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Qualcomm Mirasol display for color e-readers inspired by butterflies | RobAid

Qualcomm Mirasol display for color e-readers inspired by butterflies | RobAid | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
Qualcomm MEMS Technologies new Mirasol display is the first full color, video-capable display on a prototype e-reader, built on the concept of the iridescence of butterfly’s wings. The inspiration for Mirasol’s engineering came from nature’s most vividly colored creatures: the cerulean wing of a butterfly, the ruby throat of a hummingbird, and the rainbow flash of a tropical fish. The crystals reflect light at different angles, causing light waves to interfere with one another, which we see as changing or iridescent colors. Scientists call it structural color, as opposed to color by pigmentation. Mirasol technology, formally known as interferometric modulation (IMOD), uses electrically charged, tiny flexible membranes overlaid onto a mirrored surface to mimic the reflective properties of biological crystals. Mirasol displays require virtually no illumination or backlighting, a power sucking requirement of LCD screens, resulting in significant energy savings. Pike Research estimates
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Sea Creatures Inspire Bottle Design

Sea Creatures Inspire Bottle Design | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Nature is full of elegance. Sometimes that elegance, to human eyes, also appears as great beauty. But being beautiful isn’t (except maybe when attracting mates) the purpose of that elegance. Nature is elegant in its designs because that elegance has a function.

Carlos Rego, a designer with Logoplaste Innovation Lab in Portugal, has found functional patterns in nature that have added beauty to his designs for something as utilitarian as a bottle. Those same patterns added strength while decreasing weight — and therefore material — from those bottles. And recently, the organisms that inspired the company’s latest design may also benefit from it. This story is about learning from nature how to minimize materials while still providing needed strength, how to cooperate, and how to design to make products that are not just less harmful to life, but are also restorative
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Butterfly wings biomimicry for dirt free coated surfaces | RobAid

Butterfly wings biomimicry for dirt free coated surfaces | RobAid | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
Aside the technology being used to generate the energy from the sun, the efficiency of solar panels also depends on the cleanliness of the panels. Moisture and dust debris piled up on their surface require time consuming and costly maintenance, however, a group of researchers from the University of Pennsylvania used bio-inspiration to develop a coating material inspired by the reflective and water-resistant properties of butterfly wings.
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Les Biofaçades : Des algues fournissent en énergie nos bâtiments | Inspire Institut, réconcilier développement économique et biosphère.

Les Biofaçades : Des algues fournissent en énergie nos bâtiments | Inspire Institut, réconcilier développement économique et biosphère. | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

L'Agence d’architecture autrichienne Spitterwerk a mis au point ce concept de façade à base d'algues. Ce projet innovant baptisé BIQ a été construit en Allemagne, dans la ville de Hambourg. Le début du chantier remonte à 2011 et l'immeuble a été livré récemment.

Les façades bio-adaptives de ce bâtiment passif sont constituées de micro-algues intégrées dans les parois. Le BIQ permet ainsi à un bâtiment d’accéder à une certaine autonomie énergétique. Comment ? Grâce au recours à l’énergie solaire et à la photosynthèse ainsi qu’au recyclage de l’énergie solaire.

Des volets bio-réactifs constitués de micro-algues habillent l'immeuble. Ce système permet un développement rapide des algues, en leur offrant les conditions favorables à leur survie. Il ne reste plus alors qu'à capter l’énergie thermique qui émane des algues. Cette énergie sert ensuite à l’alimentation en énergie de l'édifice. La présence des algues en façade et sur les volets permet en outre de créer de l’ombre, améliorant le confort intérieur.

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Biomimetic nano-environments as templates for skin regeneration

Biomimetic nano-environments as templates for skin regeneration | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
Cellular functions within living organisms are extremely complex processes and researchers have been using nanopatterned substrates to control and monitor cellular functions in order to design and fabricate nanoscale biotechnological systems. Especially stem cell research has benefitted from nanopatterned surfaces to maintains stem cells' long-term viability and phenotype during experiments. Nevertheless, despite the intense scientific efforts to achieve precise control of stem cell fates with engineered nanopatterned substrates, reliable and cost effective control of stem cell behavior remains a challenge.
Most of the tissues and organs in the human body, with their distinct three-dimensional structures, require support – scaffold/substrate, template, and artificial extracellular matrix or niche – for their formation from diverse cells.
Researchers have now fabricated biomimetic substrates that are similar to that of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) in the epidermis which assists proliferation, differentiation, and biosynthesis of the keratinocyte (i.e. human outer skin) cells. "
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Inspired by Nature, Researchers Create Tougher Metal Materials

Inspired by Nature, Researchers Create Tougher Metal Materials | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Drawing inspiration from the structure of bones and bamboo, researchers have found that by gradually changing the internal structure of metals they can make stronger, tougher materials that can be customized for a wide variety of applications – from body armor to automobile parts.

 

“If you looked at metal under a microscope you’d see that it is composed of millions of closely-packed grains,” says Yuntian Zhu, a professor of materials science and engineering at NC State and senior author of two papers on the new work. “The size and disposition of those grains affect the metal’s physical characteristics.”

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Nature inspires flying robot design

Nature inspires flying robot design | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
Engineers and biologists are working together to create the next generation of nature-inspired flying robots.
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Biomimicry Breakthrough: Butterfly Wings Could Lead to Better Solar Panels

Biomimicry Breakthrough: Butterfly Wings Could Lead to Better Solar Panels | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
A Butterfly-Powered Future? Biomimicry is the act of applying biological principles to to human designs. Velcro is the most obvious example (see more of them in our Nature-Inspired Innovations slideshow). The latest discovery has to do with butterfly
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Learning from nature: Vascular networks make self-healing possible in composites | PlasticsToday.com

Learning from nature: Vascular networks make self-healing possible in composites | PlasticsToday.com | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
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23 Functions of Feathers | ASU - Ask A Biologist

Nathalie Tuel (nattuel)'s insight:

Feathers make birds unique as an animal. How they are used by birds can be unique too. If you think to yourself you can probably come up with maybe a half dozen to a dozen ways feathers are used by birds. To be sure you will have missed a few feather functions. Let's go through 23 ways birds can use their feathers.

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Une puce neuromorphique inspirée des insectes !

Une puce neuromorphique inspirée des insectes ! | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Des chercheurs allemands de l’Université libre de Berlin, dirigés par le professeur Michael Schmuker, ont mis au point, en coopération avec l'Université d'Heidelberg, une puce dite "neuromorphique" qui reproduit physiquement un réseau de neurones.

"Nous apportons la preuve de concept qu’une puce neuromorphique peut effectuer le traitement massivement parallèle des données et peut résoudre des problèmes informatiques classiques", précise le professeur Michael Schmuker.

Pour réaliser cette puce baptisée "Spikey", les chercheurs se sont inspirés du fonctionnement du système olfactif des insectes en décomposant le traitement des données en trois étapes. Grâce à cette modélisation, cette puce a pu reconnaître les chiffres manuscrits et distinguer les espèces de plantes en fonction de leurs caractéristiques florales.

"L'informatique neuromorphique représente une rupture majeure car elle apporte des solutions à des problèmes que les ordinateurs conventionnels auraient beaucoup de mal à résoudre", précise Michael Schmuker qui ajoute "Notre travail fournit une preuve de concept qu'il est possible de coupler un réseau de dopage neuronal fonctionnel et un système matériel neuromorphique configurable pour résoudre des problèmes informatiques".

 

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Bioceramic armor - Tough as nails, yet clear enough to read through

Bioceramic armor - Tough as nails, yet clear enough to read through | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

 

The shells of a sea creature, the mollusk Placuna placenta, are not only exceptionally tough, but also clear enough to read through. Now, researchers at MIT have analyzed these shells to determine exactly why they are so resistant to penetration and damage — even though they are 99 percent calcite, a weak, brittle mineral.The shells’ unique properties emerge from a specialized nanostructure that allows optical clarity, as well as efficient energy dissipation and the ability to localize deformation, the researchers found. The results are published this week in the journal Nature Materials ("Pervasive nanoscale deformation twinning as a catalyst for efficient energy dissipation in a bioceramic armour"), in a paper co-authored by MIT graduate student Ling Li and professor Christine Ortiz.



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Scientists Discover the Key to Making Paint That Never Fades

Scientists Discover the Key to Making Paint That Never Fades | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

It seems like scientists are all about immortality these days. It's not just plants and people that are getting the treatment, though. A team of Harvard engineers are developing a way of producing color that could produce paint that never fades, and displays that never go dark.

Believe it or not, the method is based on bird feathers, which last centuries without losing their bright hues. This is because of how their colors are formed. Unlike your t-shirt or a painting on the wall, feathers don't get their color from pigments that absorb certain wavelengths and reflect the rest. "What that means is that the material is absorbing some energy, and that means that over time, the material will fade," says Vinothan N. Manoharan, a researcher at Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Science who's leading the effort.

Bird feathers, by contrast, stay bright because their feathers contain nanostructures that amplify specific wavelengths of light. It's called structural color.

 

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Healing Plastics And Reconnecting Circuitry. Biomimicry At It's Finest. | Chorus+Echo

Healing Plastics And Reconnecting Circuitry. Biomimicry At It's Finest. | Chorus+Echo | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

A fascinating new programme highlights how new materials are being manufactured that can actually heal themselves. From ByteSizeScience – “Our latest episode explores materials that mimic the human skin’s ability to heal scratches and cuts. For a first-hand look at self-healing plastics, we visited the lab of Nancy Sottos, Ph.D., professor of engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Inspired by human skin, the plastics repair themselves by “bleeding” healing agents when they are cut or scratched. This research offers the promise of cell phones, laptops, cars, and other products with self-repairing, longer-lasting surfaces.”

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Biomimicry of butterfly wings for more powerful solar cells | RobAid

Biomimicry of butterfly wings for more powerful solar cells | RobAid | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
The discovery that butterfly wings have scales that act as tiny solar collectors has led scientists in China and Japan to design a more efficient solar cell that could be used for powering homes, businesses, and other applications in the future. The researchers turned to the microscopic solar scales on butterfly wings in their search for improvements. Using natural butterfly wings as a mold or template, they made copies of the solar collectors and transferred those light-harvesting structures to Grätzel cells.Laboratory tests showed that the butterfly wing solar collector absorbed light more efficiently than conventional dye-sensitized cells. The fabrication process is simpler and faster than other methods, and could be used to manufacture other commercially valuable devices, the researchers say Wings taken from two species of butterfly were used as inspiration for their work, one is Papilio paris Linnaeus (subfamily Papilionidae of the family Nymphalidae), the other is Thaumantis
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Mimosa biomimicry inspires new adaptive structures | RobAid

Mimosa biomimicry inspires new adaptive structures | RobAid | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Researchers at University of Michigan (U-M) and Penn State University are studying how plants like the Mimosa can change shape, and they’re working to replicate the mechanisms with artificial cells. Currently, their artificial cells are palm-size and larger, but they’re trying to minify them by using microstructures and nanofibers to construct them. They’re also exploring how to replicate the mechanisms by which plants heal themselves.

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Biomimicry in aviation

Biomimicry in aviation | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
Nature has much to teach us about efficient use of energy. Take the bar tailed godwit, for example, which manages to fly, during his migration from Alaska to New Zealand, 10,000 km non-stop, in 10 days with a weight of 1kg. Engineers in various industries are turning to nature for inspiration as they try to design products with better performance and lower energy consumption.

In three short examples we show how paying more attention nature can save money in aviation, housing and shipping.

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Taking a Pounding: How Woodpeckers Avoid Concussions

Taking a Pounding: How Woodpeckers Avoid Concussions | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

A woodpecker drums 18 to 22 times per second with a deceleration of 1200 G’s. For comparison, that’s more than 12 times the G-force that results in a brain concussion for a human. Four recently added strategies on AskNature describe woodpecker adaptations that collectively protect the brain from injury.

 

Woodpecker adaptations can inspire designs that prevent impact and vibration damage.

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Fireflies Inspire Brighter LEDs | DiscoverMagazine.com

Fireflies Inspire Brighter LEDs | DiscoverMagazine.com | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
By mimicking the design of a firefly's light-emitting organ, researchers built an LED that shines 55 percent brighter.
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Taking inspiration from nature’s brightest colours | University of Cambridge

Taking inspiration from nature’s brightest colours | University of Cambridge | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
Brightly-coloured, iridescent films, made from the same wood pulp that is used to make paper, could potentially substitute traditional toxic pigments in the textile and security industries. The films use the same principle as can be seen in some of the most vivid colours in nature, resulting in colours which do not fade, even after a century. Some of the brightest and most colourful materials in nature – such as peacock feathers, butterfly wings and opals – get their colour not from pigments, but from their internal structure alone.
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Spiders spin possible solution to 'sticky' problems : UA News

Spiders spin possible solution to 'sticky' problems : UA News | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it
How to attach tendons to bones and build stronger adhesives? Stick with spider silk, UA researchers say.
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Self-Healing Plastic Works Like Blood Clots To Repair Damage [VIDEO]

Self-Healing Plastic Works Like Blood Clots To Repair Damage [VIDEO] | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

The latest advances in technology often attempt to mimic the functions of organisms. But no example of biomimicry is as intriguing as a new self-healing plastic that works like our own blood cells, patching wounds with liquid that hardens.

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La bouteille qui transforme l'air en eau - Techniques de l'Ingénieur

La bouteille qui transforme l'air en eau - Techniques de l'Ingénieur | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Basée sur la captation de l’eau dans l’air, cette technologie pourrait révolutionner l’accès à l’eau potable.
C’est un petit scarabée vivant dans le désert de Namibie qui est à l’origine du concept de cette bouteille.
Deckard Sorensen a l’idée de s’en inspirer pour fabriquer une bouteille capable de capter l’eau de l’atmosphère et de se remplir toute seule. Il s’associe pour fonder l’entreprise NBD Nano, le nom étant l’acronyme de Namib Beetle Desert, en hommage à l’insecte.

NBD Nano a donc fabriqué un capteur dont la surface alterne les zones hydrophiles et hydrophobes. L’eau est attirée grâce à des nanoparticules de silicium tandis que des polymères constituent les parties hydrophobes. Pour simuler le vent, quoi de mieux qu’un mini-ventilateur ? Celui-ci permet de créer le flux d’air nécessaire pour faire se rencontrer l’eau et la surface.

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Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors

Butterfly Wings Inspire Better Sensors | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

"Imitating nature is not a new idea. When the GE team put Morpho wings under a powerful microscope, they saw a layer of tiny scales just tens of micrometers across. In turn, each of the scales had arrays of ridges a few hundred nanometers wide. This complex structure absorbs and bends light and givesMorfo butterflies their trademark shimmering blue and green coat."


Via Miguel Prazeres
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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 6, 2:50 PM

Great ideas are often taken from nature! Check this one out!

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Flexible Armadillo-Inspired Armor Can Take A Hit : DNews

Flexible Armadillo-Inspired Armor Can Take A Hit : DNews | Biomimétisme, Biomimicry, Bioinspired innovation | Scoop.it

Canadian mechanical engineers construct flexible, strong armor from glass that mimics protective animal shells.

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