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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Animal Welfare
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The Rate of Species Decline is 'No Longer Safe' for Humans

The Rate of Species Decline is 'No Longer Safe' for Humans | Biology | Scoop.it
Animal and plant species are declining so quickly that world biodiversity loss is no longer within a “safe limit” and could start to threaten much of the planet’s ability to support humans, according to a major new study. Experts analysed nearly 2.4 million records about more than 39,000 species at 18,600 different places around the world. They discovered that for 58.1 per cent of the world’s land surface the loss of biodiversity was serious enough to call into question its ability to sustain the 5.3 billion people who live there.

Via Khannea Suntzu, Giannis Tompros , The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California, Jeanne Melanson
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Homo Naledi May Be About Two Million Years Old

Homo Naledi May Be About Two Million Years Old | Biology | Scoop.it
A new report revealed that the pre-historic human species Homo naledi may be about two million years old. Paleoanthropologist Francis Thackeray developed a mathematical method to obtain the age of the human species.

Via Ed Rybicki
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Ed Rybicki's curator insight, February 1, 10:45 AM

Francis used to live on the same university residence corridor as me in 1974.  He was serious even then...B-)

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There's A Convincing New Theory That Water Shaped Human Evolution - Business Insider

There's A Convincing New Theory That Water Shaped Human Evolution - Business Insider | Biology | Scoop.it
Business Insider There's A Convincing New Theory That Water Shaped Human Evolution Business Insider According to the standard treatment in evolutionary biology, about 1.8 million years ago man's brain became larger, his gut became smaller and he...
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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Technology Education 101
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The Reasons Why Teachers Need Technology in Their Classrooms

The Reasons Why Teachers Need Technology in Their Classrooms | Biology | Scoop.it

Via Dorothy Black, MsBioTechTeacher
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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Biomimicry
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Self-Healing Plastic Works Like Blood Clots To Repair Damage

Self-Healing Plastic Works Like Blood Clots To Repair Damage | Biology | Scoop.it
There's a new kind of self-healing plastic that works similar to the way blood helps heal wounds in humans, patching holes with coagulating fluids.

Via Miguel Prazeres
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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Biology resources for South African teachers
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▶ Virus Wars

Published on Apr 23, 2014

All cellular life, including you, is in an ancient and unending war with viruses. Watch how viruses attack cells and learn about RNA interference, one of the ways that cells fight back.


Via Andrew van Zyl
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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Biology resources for South African teachers
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▶ Horseshoe Crabs Saved My Life - YouTube

Published on May 19, 2014

Horseshoe crabs aren't really crabs, but they are super old, super cool, and they deserve your respect. Because they may have already saved your life. SciShow explains!


Via Andrew van Zyl
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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Biology resources for South African teachers
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▶ How Evolution works - YouTube

The theory of evolution explains how the enormous variety of life could come into existence. How it is possible for primitive life forms to spawn the millions of different creatures, that exist today. Unfortunately, evolution is often misunderstood, because it's mechanisms seem counter intuitive.

 


Via Andrew van Zyl
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Aspartame Damages The Brain at Any Dose

Aspartame Damages The Brain at Any Dose | Biology | Scoop.it
Did you know that Aspartame has been proven to cause brain damage by leaving traces of Methanol in the blood? It makes you wonder why Aspartame has been approved as “safe” and is found in thousands of food products.
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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Fragments of Science
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Human Genome Shrinks To Only 19,000 genes

Human Genome Shrinks To Only 19,000 genes | Biology | Scoop.it

Genes are the fundamental units of inheritance in living organisms. Together, they hold all the information necessary to reproduce a given organism and to pass on genetic traits to its offspring.

 

Biologists have long debated what constitutes a gene in molecular terms but one useful definition is a region of DNA that carries that code necessary to make a molecular chain called a polypeptide. These chains link together to form proteins and so are the bricks and mortar out of which all organism are constructed.

 

Given this crucial role, it is no surprise that an ongoing goal in biology is to work out the total number of protein-coding genes necessary to construct a given organism. Biologists think the yeast genome contains about 5300 coding genes and a nematode worm genome contains about 20,470.

 


Via Mariaschnee
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Christian Allié's curator insight, January 6, 2014 4:32 AM

"""""""""" Better beeing "Humble" """"""""""""""""

Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Amazing Science
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Brains on Trial: Determine criminal fate based on high-tech images of the brain

Brains on Trial: Determine criminal fate based on high-tech images of the brain | Biology | Scoop.it
What if we could peer into a brain and see guilt or innocence? Brain scanning technology is trying to break its way into the courtroom, but can we—and should we—determine criminal fate based on high-tech images of the brain?

 

Join a distinguished group of neuroscientists and legal experts who will debate how and if neuroscience should inform our laws and how we treat criminals. This World Science Festival program is based on a two-part PBS special, “Brains on Trial with Alan Alda,” which aired on September 11 and 18, 2013, supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, December 30, 2013 10:32 AM

Although this may be possible there is always the chance it could be wrong and then we have Vanilla Sky.

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A Formula for Teaching Controversial Topics

A Formula for Teaching Controversial Topics | Biology | Scoop.it
A teacher has developed a formula to debate topics like gun control with her middle school students.
Samantha Hogan's insight:

Hell yes!  I totally agree! We are not meant to be brainwashers, we need to teach these students critical thinking so they can form an educated opinion of their own!

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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from 21st Century Teaching and Learning Resources
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35 Digital Tools To Create Simple Quizzes And Collect Feedback From Students

35 Digital Tools To Create Simple Quizzes And Collect Feedback From Students | Biology | Scoop.it
35 Digital Tools To Create Simple Quizzes And Collect Feedback From Students

 

If there is one thing teachers lack, it’s time.

 

And while using technology to automate learning has been frowned upon by many, using it to automate time-consuming processes or aggregate data automatically is among the many seamless fits technology can make into any classroom. Which is where the following collections of apps and tools comes in.


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
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Paul Ng's curator insight, December 13, 2013 2:15 AM

The LECTURE IS DEAD.  So many tools exist now for an interactive class that teachers have no excuse... 

Nigel Burling's curator insight, December 15, 2013 12:14 AM

Have used a couple will need to check out the various features.

 

holbel mendez's curator insight, January 17, 2014 11:19 AM

"Very cool tools and websites for creating quizzes and polls!

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Humans are still evolving and we don’t know what will happen next

Humans are still evolving and we don’t know what will happen next | Biology | Scoop.it

Evolutionary biology is not a slow-moving science. Just last month a new species of hominid (Homo naledi) was unveiled at a news conference in South Africa. When did modern humans branch off as an independent species? What have been our most important adaptations? And, most importantly, what is the next evolutionary step for humanity?

We reached out and spoke to five of the foremost experts on human evolution, who shared their expertise and predictions.


Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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Ancient DNA shows earliest European genomes weathered the ice age, and shines new light on Neanderthal interbreeding and a mystery human lineage

Ancient DNA shows earliest European genomes weathered the ice age, and shines new light on Neanderthal interbreeding and a mystery human lineage | Biology | Scoop.it

A genome taken from a 36,000 year old skeleton reveals an early divergence of Eurasians once they had left Africa, and allows scientists to better assess the point at which ‘admixture’ - or interbreeding - between Eurasians and Neanderthals occurred. The latest research also points to a previously unknown population lineage as old as the first population separations since humans dispersed out of Africa.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies, Kim Frye
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on Biomimicry | Interalia Magazine

on Biomimicry | Interalia Magazine | Biology | Scoop.it
Exclusive interview in http://t.co/7LAwQo7ZER with @JanineBenyus - #Biomimicry "the conscious emulation of life’s genius”
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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Biomimicry
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'Chameleon' Crystals Could Camouflage Clothing and Cars

'Chameleon' Crystals Could Camouflage Clothing and Cars | Biology | Scoop.it

"Just as a chameleon can instantly morph its skin color to match its surroundings, a new method of controlling crystals using light and chemistry could make clothing or cars change color on demand. The method involves shining a laser on tiny latex particles to make them assume a 3-D crystalline shape or pattern, such as a letter M. When the laser is switched on or off, the crystals appear or disappear."


Via Miguel Prazeres
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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Biomimicry
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Biomimicry Inspires Squid-like Building - Green Building Elements

Biomimicry Inspires Squid-like Building - Green Building Elements | Biology | Scoop.it
The Biotic-Tech Skyscraper City uses biomimicry and is inspired by squid, using transparency, flexibility, movement and protective pigmentation.

Via Miguel Prazeres
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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Biology resources for South African teachers
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▶ Computers That Think Like Humans - YouTube

Published on May 14, 2014

Wish you were as smart as a computer? Well engineers wish they could build a computer as smart as YOU! Believe it or not, your brain has many advantages over a computer chip, and at a fraction of the wattage. In a world of brain-inspired machine intelligence, computers of the future will no longer require programming -- you'll just need to teach them!


Via Andrew van Zyl
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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from Biology resources for South African teachers
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'Aliens of sea' provide new insight into evolution

'Aliens of sea' provide new insight into evolution | Biology | Scoop.it

 

21 May 2014

Exotic sea creatures called comb jellies may reshape how scientists view early evolution—as their genes suggest nature created more than one way to make a nervous system. These "aliens of the sea" can regrow a very rudimentary brain and have evolved a unique nervous system in a completely different way than the rest of the animal kingdom.

 


Via Andrew van Zyl
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Genes and Addiction

RT @RehabPath: Genes and #Addiction "Susceptibility does not mean inevitability." #AddictionResource http://t.co/TPXj3c4lnB
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New study focuses on human-animal bond - The Prescott Daily Courier - Prescott, Arizona

New study focuses on human-animal bond - The Prescott Daily Courier - Prescott, Arizona | Biology | Scoop.it
News, Information and Real Estate in Yavapai County including Prescott, Prescott Valley, Chino Valley, Dewey-Humboldt, Arizona, AZ (RT @NCStateVetMed: #HumanAnimalBond part of human evolution with evidence dating back 12,000+ years:
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Technology Tools for Reflection - Reflection fo...

Technology Tools for Reflection - Reflection fo... | Biology | Scoop.it
A website to support Reflection in Education K-16 The following technologies can support reflection: web logs (‘blogs’) as reflective journals, wikis as collaborative websites, digital storytelling/podcasting, Twitter and social networks.
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Aussies Are Teaching Sharks to Use Twitter

Aussies Are Teaching Sharks to Use Twitter | Biology | Scoop.it
Scientists in Australia have figured out a new way to prevent shark attacks at local beaches—by signing the sharks up for Twitter.
Samantha Hogan's insight:
Better than the mass culling they were talking about!
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Rescooped by Samantha Hogan from 21st Century Teaching and Learning
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How Will Students Perform? Depends on Teachers’ Expectations

How Will Students Perform? Depends on Teachers’ Expectations | Biology | Scoop.it
How do expectations influence students' achievement? A look into research old and new that shows the role of teachers' expectations influences outcomes.

Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
Samantha Hogan's insight:

This is so true! Our preconceived ideas can have such an impact on the children.  We need to be very careful, that we remain positive and try to be unbiased in the classroom.

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Samantha Hogan's curator insight, December 12, 2013 8:57 PM

This is so true! Our preconceived ideas can have such an impact on the children.  We need to be very careful, that we remain positive and try to be unbiased in the classroom.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:39 PM

This has always been the case, but it particularly pertinent to how studets will use technology as well. This will line up to your expectations - if you expect them to mess around with their iPads - they will. If you expect they will be engaged in learning and model this - they will. 

John Gougoulis's curator insight, December 13, 2013 2:19 AM

It is a truism but teachers behaviours are infuenced by their expectations of students