Biomimicry Could Lead to Anti-bacterial Surfaces

Cicada Wing Surface Biomimicry Could Lead to Anti-bacterial Surfaces | biomimicry | Scoop.it

"An international research group of researchers Australia's Swinburne University of Technology and Spain’s Universitat Rovira i Virgili investigated cicada insect and came up with a discovery that may lead to a surface able to destroy bacteria solely through its physical structure."


Via Miguel Prazeres
more...
Laurence's curator insight, March 12, 2013 8:41 AM

"...Une découverte qui pourrait déboucher sur un revêtement auto-destructeur de bactéries, de part sa seule structure physique ...des tests confirment toutefois que le système de défense sous forme de nanopiliers de la cigale, n'est vraiment efficace que contre les bactéries à membrane suffisamment souple..."

Si ces recherches aboutissent, imaginons les applications : poignées de porte, écrans tactiles, combiné de téléphone, sièges dans les transports publics et, pourquoi pas, emballage alimentaire ...? les bactéries sont partout !

Rescooped by David Fox from Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

How Space Robots Could Heal, Learn Like Living Creatures

How Space Robots Could Heal, Learn Like Living Creatures | biomimicry | Scoop.it

No living creature born on Earth has evolved to live in space. But the next wave of space robots may use "bio-inspired" designs based on specialized jellyfish cells, lemur climbing skills or even the fast-learning brain of a human child. Living organisms still have two huge advantages over even the best space robots — biological creatures can heal themselves and they have nervous systems capable of learning from the surrounding environment. At the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics' Space 2012 Conference & Exposition on Sept. 12, robotics researchers from NASA and the U.S. military talked about their hopes for someday making space robots that mimic those biological abilities through self-repair mechanisms and "brains" based on learning software.


Via Miguel Prazeres
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Fox from Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

Flexible Snake Armor Could Inspire Abrasion-Resistant Materials

Flexible Snake Armor Could Inspire Abrasion-Resistant Materials | biomimicry | Scoop.it
Snakes are highly specialized legless animals, which have evolved around 150 million years ago. Although without extremities their body is exposed to constant friction forces. Snake skin could inspire systems in engineering with minimized abrasion.

Via Miguel Prazeres
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David Fox
Scoop.it!

The Wonderful World of Biomimicry, Wilderness Festival, August 2012 | The Bionic City

The Wonderful World of Biomimicry, Wilderness Festival, August 2012 | The Bionic City | biomimicry | Scoop.it
'Welcome To The Wonderful World of Biomimicry' - a presentation given by Design Scientist and Futurist Melissa Sterry at the Natures tent at the Wilderness Festival, Cornbury Park, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom, August 12th 2012.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Fox from Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

Soft Autonomous Earthworm Robot at MIT

Earthworms creep along the ground by alternately squeezing and stretching muscles along the length of their bodies, inching forward with each wave of contractions. Snails and sea cucumbers also use this mechanism, called peristalsis, to get around, and our own gastrointestinal tracts operate by a similar action, squeezing muscles along the esophagus to push food to the stomach.

Now researchers at MIT, Harvard University and Seoul National University have engineered a soft autonomous robot that moves via peristalsis, crawling across surfaces by contracting segments of its body, much like an earthworm.


Via Miguel Prazeres
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Fox from Biomimicry
Scoop.it!

Spider Hairs Biomimicry for Hydrophobic Surfaces

Spider Hairs Biomimicry for Hydrophobic Surfaces | biomimicry | Scoop.it

Engineering researchers have created what they say is a “nearly perfect hydrophobic interface” by mimicking spiders. By using plastic to reproduce the shape and patterns of the minute hairs that grow on the bodies of spiders, the researchers have created one of the most water-phobic surfaces yet.


Via Miguel Prazeres
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by David Fox from biomimicry as design strategy
Scoop.it!

The Need for a Visual Language of Biomimicry | Eco | Interface

The Need for a Visual Language of Biomimicry | Eco | Interface | biomimicry | Scoop.it
Yet, these languages mentioned above are ways to structure the information for thinking, not necessarily apt communication strategies. A complete language then must also addresses communication, and as Alëna shows in her work, ...

Via Rowan Edwards
more...
No comment yet.