Biology of plant
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Rescooped by XIUMIN FU from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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The 21st century is not very conducive to the development of plant scientists...

The 21st century is not very conducive to the development of plant scientists... | Biology of plant | Scoop.it

Many of the great plant scientists of the 20th century grew up on farms or in environments surrounded by plants.

Where are the great 21st century plant scientists growing up?

 


Via Mary Williams
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Rescooped by XIUMIN FU from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Science: KNOX2 genes and the switch from gametophyte to sporophyte

Science: KNOX2 genes and the switch from gametophyte to sporophyte | Biology of plant | Scoop.it

Via Mary Williams
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Mary Williams's curator insight, March 1, 2013 3:29 AM

Nice paper and summary about the genetic control of the switch between the gametophyte (n) and sporophyte (2n) generations, concluding that "KNOX2 genes evolved to maintain diploid differentiation by suppression of the gametophytic development program."

Andres Zurita's comment, March 1, 2013 8:21 AM
Unfortunately it's a paywall pdf...
Jennifer Mach's comment, March 1, 2013 8:48 AM
Love the Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde analogy-- which one is the gametophyte and which the sporophyte, I wonder!
Rescooped by XIUMIN FU from Plant Biology Teaching Resources (Higher Education)
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Phytopathogen type III effectors as probes of biological systems - Microbial Biotechnology

Phytopathogen type III effectors as probes of biological systems - Microbial Biotechnology | Biology of plant | Scoop.it

Amy Huei-Yi Lee; Maggie A. Middleton; David S. Guttman; Darrell Desveaux

 

Summary:

Bacterial phytopathogens utilize a myriad of virulence factors to modulate their plant hosts in order to promote successful pathogenesis. One potent virulence strategy is to inject these virulence proteins into plant cells via the type III secretion system. Characterizing the host targets and the molecular mechanisms of type III secreted proteins, known as effectors, has illuminated our understanding of eukaryotic cell biology. As a result, these effectors can serve as molecular probes to aid in our understanding of plant cellular processes, such as immune signalling, vesicle trafficking, cytoskeleton stability and transcriptional regulation. Furthermore, given that effectors directly and specifically interact with their targets within plant cells, these virulence proteins have enormous biotechnological potential for manipulating eukaryotic systems.


Via Freddy Monteiro, Mary Williams
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Freddy Monteiro's curator insight, February 27, 2013 3:34 AM

For quite some time effector proteins started to be regarded as potential molecular tools to investigate cellular processes. This is an expanding field and I hope effector biology may help on our understanding of plant biology and molecular evolution dynamics.