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Biomimetic nano-environments as templates for skin regeneration

Biomimetic nano-environments as templates for skin regeneration | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
Cellular functions within living organisms are extremely complex processes and researchers have been using nanopatterned substrates to control and monitor cellular functions in order to design and fabricate nanoscale biotechnological systems. Especially stem cell research has benefitted from nanopatterned surfaces to maintains stem cells' long-term viability and phenotype during experiments. Nevertheless, despite the intense scientific efforts to achieve precise control of stem cell fates with engineered nanopatterned substrates, reliable and cost effective control of stem cell behavior remains a challenge.
Most of the tissues and organs in the human body, with their distinct three-dimensional structures, require support – scaffold/substrate, template, and artificial extracellular matrix or niche – for their formation from diverse cells.
Researchers have now fabricated biomimetic substrates that are similar to that of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) in the epidermis which assists proliferation, differentiation, and biosynthesis of the keratinocyte (i.e. human outer skin) cells. "
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Inspired by Nature, Researchers Create Tougher Metal Materials

Inspired by Nature, Researchers Create Tougher Metal Materials | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Drawing inspiration from the structure of bones and bamboo, researchers have found that by gradually changing the internal structure of metals they can make stronger, tougher materials that can be customized for a wide variety of applications – from body armor to automobile parts.

 

“If you looked at metal under a microscope you’d see that it is composed of millions of closely-packed grains,” says Yuntian Zhu, a professor of materials science and engineering at NC State and senior author of two papers on the new work. “The size and disposition of those grains affect the metal’s physical characteristics.”

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Nature inspires flying robot design

Nature inspires flying robot design | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
Engineers and biologists are working together to create the next generation of nature-inspired flying robots.
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Biomimicry Breakthrough: Butterfly Wings Could Lead to Better Solar Panels

Biomimicry Breakthrough: Butterfly Wings Could Lead to Better Solar Panels | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
A Butterfly-Powered Future? Biomimicry is the act of applying biological principles to to human designs. Velcro is the most obvious example (see more of them in our Nature-Inspired Innovations slideshow). The latest discovery has to do with butterfly
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Learning from nature: Vascular networks make self-healing possible in composites | PlasticsToday.com

Learning from nature: Vascular networks make self-healing possible in composites | PlasticsToday.com | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
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23 Functions of Feathers | ASU - Ask A Biologist

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Feathers make birds unique as an animal. How they are used by birds can be unique too. If you think to yourself you can probably come up with maybe a half dozen to a dozen ways feathers are used by birds. To be sure you will have missed a few feather functions. Let's go through 23 ways birds can use their feathers.

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Une puce neuromorphique inspirée des insectes !

Une puce neuromorphique inspirée des insectes ! | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Des chercheurs allemands de l’Université libre de Berlin, dirigés par le professeur Michael Schmuker, ont mis au point, en coopération avec l'Université d'Heidelberg, une puce dite "neuromorphique" qui reproduit physiquement un réseau de neurones.

"Nous apportons la preuve de concept qu’une puce neuromorphique peut effectuer le traitement massivement parallèle des données et peut résoudre des problèmes informatiques classiques", précise le professeur Michael Schmuker.

Pour réaliser cette puce baptisée "Spikey", les chercheurs se sont inspirés du fonctionnement du système olfactif des insectes en décomposant le traitement des données en trois étapes. Grâce à cette modélisation, cette puce a pu reconnaître les chiffres manuscrits et distinguer les espèces de plantes en fonction de leurs caractéristiques florales.

"L'informatique neuromorphique représente une rupture majeure car elle apporte des solutions à des problèmes que les ordinateurs conventionnels auraient beaucoup de mal à résoudre", précise Michael Schmuker qui ajoute "Notre travail fournit une preuve de concept qu'il est possible de coupler un réseau de dopage neuronal fonctionnel et un système matériel neuromorphique configurable pour résoudre des problèmes informatiques".

 

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Bioceramic armor - Tough as nails, yet clear enough to read through

Bioceramic armor - Tough as nails, yet clear enough to read through | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

 

The shells of a sea creature, the mollusk Placuna placenta, are not only exceptionally tough, but also clear enough to read through. Now, researchers at MIT have analyzed these shells to determine exactly why they are so resistant to penetration and damage — even though they are 99 percent calcite, a weak, brittle mineral.The shells’ unique properties emerge from a specialized nanostructure that allows optical clarity, as well as efficient energy dissipation and the ability to localize deformation, the researchers found. The results are published this week in the journal Nature Materials ("Pervasive nanoscale deformation twinning as a catalyst for efficient energy dissipation in a bioceramic armour"), in a paper co-authored by MIT graduate student Ling Li and professor Christine Ortiz.



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Scientists Discover the Key to Making Paint That Never Fades

Scientists Discover the Key to Making Paint That Never Fades | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

It seems like scientists are all about immortality these days. It's not just plants and people that are getting the treatment, though. A team of Harvard engineers are developing a way of producing color that could produce paint that never fades, and displays that never go dark.

Believe it or not, the method is based on bird feathers, which last centuries without losing their bright hues. This is because of how their colors are formed. Unlike your t-shirt or a painting on the wall, feathers don't get their color from pigments that absorb certain wavelengths and reflect the rest. "What that means is that the material is absorbing some energy, and that means that over time, the material will fade," says Vinothan N. Manoharan, a researcher at Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Science who's leading the effort.

Bird feathers, by contrast, stay bright because their feathers contain nanostructures that amplify specific wavelengths of light. It's called structural color.

 

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Biomimetics in Shaving | The T³ Oracle

Biomimetics in Shaving | The T³ Oracle | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Based on friction tests of surfaces mimicking the textures evolved on frog, cricket and salamander feet, Technion scientists innovate a way to significantly improve the shaving process.

Technion scientists discovered a way to significantly improve shaving process, following friction tests of surfaces mimicking the textures evolved on frog, cricket and salamander feet.

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New Blood-Resistant Glue Mends Broken Hearts Without Sutures – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science

New Blood-Resistant Glue Mends Broken Hearts Without Sutures – Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Karp has a history of making “bioinspired” adhesives, from sticky tape based on a parasitic worm to medical needles based on a porcupine’s quills. This time, he drew inspiration from several animals that can stick to wet surfaces.  Insects, for example, often secrete viscous, water-repellent substances from their feet, which push water out of any gaps in the underlying surfaces. Meanwhile, the sandcastle worm builds underwater tubes by exuding a glue from its head. This substance is also water-repellent and viscous, and hardens over time into a strong adhesive.

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Gecko-inspired adhesion: Self-cleaning and reliable

Gecko-inspired adhesion: Self-cleaning and reliable | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Nanowerk News) Geckos outclass adhesive tapes in one respect: Even after repeated contact with dirt and dust do their feet perfectly adhere to smooth surfaces. Researchers of the KIT and the Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, have now developed the first adhesive tape that does not only adhere to a surface as reliably as the toes of a gecko, but also possesses similar self-cleaning properties. Using such a tape, food packagings or bandages might be opened and closed several times. The results are published in the Interfacejournal of the British Royal Society

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Electric fish inspire agile robots

Electric fish inspire agile robots | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Electric fish from South America are opening up new ideas in robotics.

Ghost knifefish, as they are known, put a small current through the water to sense their environment, and undulate a long fin to move around.

Scientists at Northwestern University, US, believe both features could be harnessed in a new class of autonomous underwater vehicles.

They are developing robots that will be able to swim around debris in total darkness, such as inside a sunken ship.

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Taking a Pounding: How Woodpeckers Avoid Concussions

Taking a Pounding: How Woodpeckers Avoid Concussions | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

A woodpecker drums 18 to 22 times per second with a deceleration of 1200 G’s. For comparison, that’s more than 12 times the G-force that results in a brain concussion for a human. Four recently added strategies on AskNature describe woodpecker adaptations that collectively protect the brain from injury.

 

Woodpecker adaptations can inspire designs that prevent impact and vibration damage.

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Fireflies Inspire Brighter LEDs | DiscoverMagazine.com

Fireflies Inspire Brighter LEDs | DiscoverMagazine.com | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
By mimicking the design of a firefly's light-emitting organ, researchers built an LED that shines 55 percent brighter.
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Taking inspiration from nature’s brightest colours | University of Cambridge

Taking inspiration from nature’s brightest colours | University of Cambridge | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
Brightly-coloured, iridescent films, made from the same wood pulp that is used to make paper, could potentially substitute traditional toxic pigments in the textile and security industries. The films use the same principle as can be seen in some of the most vivid colours in nature, resulting in colours which do not fade, even after a century. Some of the brightest and most colourful materials in nature – such as peacock feathers, butterfly wings and opals – get their colour not from pigments, but from their internal structure alone.
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Spiders spin possible solution to 'sticky' problems : UA News

Spiders spin possible solution to 'sticky' problems : UA News | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
How to attach tendons to bones and build stronger adhesives? Stick with spider silk, UA researchers say.
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Self-Healing Plastic Works Like Blood Clots To Repair Damage [VIDEO]

Self-Healing Plastic Works Like Blood Clots To Repair Damage [VIDEO] | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

The latest advances in technology often attempt to mimic the functions of organisms. But no example of biomimicry is as intriguing as a new self-healing plastic that works like our own blood cells, patching wounds with liquid that hardens.

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La bouteille qui transforme l'air en eau - Techniques de l'Ingénieur

La bouteille qui transforme l'air en eau - Techniques de l'Ingénieur | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Basée sur la captation de l’eau dans l’air, cette technologie pourrait révolutionner l’accès à l’eau potable.
C’est un petit scarabée vivant dans le désert de Namibie qui est à l’origine du concept de cette bouteille.
Deckard Sorensen a l’idée de s’en inspirer pour fabriquer une bouteille capable de capter l’eau de l’atmosphère et de se remplir toute seule. Il s’associe pour fonder l’entreprise NBD Nano, le nom étant l’acronyme de Namib Beetle Desert, en hommage à l’insecte.

NBD Nano a donc fabriqué un capteur dont la surface alterne les zones hydrophiles et hydrophobes. L’eau est attirée grâce à des nanoparticules de silicium tandis que des polymères constituent les parties hydrophobes. Pour simuler le vent, quoi de mieux qu’un mini-ventilateur ? Celui-ci permet de créer le flux d’air nécessaire pour faire se rencontrer l’eau et la surface.

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Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors

Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

"Imitating nature is not a new idea. When the GE team put Morpho wings under a powerful microscope, they saw a layer of tiny scales just tens of micrometers across. In turn, each of the scales had arrays of ridges a few hundred nanometers wide. This complex structure absorbs and bends light and givesMorfo butterflies their trademark shimmering blue and green coat."


Via Miguel Prazeres
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 6, 2:50 PM

Great ideas are often taken from nature! Check this one out!

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Flexible Armadillo-Inspired Armor Can Take A Hit : DNews

Flexible Armadillo-Inspired Armor Can Take A Hit : DNews | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Canadian mechanical engineers construct flexible, strong armor from glass that mimics protective animal shells.

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Robot Razor Clams Make Better Anchors > ENGINEERING.com

Robot Razor Clams Make Better Anchors > ENGINEERING.com | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

As part of their research the MIT team, led by Dr. Anette Hosoi, began investigating their new anchor by observing how razor clams dig. Peering through a glass box filled with sand and salt water, Hosoi and her team were startled to find that the razor clam’s movements actually alter the physical properties of its surrounding medium in order to dig faster.

In order to burrow, the razor clam slams its flexible foot into the sandy ocean floor. Once anchored, the foot begins to thrash back and forth, pushing itself further into the sandy surface and dragging its shell behind. Once the shell enters the sand it too gets involved in the digging, opening and closing in quick succession, turning waterlogged sand into a much more malleable quicksand solution.

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TED conferences use security technology inspired by butterflies

TED conferences use security technology inspired by butterflies | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

The TED2014 conference kicks off today in Vancouver, marking the 30th anniversary of the event. The theme of this year's conference is "the next chapter," and each attendee will receive a sample of what could be the next chapter in anti-counterfeit technology.

The TED2014 ID badges feature a small iridescent panel with a "30 years TED" logo. The image isn't a hologram, but is created by billions of nano-scale holes. The technology is inspired by the wings of the Morpho butterfly, and this is one of its first major real-world applications. The super-tiny holes reflect and transmit light in a distinctive way, making the logo easy to identify and hard to copy.

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INT- Research - Biomimetic Surfaces for Air Trapping under Water

INT- Research - Biomimetic Surfaces for Air Trapping under Water | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Nanoscientists from Karlsruhe, Bonn, and Rostock have discovered the Salvinia effect. Under water, salvinia, an otherwise unimpressive tropical floating fern, can retain air in its hairs and remain completely dry. The technical potential of this effect is great according to Professor Thomas Schimmel from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). By means of the Salvinia effect, energy consumption of ships in particular may be reduced drastically.

If the floating fern is pressed under water by wind or a duck, it rapidly builds up an envelope of air that enables it to survive. But how does the plant manage to prevent the air from escaping? The leaf does not only have to contain a storage area for the air, it also must prevent air bubbles from leaving the hairs while the fern continues to breathe. Salvinia molesta has the stunning capacity to retain the thin air layer under water for 14 days at least.

Schimmel and his colleagues have now discovered the trick found by nature. While the surface of the individual hairs is water-repellent, their tips are able to retain the water film. If the water detaches from the surface tips of the hairs when a bubble forms, the water film remains adherent to the boundary layer where the air layer ends and the water film starts.

Schimmel's team demonstrated the Salvinia effect at the laboratory. The water-retaining hair tips were simply covered by a water-repellent nanocoating. Suddenly, the plant was no longer able to retain the air. As soon as the artificial surface was covered by adhesive nanodots at the hair tips, the plant regained its capacity to retain an air layer.

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Marine Sponge Forms Glass Filament with Perfect Periodic Arrangement of Nanopores

Marine Sponge Forms Glass Filament with Perfect Periodic Arrangement of Nanopores | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Materials made by man and those made by biological organisms often deal with similar synthesis challenges – occasionally converging on an analogous solution independently. One example is the giant glass rod that is used by the sea sponge M. chuni to anchor itself in marine environments.

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