BioMedical Engineering. The Future of Medicine and Engineering
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BioMedical Engineering. The Future of Medicine and Engineering
The career that closes the gap between medicine and engineering.
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DesigningaCareerinBiomedicalEngineering.

Maahnoor Shah's insight:

This is an informational booklet from the Zhejiang University Department of Biomedical Engineering that tells the reader all about the career of Bioengineering. It informs the reader on all of the aspects of this career, all of the different fields, and what it is that biomedical engineers do. Also, this informs the reader simply how to design a career in biomedical engineering. Biomedical engineers use their skills in biology, medicine, physics, mathematics, engineering science and communication to make the world a better and healthier place. The challenge of biomedical engineers is to combine science, medicine and math to solve biological and medical problems. They work in hospitals, government agencies, industry, etc.  Biomedical engineering differs from other fields of engineering because they must integrate biology and medicine with engineering to solve the problems of living things and organisms, unlike other fields, such electrical or chemical engineering. They are many different areas of biomedical engineering. There is bioinformatics, which uses computing technology to collect and analyze medical and biological data. BioMEMs (microelectromechanical systems) involves mechanics with medicine and biology. One example of BioMEMS work would include the development of micro robots to one day perform surgery in the body. Biomaterials are substances that are engineered for use that must interact with living tissue.  Those are just some to name specifically. Some others are biotechnology, clinical engineering, genomics, imaging, micro and nanotechnology, and the list goes on. I really liked skimming through this booklet because it is extremely informative. It talks about every aspect of this career and leaves the reader very knowledgeable in biomedical engineering. 

 

Zhejiang University. Engineering in Medicine and Biology. N.p.: Zhejiang University, 2003. Http://bme.zju.edu.cn. IEEE, 2003. Web. 31 Mar. 2013.

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Top 10 Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Universities in the U.S.

Top 10 Biomedical Engineering Undergraduate Universities in the U.S. | BioMedical Engineering. The Future of Medicine and Engineering | Scoop.it
People searching for top 10 biomedical engineering undergraduate universities found the following information and resources relevant and helpful.
Maahnoor Shah's insight:

Biomedical Engineering is a vast field, with many different options for careers. Biomedical Engineering is one of the best careers in the country, and it’s the study of engineering, biology and medicine with the intent of improving human health through technological advancement. Of course, you can complete your undergraduate studies for biomedical engineering anywhere, but there is a list of the top US biomedical engineering Undergraduate Universities. First, is the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, GA. One very interesting thing about this school is that undergrads can participate in a 6-month international study option. The next school is John Hopkins University in Baltimore. In 2011, John Hopkins had the US’ best undergraduate program in biomedical engineering and was also ranked the school as being the 13th best overall university in the nation. Some required work for undergraduates, common in most biomedical engineering undergrad programs include physics, calculus, chemistry and algebra. The third best undergraduate university for biomedical engineering is the University of California- San Diego. Its Biomedical Engineering Department was ranked in the top five undergraduate biomedical engineering departments in 2011. The department offers a few different majors, including general bioengineering, biotechnology, bioinformatics, or pre-medical. There are many other good engineering universities in the US, including the Carnegie Mellon University, Columbia University, and Duke University, just to name a few. I really liked this article because it was very informative and let me know where to go and what to do if I wanted to pursue Biomedical Engineering, which I do. It gave a good list and explained why each school was ranked as one of the top biomedical engineering universities. This comes in handy for someone who really does what to pursue this career, like me!

 

"Prerequisites and Requirements for a Biomedical Engineering Major." Education-portal.com. Education Portal, n.d. Web. 31 Mar. 2013.

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Biomedical Engineer Rated As Best Career in 2011 by U.S. News & World Report

Biomedical Engineer Rated As Best Career in 2011 by U.S. News & World Report | BioMedical Engineering. The Future of Medicine and Engineering | Scoop.it
With median annual wages of more than $80,000 & expected biomedical employment growth of whopping 72% in next decade leaves no doubt for U.S. News & World Report to list Biomedical Engineer at No.1 position in 50 Best Careers of 2011.
Maahnoor Shah's insight:

Biomedical Engineer was rated as the best career in 2011. There are so many reasons why this career was voted the best career; they are a number of different factors. What these engineers do, the money they make, their upward mobility, the education, the preparation, the activity level, and the stress level all play different roles in why this is such a good career. First off, the work of Biomedical Engineers benefits all. If this field did not exist, we would not have asthma inhalers, artificial hearts, prosthetic limbs, or MRIs. Biomedical Engineers develop equipment and make advances to improve or enable the preservation of vitality. The field of Biomedical Engineering is so broad, with so many different areas to focus in. This is also why this is the occupation with the highest expected job growth over the next few years and employment is expected to grow 72% adding nearly 12,000 jobs. Next, Biomedical Engineers are some of the highest paid professionals, the median annual wage being around $80,000. The lowest paid and highest paid engineers wages range from $50,000 to more than $123,000. Also, it is easy to advance and move up in the field of biomedical engineering. This occupation is also not just a standard desk job, and the stress level for biomedical engineers is about average. Finally, it is easy to prepare to become a biomed engineer. Some have undergraduate degrees in mechanical or electronic engineering, and some have graduate degrees for research and development work. To me, becoming a biomedical engineering is attractive and very appealing. The works of these engineers make a difference in the medical world each day, and help improve the quality of life for many. I think this article gives a really good overall look at this field and all the pros and cons from a biomedical engineer himself. 

 

Aurora, Rohan. "Biomedical Engineer Rated As Best Career in 2011 by U.S. News & World Report." Biomedical Engineer Rated As Best Career in 2011 by U.S. News & World Report. The Rohan Aurora, n.d. Web. 31 Mar. 2013.

 

 

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Cyborg bugs and glow-in-the-dark cats: How we're engineering animals

Cyborg bugs and glow-in-the-dark cats: How we're engineering animals | BioMedical Engineering. The Future of Medicine and Engineering | Scoop.it
Author Emily Anthes talks with CNN about the ways biotech scientists are re-engineering animals.
Maahnoor Shah's insight:

In today’s day and age, technology and science have given us advances that one could have ever imagined 10 years ago. Today, Biotechnology has led us to developments such as cyborg insects and fish engineering to glow under UV light, something “you’d see in a movie about the future.”  These are just highlights of some of the developments of the future. Today, scientists are reshaping many livings things, the start of a lot of controversy. One specific example is how a dolphin, Winter, lost her tail and not much after was fitted with a prosthetic one. This process amazed many but is just one thing available with today’s technology. Also, there are options of cloning when someone loses a beloved companion and removing allergens in cats with genetic engineering. One amazing example of genetic engineering is the GloFish, a zebrafish that was genetically engineered to contain a specific protein gene that allows it to be fluorescent. All of these raise many ethical questions. Many people ask if it is fair or just moral. I personally think that genetic engineering is sometimes unfair and wrong, like when engineering mice and rats to have certain diseases, even though it does furthur research. Though it can be used for further advances in this field, I do not think it is completely correct.

 

Hare, Breeanna. "Cyborg Bugs and Glow-in-the-dark Cats: How We're Engineering Animals." CNN. Cable News Network, 29 Mar. 2013. Web. 30 Mar. 2013.

 

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HowStuffWorks "The History of Prosthetic Limbs"

HowStuffWorks "The History of Prosthetic Limbs" | BioMedical Engineering. The Future of Medicine and Engineering | Scoop.it
Prosthetic limbs are incredibly valuable to amputees. Find out how prosthetic limbs restore some of the capabilities lost with the amputated limb.
Maahnoor Shah's insight:

For a long time, prosthetic limbs have been improving the quality of life for people who either lost limbs or were born without limbs. Some of the earliest accounts of prosthetic limbs date back to the Greek and Roman times. One prosthetic toe dates back to between 950 and 710 BC.  This wood and leather was found in the remains of a 3,000-year-old mummy.  Over the years, prosthetic limbs have changed much over the years. In early times, these limbs were constructed of basic things, like wood and metal, and attached to the body with leather. The Dark Ages was a time where prosthetic limbs were used a lot. Knights relied on iron limbs for success and ultimately to hide the lost limb.  Interestingly enough, pirates relied on peg legs and metal hands, something much glamourized in Hollywood.  A French military doctor, Ambroise Paré, was very famous for his work with prosthetics and amputation in the 16th Century.  One major advance was the birth of anesthesia in the 1840s. With this advancement, doctors could perform longer surgeries, which set the patient up for better prosthetic limb use and experience. Today, a huge advancement and major difference is the evolution of the materials used, going from wood and metal, to advanced plastics and carbon-fiber composites. These help the limbs be lighter, stronger and more realistic. Today, limbs are easier to use and more controlled.I personally think prosthetic limbs are wonderful. They give people who have lost limbs new opportunities and chances, which is such an amazing advancement. I thought it was really interest to learn about their history and the fact that they date back to Greek and Roman times. 

 

Clements, Isaac P. "How Prosthetic Limbs Work." HowStuffWorks. HowStuffWorks,Inc, 25 June 2008. Web. 30 Mar. 2013.

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Duke Biomedical Engineer Kam Leong Elected to National Academy of Engineering | Duke Pratt School of Engineering

Duke Biomedical Engineer Kam Leong Elected to National Academy of Engineering | Duke Pratt School of Engineering | BioMedical Engineering. The Future of Medicine and Engineering | Scoop.it
Maahnoor Shah's insight:

Kam Leong, the professor of biomedical engineering at Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering, recently was elected to the National Academy of Engineering, or NAE, one of the highest honors for engineers. Leong has been a professor for almost 30 years. First, he served on the faculty at John Hopkins University from 1986 to 2006, and then he transferred to Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering. Mr. Leong is credited with a multitude of amazing ground-breaking achievements. One colleague of his said, “It would be difficult to overstate the significance of Dr. Leong’s contributions in his field.” A major achievement of Mr. Leong was his contributions to engineered drug-delivery and mediated gene delivery. He was a crucial member of the team that developed the brain cancer treatment Gliadel, a therapy that releases the drug carmustine directly into a tumor site after surgical removal. He developed a “self-vaccine” that can treat patients with fragments made from their own cancer, which has been used in Japan and has treated more that 300 Japanese gliblastoma sufferers since 2007. The purpose of this article was to inform the audience of Kam Leong’s achievements and exactly why he was elected in the NAE. I would have liked to see more information on the NAE itself, but this article was very informative and it was amazing to learn about what this one man did.

 

 

"Duke Biomedical Engineer Kam Leong Elected to National Academy of Engineering."Duke Engineering. Duke Pratt School of Engineering, 7 Feb. 2013. Web. 31 Mar. 2013.

 

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Ryerson Biomedical Engineering Students Invent Brain-Controlled Prosthetic Arm | STUDY Magazine

Ryerson Biomedical Engineering Students Invent Brain-Controlled Prosthetic Arm | STUDY Magazine | BioMedical Engineering. The Future of Medicine and Engineering | Scoop.it
Amputees can now gain more freedom, for less money thanks to two Ryerson University undergrads.
Maahnoor Shah's insight:

Two amazing biomedical engineering students at Ryerson University, Michal Prywata and Thiago Caires, created a ground-breaking device, an AMO arm. This prosthetic arm is controlled by human brain signals, something never done before in medical prosthetics. The Artificial Muscle-Operated Arm is the closest thing a patient can have to a natural limb and it takes about 10 minutes to pick up the technology. This arm gives them much more freedom and more movement compared to traditional prosthetic arms. This arm allows amputees to avoid surgeries and saves them a lot of money. This brain-controlled arm is self-explanatory; it is controlled by the users’ brain signals. These signals manipulate different pneumatic pumps and valves to create artificial muscle movement. This is an amazing improvement from the traditional prosthetic arm that offers limited movement, with mostly mechanical components. Though the field of biomedical engineering is constantly advancing and improving, there are many things that are not quite perfect yet, such as independent finger movement. Since this action requires many more sensors, it is extremely difficult to for example, grip things. I have always been fascinated with biomedical engineering and prosthetics. These two remarkable undergrads, only in the early stages of there career, one in his second year at Ryerson and the other in his third, already have their own company, Bionik Laboratories Inc, in the making. That to me is extremely inspiring and encouraging.

 

Leclaire, Ryan. "Ryerson Biomedical Engineering Students Invent Brain-Controlled Prosthetic Arm." STUDY Magazine RSS. Study Magazine, 1 Apr. 2011. Web. 30 Mar. 2013.

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